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  1. Moral Dilemmas: And Other Topics in Moral Philosophy.Philippa Foot - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Moral Dilemmas is the second volume of collected essays by the eminent moral philosopher Philippa Foot, gathering the best of her work from the late 1970s to the 1990s. It fills the gap between her famous 1978 collection Virtues and Vices and her acclaimed monograph Natural Goodness, published in 2001. In this new collection Professor Foot develops further her critique of the dominant ethical theories of the last fifty years, and discusses such topics as the nature of moral judgement, practical (...)
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  • Mortal Questions.Thomas Nagel - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    Death.--The absurd.--Moral luck.--Sexual perversion.--War and massacre.--Ruthlessness in public life.--The policy of preference.--Equality.--The fragmentation of value.--Ethics without biology.--Brain bisection and the unity of consciousness.--What is it like to be a bat?--Panpsychism.--Subjective and objective.
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  • The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.Bonnie Steinbock - 1987 - Ethics 97 (4):878-879.
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  • Axiological Atomism.Graham Oddie - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):313 – 332.
    Value is either additive or else it is subject to organic unity. In general we have organic unity where a complex whole is not simply the sum of its parts. Value exhibits organic unity if the value of a complex, whether a complex state or complex quality, is greater or less than the sum of the values of its components or parts. Whether or not value is additive might be thought to be of purely metaphysical interest, but it is also (...)
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  • Moral Dilemmas.Philippa Foot - 2005 - Mind 114 (454):371-389.
    Moral Dilemmas is the second volume of collected essays by the eminent moral philosopher Philippa Foot, gathering the best of her work from the late 1970s to the 1990s. It fills the gap between her famous 1978 collection Virtues and Vices and her acclaimed monograph Natural Goodness, published in 2001. In this new collection Professor Foot develops further her critique of the dominant ethical theories of the last fifty years, and discusses such topics as the nature of moral judgement, practical (...)
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  • Abortion and Infanticide.Nancy Davis - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (3):436.
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  • Mortal Questions.[author unknown] - 1979 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43 (3):578-578.
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  • Killing, Letting Die, and the Trolley Problem.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1976 - The Monist 59 (2):204-217.
  • Killing and Letting-Die: Bare Differences and Clear Differences.Graham Oddie - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 88 (3):267-287.
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  • The Badness of Killing and Letting Die.E. Carlson - 2001 - Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (4):535-539.
  • Normative Ethics.Shelly Kagan - 1998
     
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  • The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.James Rachels - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
  • Causation by Disconnection.Jonathan Schaffer - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (2):285-300.
    The physical and/or intrinsic connection approach to causation has become prominent in the recent literature, with Salmon, Dowe, Menzies, and Armstrong among its leading proponents. I show that there is a type of causation, causation by disconnection, with no physical or intrinsic connection between cause and effect. Only Hume-style conditions approaches and hybrid conditions-connections approaches appear to be able to handle causation by disconnection. Some Hume-style, extrinsic, absence-relating, necessary and/or sufficient condition component of the causal relation proves to be needed.
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  • Active and Passive Euthanasia.James Rachels - 1975 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  • Critical Notice: Why Killing Is Not Always Worse—and Is Sometimes Better—Than Letting Die.Helga Kuhse - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):371-374.
    The philosophical debate over the moral difference between killing and letting die has obvious relevance for the contemporary public debate over voluntary euthanasia. Winston Nesbitt claims to have shown that killing someone is, other things being equal, always worse than allowing someone to die. But this conclusion is illegitimate. While Nesbitt is correct when he suggests that killing is sometimes worse than letting die, this is not always the case. In this article, I argue that there are occasions when it (...)
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  • The Additive Fallacy.Shelly Kagan - 1988 - Ethics 99 (1):5-31.
  • Killing, Letting Die and the Bare Difference Argument.Royw Perrett - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (2):131–139.
    ABSTRACTI believe that there is no intrinsic moral difference between killing and letting die. That is, there is no difference that depends solely on the distinction between an act and an omission. I also believe that we can reasonably establish this thesis by appeal to the Bare Difference Argument. The form of this argument involves considering two imaginary cases in which there are no morally relevant differences present, save the bare difference that one is a case of killing and one (...)
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  • An Objectivist's Guide to Subjective Value.Graham Oddie & Peter Menzies - 1992 - Ethics 102 (3):512-533.
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  • Abortion and Infanticide.Michael Tooley - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):545-547.
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  • Is Killing No Worse Than Letting Die?Winston Nesbitt - 1995 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):101-106.
    ABSTRACT Those who wish to refute the view that it is worse to kill than to let die sometimes produce examples of cases in which an agent lets someone die but would be generally agreed to be no less reprehensible than if he had killed. It is argued that the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were (...)
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  • Normative Ethics.Shelly Kagan - 2000 - Mind 109 (434):373-377.
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