References in work:

Chien-Hsing Ho (2007). Consciousness and Self-Awareness.

18 found
Order:
Are we missing references?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add references for the above work:

  1. Back to the Theory of Appearing.William P. Alston - 1999 - Philosophical Perspectives 13 (s13):181--203.
  2. Berkeley's Philosophical Writings.George Berkeley - 1965 - New York: Collier Books.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  3. Perspectives on Consciousness.Arindam Chakrabarti - 2003 - New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Conscious Experience.Fred Dretske - 1993 - Mind 102 (406):263-283.
  5. The Structure of Intentionality.John Drummond - 2003 - In Donn Welton (ed.), The New Husserl: A Critical Reader. Indiana University Press.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6. The Logical Basis of Metaphysics.Michael A. E. Dummett - 1991 - Harvard University Press.
    Such a conception, says Dummett, will form "a base camp for an assault on the metaphysical peaks: I have no greater ambition in this book than to set up a base ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   205 citations  
  7. Consciousness Reconsidered.Owen J. Flanagan - 1992 - MIT Press.
  8. Self-Intimation, Memory and Personal Identity.Jonardon Ganeri - 1999 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (5):469-483.
  9.  12
    Dignāga, on Perception.Masaaki Hattori - 1968 - Philosophy East and West 20 (2):195-196.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  10. The Illumination of Consciousness: Approaches to Self-Awareness in the Indian and Western Traditions.Matthew D. MacKenzie - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (1):40-62.
    : Philosophers in the Indian and Western traditions have developed and defended a range of sophisticated accounts of self-awareness. Here, four of these accounts are examined, and the arguments for them are assessed. Theories of self-awareness developed in the two traditions under consideration fall into two broad categories: reflectionist or other-illumination theories and reflexivist or self-illumination theories. Having assessed the main arguments for these theories, it is argued here that while neither reflectionist nor reflexivist theories are adequate as traditionally formulated (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  11. Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge.Bimal Krishna Matilal - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is a defence of a form of realism which stands closest to that upheld by the Nyãya-Vaid'sesika school in classical India. The author presents the Nyãya view and critically examines it against that of its traditional opponent, the Buddhist version of phenomenalism and idealism. His reconstruction of Nyãya arguments meets not only traditional Buddhist objections but also those of modern sense-data representationalists.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   43 citations  
  12.  76
    Reason and Tradition in Indian Thought: An Essay on the Nature of Indian Philosophical Thinking.Jitendranath Mohanty - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Mohanty develops a new interpretation of the nature of Indian philsophical thinking. Using the original Sanskrit sources, he examines the concepts of consciousness and subjectivity, theories of language and logic, and meaning and truth, and explicates the concept of theoretical rationality which underlies the Indian philosophies. Mohanty brings to bear insights from modern western analytical and phenomenological philosophies, not so much for comparative purposes, but rather to interpret Indian thinking and to highlight its distinctive features.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  13. What is It Like to Be a Bat?Thomas Nagel - 1974 - Philosophical Review 83 (October):435-50.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   855 citations  
  14. Phenomenal Consciousness and Self-Awareness: A Phenomenological Critique of Representational Theory.Josef Parnas & Dan Zahavi - 1998 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (5-6):687-705.
    Given the recent interest in the subjective or phenomenal dimension of consciousness it is no wonder that many authors have once more started to speak of the need for pheno- menological considerations. Often however the term ‘phenomenology’ is being used simply as a synonym for ‘folk psychology', and in our article we argue that it would be far more fruitful to turn to the argumentation to be found within the continental tradition inaugurated by Husserl. In order to exemplify this claim, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  15.  63
    Intentionality and Self-Awareness.Roy W. Perrett - 2003 - Ratio 16 (3):222-235.
    In this essay I defend both the individual plausibility and conjoint consistency of two theses. One is the Intentionality Thesis: that all mental states are intentional . The other is the Self-Awareness Thesis: that if a subject is aware of an object, then the subject is also aware of being aware of that object. I begin by arguing for the individual prima facie plausibility of both theses. I then go on to consider a regress argument to the effect that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16. The Concept of Mind.Gilbert Ryle - 1949 - Hutchinson & Co.
    This now-classic work challenges what Ryle calls philosophy's "official theory," the Cartesians "myth" of the separation of mind and matter. Ryle's linguistic analysis remaps the conceptual geography of mind, not so much solving traditional philosophical problems as dissolving them into the mere consequences of misguided language. His plain language and esstentially simple purpose place him in the traditioin of Locke, Berkeley, Mill, and Russell.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1084 citations  
  17.  59
    The Buddhist Theory of Self-Cognition.Zhihua Yao - 2005, 2009 - Routledge.
    This highly original work explores the concept of self-awareness or self-consciousness in Buddhist thought. Its central thesis is that the Buddhist theory of self-cognition originated in a soteriological discussion of omniscience among the Mahasamghikas, and then evolved into a topic of epistemological inquiry among the Yogacarins. To illustrate this central theme, this book explores a large body of primary sources in Chinese, Pali, Sanskrit and Tibetan, most of which are presented to an English readership for the first time. It makes (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  18. Inner Time-Consciousness and Pre-Reflective Self-Awareness.Dan Zahavi - 2003 - In Donn Welton (ed.), The New Husserl: A Critical Reader. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 157-180.
    If one looks at the current discussion of self-awareness there seems to be a general agreement that whatever valuable philosophical contributions Husserl might have made, his account of self-awareness is not among them. This prevalent appraisal is often based on the claim that Husserl was too occupied with the problem of intentionality to ever really pay attention to the issue of self-awareness. Due to his interest in intentionality Husserl took object-consciousness as the paradigm of every kind of awareness and therefore (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations