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  1. A History of Greek Philosophy.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1969 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (3):431-433.
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  • Philosophy, Myth and Plato's Two-Worlds View.Eugenio Benitez - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (2):225-242.
    This paper examines one aspect of the relation between philosophy and myth, namely the function myth has, for some philosophers, in narrowing the distance between appearance and reality. I distinguish this function of myth from other common functions, and also show how the approach to reality through myth differs from a more empirical philosophical approach. I argue that myth plays a fundamental role in Plato's approach to the appearance/reality distinction, and that understanding this is important to the interpretation of Plato's (...)
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  • Permanent Beauty and Becoming Happy in Plato's Symposium.Gabriel Richardson Lear - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press. pp. 96.
    Our first encounter with Socrates in the Symposium is bizarre. Aristodemus, surprised to run into Socrates fully bathed and with his sandals on, asks him where he is going “to have made himself so beautiful (kalos)” (174a4, Rowe trans.). Socrates replies that he is on his way to see the lovely Agathon, and so that “he has beautified himself in these ways in order to go, a beauty to a beauty (kalos para kalon)” (174a7–8). Why does Socrates, who in just (...)
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  • Agathon, Pausanias, and Diotima in Plato's Symposium : Paiderastia and Philosophia.Luc Brisson - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.