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  1. A Cartesian Introduction to Philosophy.Fred Feldman - 1986
     
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  • The Nature of Necessity.Alvin Plantinga - 1974 - Clarendon Press.
    This book, one of the first full-length studies of the modalities to emerge from the debate to which Saul Kripke, David Lewis, Ruth Marcus, and others are contributing, is an exploration and defense of the notion of modality de re, the idea that objects have both essential and accidental properties. Plantinga develops his argument by means of the notion of possible worlds and ranges over such key problems as the nature of essence, transworld identity, negative existential propositions, and the existence (...)
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Peter van Inwagen - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
  • Omnipotence and the Power to Choose: A Reply to Wielenberg.Wes Morriston - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (3):358-367.
  • Omnipotence Again.Erik J. Wielenberg - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (1):26-47.
    One of the cornerstones of western theology is the doctrine of divine omnipotence. God is traditionally conceived of as an omnipotent or all-powerful being. However, satisfactory analyses of omnipotence are notoriously elusive. In this paper, I first consider some simple attempts to analyze omnipotence, showing how each fails. I then consider two more sophisticated accounts of omnipotence. The first of these is presented by Edward Wierenga; the second by Thomas Flint and Alfred Freddoso. I argue that both of these accounts (...)
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  • The Problem of Evil.Peter van Inwagen - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):696-698.
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  • Are We Free to Break the Laws.David K. Lewis - 1981 - In Gary Watson (ed.), Free Will. Oxford University Press.
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Michael Slote - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):327-330.
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  • The Nature of Necessity.Fabrizio Mondadori - 1976 - Journal of Philosophy 73 (12):354-363.
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  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.Gary Rosenkrantz - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):725-728.
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  • Are We Free to Break the Laws?David K. Lewis - 1981 - Theoria 47 (3):113-21.
    I insist that I was able to raise my hand, and I acknowledge that a law would have been broken had I done so, but I deny that I am therefore able to break a law. To uphold my instance of soft determinism, I need not claim any incredible powers. To uphold the compatibilism that I actually believe, I need not claim that such powers are even possible. My incompatibilist opponent is a creature of fiction, but he has his prototypes (...)
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  • Omnipotence.Graham Oppy - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):58–84.
    Recently, many philosophers have supposed that the divine attribute of omnipotence is properly understood as some kind of maximal power. I argue that all of the best known attempts to analyse omnipotence in terms of maximal power are multiply flawed. Moreover, I argue that there are compelling reasons for supposing that, on orthodox theistic conceptions, maximal power is not one of the divine attributes.
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  • The Nature of Necessity.Desmond Paul Henry - 1975 - Philosophical Quarterly 25 (99):178-180.
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  • Abilities.John Maier - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In the accounts we give of one another, claims about our abilities appear to be indispensable. Some abilities are so widespread that many who have them take them for granted, such as the ability to walk, or to write one's name, or to tell a hawk from a handsaw. Others are comparatively rare and notable, such as the ability to hit a Major League fastball, or to compose a symphony, or to tell an elm from a beech. In either case, (...)
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  • Understanding Omnipotence.Kenneth L. Pearce & Alexander R. Pruss - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (3):403-414.
    An omnipotent being would be a being whose power was unlimited. The power of human beings is limited in two distinct ways: we are limited with respect to our freedom of will, and we are limited in our ability to execute what we have willed. These two distinct sources of limitation suggest a simple definition of omnipotence: an omnipotent being is one that has both perfect freedom of will and perfect efficacy of will. In this paper we further explicate this (...)
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  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.Thomas V. Morris - 1993 - Noûs 27 (3):391-395.
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  • Omnipotence.P. T. Geach - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (183):7-20.
    It is fortunate for my purposes that English has the two words ‘almighty’ and ‘omnipotent’, and that apart from any stipulation by me the words have rather different associations and suggestions. ‘Almighty’ is the familiar word that comes in the creeds of the Church; ‘omnipotent’ is at home rather in formal theological discussions and controversies, e.g. about miracles and about the problem of evil. ‘Almighty’ derives by way of Latin ‘omnipotens’ from the Greek word ‘ pantokratōr ’; and both this (...)
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  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.William E. Mann - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):442.
  • An Essay on Free Will.B. J. Garrett - 1984 - Philosophical Quarterly 34 (135):171-172.
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  • Divinity and Maximal Greatness.Daniel Hill - 2004 - Routledge.
    This book examines the divine nature in terms of maximal greatness. It investigates each attribute associated with maximal greatness - omnipotence, omniscience, perfect goodness, eternity, and beauty, arguing that maximal greatness is necessary and sufficient for divinity.
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  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.Edward R. Wierenga - 2019 - Cornell University Press.
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  • The Limits of Maximal Power.Jerome I. Gellman - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 55 (3):329 - 336.
  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.Edward R. WIERENGA - 1989 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    The Nature of God explores a perennial problem in the philosophy of religion.
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  • The Nature of God: An Inquiry Into Divine Attributes.Edward R. WIERENGA - 1989 - Religious Studies 28 (4):575-576.
     
