Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Needs, Values, Truth.David Wiggins - 1987 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 180 (1):106-106.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  • An Idea we Cannot do Without: What difference will it make (eg. to moral, political and environmental philosophy) to recognize and put to use a substantial conception of need?David Wiggins - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 57:25-50.
    1. Conferences on the subject of need are lamentably rare. All the more honour then for this one to the Royal Institute of Philosophy (an organisation long dedicated to saving philosophy’s better self from its worse), to the Philosophy Department at Durham, and to Soran Reader, the organizer and editor.1. Conferences on the subject of need are lamentably rare. All the more honour then for this one to the Royal Institute of Philosophy (an organisation long dedicated to saving philosophy’s better (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Vaulting Intuition: Temkin's Critique of Transitivity.Alex Voorhoeve - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):409-425.
    In 'Rethinking the Good', Larry Temkin makes two core claims. First, the goodness of a distribution is sometimes ‘essentially comparative’ – it sometimes depends on which alternative distribution(s) it is compared to. Second, such cases threaten the transitivity of ‘all things considered better than’. I argue that the goodness of a distribution may indeed depend on what other distributions are feasible. But contrary to Temkin, I also argue that transitivity holds even when the goodness of a distribution depends on the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • How Should We Aggregate Competing Claims.Alex Voorhoeve - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):64-87.
    Many believe that we ought to save a large number from being permanently bedridden rather than save one from death. Many also believe that we ought to save one from death rather than a multitude from a very minor harm, no matter how large this multitude. I argue that a principle I call “Aggregate Relevant Claims” satisfactorily explains these judgments. I offer a rationale for this principle and defend it against objections.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Medical Need: Evaluating a Conceptual Critique of Universal Health Coverage.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):114-137.
    Some argue that the concept of medical need is inadequate to inform the design of a universal health care system—particularly an institutional rather than a residual system. They argue that the concept contradicts the idea of comprehensiveness; leads to unsustainable expenditures; is too indeterminate for policy; and supports only a prioritarian distribution. I argue that ‘comprehensive’ understood as ‘including the full continuum of care’ and ‘medically necessary’ understood as ‘prioritized by medical criteria’ are not contradictory, and that UHC is a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Prioritarianism, Levelling Down and Welfare Diffusion.Ingmar Persson - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (3):307-311.
    I have earlier argued that, like egalitarianism, prioritarianism is exposed to the levelling down objection—which I do not find serious—but also that it faces related, more serious objections that egalitarianism avoids. In this paper I reply to Thomas Porter’s attempt to rebut this argument. I also trace the more serious objections to prioritarianism to the fact that it implies the desirability of welfare diffusion, i.e. that it is better all things considered if a quantity of welfare is distributed over as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Equality and priority.Derek Parfit - 1997 - Ratio 10 (3):202–221.
  • Challenges for Principles of Need in Health Care.Niklas Juth - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (1):73-87.
    What challenges must a principle of need for prioritisations in health care meet in order to be plausible and practically useful? Some progress in answering this question has recently been made by Hope, Østerdal and Hasman. This article continue their work by suggesting that the characteristic feature of principles of needs is that they are sufficientarian, saying that we have a right to a minimally acceptable or good life or health, but nothing more. Accordingly, principles of needs must answer two (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • For the Sake of Justice: Should We Prioritize Rare Diseases?Niklas Juth - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (1):1-20.
    This article is about the justifiability of accepting worse cost effectiveness for orphan drugs, that is, treatments for rare diseases, in a publicly financed health care system. Recently, three arguments have been presented that may be used in favour of exceptionally advantageous economic terms for orphan drugs. These arguments share the common feature of all referring to considerations of justice or fairness: the argument of the irrelevance of group size, the argument from the principle of need, and the argument of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Sufficiency: Restated and defended.Robert Huseby - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (2):178-197.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  • An inquiry into the principles of needs-based allocation of health care.Tony Hope, Lars Peter Østerdal & Andreas Hasman - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (9):470-480.
    The concept of need is often proposed as providing an additional or alternative criterion to cost-effectiveness in making allocation decisions in health care. If it is to be of practical value it must be sufficiently precisely characterized to be useful to decision makers. This will require both an account of how degree of need for an intervention is to be determined and a prioritization rule that clarifies how degree of need and the cost of the intervention interact in determining the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Priority setting in health care: trends and models from Scandinavian experiences. [REVIEW]Bjørn Hofmann - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):349-356.
    The Scandinavian welfare states have public health care systems which have universal coverage and traditionally low influence of private insurance and private provision. Due to raises in costs, elaborate public control of health care, and a significant technological development in health care, priority setting came on the public agenda comparatively early in the Scandinavian countries. The development of health care priority setting has been partly homogeneous and appears to follow certain phases. This can be of broader interest as it may (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Review article: Aggregation and non-utilitarian moral theories.Iwao Hirose - 2007 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):273-284.
  • Aggregation and the Separateness of Persons.Iwao Hirose - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (2):182-205.
    Many critics of utilitarianism claim that we should reject interpersonal aggregation because aggregative principles do not take the separateness of persons seriously. In this article, I will reject this claim. I will first elucidate the theoretical structure of aggregation. I will then consider various interpretations of the notion of the separateness of persons and clarify what exactly those critics are trying to reject by appealing to the notion of the separateness of persons. I will argue that none of these interpretations (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Health care need: Three interpretations.Andreas Hasman, Tony Hope & Lars Peter Osterdal - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):145–156.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • From Needs to Health Care Needs.Erik Gustavsson - 2013 - Health Care Analysis (1):1-14.
