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  1. At the Margins of Moral Personhood.Eva Feder Kittay - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):137-156.
    In this article I examine the proposition that severe cognitive disability is an impediment to moral personhood. Moral personhood, as I understand it here, is articulated in the work of Jeff McMahan as that which confers a special moral status on a person. I rehearse the metaphysical arguments about the nature of personhood that ground McMahan’s claims regarding the moral status of the “congenitally severely mentally retarded”. These claims, I argue, rest on the view that only intrinsic psychological capacities are (...)
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  • Human Rights and the Autonomy of International Law.James Griffin - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press. pp. 339--355.
  • Raz on the Right to Autonomy.Nicole Hassoun - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):96-109.
    : In The Morality of Freedom, Joseph Raz argues against a right to autonomy. This argument helps to distinguish his theory from his competitors'. For, many liberal theories ground such a right. Some even defend entirely autonomy-based accounts of rights. This paper suggests that Raz's argument against a right to autonomy raises an important dilemma for his larger theory. Unless his account of rights is limited in some way, Raz's argument applies against almost all (purported) rights, not just a right (...)
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