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  • God and Other Minds.Alvin Plantinga - 1967 - Cornell University Press.
  • God and Other Minds.Alvin Plantinga - 1967 - Philosophy 44 (167):71-73.
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  • Logic and Theism: Arguments for and Against Beliefs in God.Jordan Howard Sobel - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a wide-ranging 2004 book about arguments for and against beliefs in God. The arguments for the belief are analysed in the first six chapters and include ontological arguments from Anselm to Gödel, the cosmological arguments of Aquinas and Leibniz, and arguments from evidence for design and miracles. The next two chapters consider arguments against belief. The last chapter examines Pascalian arguments for and against belief in God. There are discussions of Cantorian problems for omniscience, of challenges to divine (...)
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  • Omnipotence Redux.Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz - 1988 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (2):283-301.
  • Omnipotence Defined.Edward Wierenga - 1983 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (3):363-375.
  • Omnipotence.Brian Leftow - 2009 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine that God is omnipotent takes its rise from Scriptural texts which concern two linked topics. One is how much power God has to put behind actions: enough that nothing is too hard, enough to do whatever he pleases. The other is how much God can do: ‘all things’. The link is obvious: we measure strength by what tasks it is adequate to perform, and God is so strong he can do all things. The Christian philosophical theologian who seeks (...)
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  • Omnipotence.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2011 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Omnipotence is the property of being all-powerful; it is one of the traditional divine attributes in Western conceptions of God. This notion of an all-powerful being is often claimed to be incoherent because a being who has the power to do anything would, for instance, have the power to draw a round square. However, it is absurd to suppose that any being, no matter how powerful, could draw a round square. A common response to this objection is to assert that (...)
     
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  • God and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Novel Approach to Knowledge Arguments.Yujin Nagasawa - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    In God and Phenomenal Consciousness, Yujin Nagasawa bridges debates in two distinct areas of philosophy: the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion. First, he introduces some of the most powerful arguments against the existence of God and provides objections to them. He then presents a parallel structure between these arguments and influential arguments offered by Thomas Nagel and Frank Jackson against the physicalist approach to phenomenal consciousness. By appealing to this structure, Nagasawa constructs novel objections to Jackson's and (...)
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  • The Logic of Omnipotence.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (2):262-263.
  • Omnipotence.[author unknown] - forthcoming - Latest Results.
    If asked to define ‘omnipotence,’ the man on the street would probably say that it’s the ability to do anything. That’s about it, he’d think; nothing more needs be said. Philosophers are never so easily satisfied. They take it as matter of professional duty to find serious problems in important concepts, and to suggest that the concept be rejected or that solutions are at hand. This paper falls into the latter camp. Beginning with a relatively simple definition of ‘omnipotence,’ increasingly (...)
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  • Omnipotence: P. T. Geach.P. T. Geach - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (183):7-20.
    It is fortunate for my purposes that English has the two words ‘almighty’ and ‘omnipotent’, and that apart from any stipulation by me the words have rather different associations and suggestions. ‘Almighty’ is the familiar word that comes in the creeds of the Church; ‘omnipotent’ is at home rather in formal theological discussions and controversies, e.g. about miracles and about the problem of evil. ‘Almighty’ derives by way of Latin ‘omnipotens’ from the Greek word ‘ pantokratōr ’; and both this (...)
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  • An essay on free will.Peter van Inwagen & A. Phillips Griffiths - 1985 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 175 (4):557-558.
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  • .R. G. Swinburne - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
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  • God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
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  • Omnipotence and God's Ability to Sin.Nelson Pike - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (3):208 - 216.
  • Omnipotence.Richard Swinburne - 1973 - American Philosophical Quarterly 10 (3):231 - 237.
    CAN A COHERENT ACCOUNT BE PROVIDED OF WHAT IT IS FOR A BEING TO BE OMNIPOTENT, WHICH BRINGS OUT WHAT THEISTS HAVE WANTED TO SAY WHEN THEY CLAIM THAT GOD IS OMNIPOTENT? IT IS ARGUED THAT IT CAN. A BEING S IS SAID TO BE OMNIPOTENT AT A TIME T IF FOR ANY LOGICALLY CONTINGENT STATE OF AFFAIRS X AFTER T, SUCH THAT THE OCCURRENCE OF X AFTER T DOES NOT ENTAIL THAT S DID NOT BRING ABOUT X AT T, (...)
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  • Omnipotence.Joshua Hoffman & Gary Rosenkrantz - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Theism and Modal Collapse.Klaas J. Kraay - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):361.
    God is traditionally taken to be a necessarily existing being who is unsurpassably powerful, knowledgeable, and good. The familiar problem of actual evil claims that the presence of gratuitous suffering in the actual world constitutes evidence against the existence of such a being. In contrast, the problem of possible evil claims that the possibility of bad worlds constitutes evidence against theism. How? It seems plausible to suppose that there are very bad possible worlds. But if God exists in every world, (...)
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  • .Brian Leftow - 2002
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  • Maximal Power.Thomas P. Flint & Alfred J. Freddoso - 1983 - In Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.), The Existence and Nature of God. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 81--114.
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