    One generally considered plausible way to allocate resources in health care is according to people’s needs. In this paper I focus on a somewhat overlooked issue, that is the conceptual structure of health care needs. It is argued that what conceptual understanding of needs one has is decisive in the assessment of what qualifies as a health care need and what does not. The aim for this paper is a clarification of the concept of health care need with a starting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Health-care needs and shared decision-making in priority-setting.Erik Gustavsson & Lars Sandman - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):13-22.
    In this paper we explore the relation between health-care needs and patients’ desires within shared decision-making in a context of priority setting in health care. We begin by outlining some general characteristics of the concept of health-care need as well as the notions of SDM and desire. Secondly we will discuss how to distinguish between needs and desires for health care. Thirdly we present three cases which all aim to bring out and discuss a number of queries which seem to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Necessity and desire.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1984 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (1):1-13.
  • Equality as a moral ideal.Harry Frankfurt - 1987 - Ethics 98 (1):21-43.
  • On the possibility of nonaggregative priority for the worst off.Marc Fleurbaey, Bertil Tungodden & Peter Vallentyne - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):258-285.
    We shall focus on moral theories that are solely concerned with promoting the benefits (e.g., wellbeing) of individuals and explore the possibility of such theories ascribing some priority to benefits to those who are worse off—without this priority being absolute. Utilitarianism (which evaluates alternatives on the basis of total or average benefits) ascribes no priority to the worse off, and leximin (which evaluates alternatives by giving lexical priority to the worst off, and then the second worst off, and so on) (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Equality, priority, and compassion.Roger Crisp - 2003 - Ethics 113 (4):745-763.
    In recent years there has been a good deal of discussion of equality’s place in the best account of distribution or distributive justice. One central question has been whether egalitarianism should give way to a principle requiring us to give priority to the worse off. In this article, I shall begin by arguing that the grounding of equality is indeed insecure and that the priority principle appears to have certain advantages over egalitarianism. But I shall then claim that the priority (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   170 citations  
  • Why sufficiency is not enough.Paula Casal - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):296-326.
  • Priority or sufficiency …or both?Campbell Brown - 2005 - Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):199-220.
    Prioritarianism is the view that we ought to give priority to benefiting those who are worse off. Sufficientism, on the other hand, is the view that we ought to give priority to benefiting those who are not sufficiently well off. This paper concerns the relative merits of these two views; in particular, it examines an argument advanced by Roger Crisp to the effect that sufficientism is the superior of the two. My aim is to show that Crisp's argument is unsound. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • The doctrine of sufficiency: A defence.Yitzhak Benbaji - 2005 - Utilitas 17 (3):310-332.
    This article proposes an analysis of the doctrine of sufficiency. According to my reading, the doctrine's basic positive claim is ‘prioritarian’: benefiting x is of special moral importance where (and only where) x is badly off. Its negative claim is anti-egalitarian: most comparative facts expressed by statements of the type ‘x is worse off than y’ have no moral significance at all. This contradicts the ‘classical’ priority view according to which, although equality per se does not matter, whenever x is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Sufficiency or priority?Yitzhak Benbaji - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):327–348.
  • Luck egalitarianism and prioritarianism.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):339-349.
    In her recent, provocative essay “What Is the Point of Equality?”, Elizabeth Anderson argues against a common ideal of egalitarian justice that she calls “ luck egalitarianism” and in favor of an approach she calls “democratic equality.”1 According to the luck egalitarian, the aim of justice as equality is to eliminate so far as is possible the impact on people’s lives of bad luck that falls on them through no fault or choice of their own. In the ideal luck egalitarian (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   149 citations  
  • On the Nature of Health an Action-Theoretic Approach.Lennart Nordenfelt - 1987
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   102 citations  
  • Should the numbers count?John Taurek - 1977 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 6 (4):293-316.
  • Moral Aggregation.Iwao Hirose - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    This book elucidates the theoretical structure and scope of interpersonal and intra-personal aggregation--a trade-off between benefits to a group of individuals and losses to another group of individuals--and defends a form of aggregation -- formal aggregation -- that resolves a variety of outstanding problems arising from the conventional understanding of aggregation, including the Number Problem concerning the moral relevance of the number of individuals.
  • Egalitarianism.Iwao Hirose - 2014 - Routledge.
    Some people are worse off than others. Does this fact give rise to moral concern? Egalitarianism claims that it does, for a wide array of reasons. It is one of the most important and hotly debated problems in moral and political philosophy, occupying a central place in the work of John Rawls, Thomas Nagel, G. A. Cohen and Derek Parfit. It also plays an important role in practical contexts such as the allocation of health care resources, the design of education (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • .David Wiggins - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research:442-448.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   199 citations  
  • Egalitarianism.Richard Arneson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Measuring needs for priority setting in healthcare planning and policy.Anders Herlitz & David Horan - 2016 - Social Science and Medicine 157:96-102.
    Much research aimed at developing measures for normative criteria to guide the assessment of healthcare resource allocation decisions has focused on health maximization, equity concerns and more recently approaches based on health capabilities. However, a widely embraced idea is that health resources should be allocated to meet health needs. Little attention has been given to the principle of need which is often mentioned as an alternative independent criteria that could be used to guide healthcare evaluations. This paper develops a model (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Equality as a Moral Ideal.Harry Frankfurt - 1997 - In Louis P. Pojman & Robert Westmoreland (eds.), Equality: Selected Readings. Oup Usa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations