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  1. THE* Rules of Stakeholder Satisfaction (* Timeliness, Honesty, Empathy).Kelly C. Strong, Richard C. Ringer & Steven A. Taylor - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):219 - 230.
    The results of an exploratory study examining the role of trust in stakeholder satisfaction are reported. Customers, stockholders, and employees of financial institutions were surveyed to identify management behaviors that lead to stakeholder satisfaction. The factors critical to satisfaction across stakeholder groups are the timeliness of communication, the honesty and completeness of the information and the empathy and equity of treatment by management.
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  • Consistent Questions of Ambiguity in Organizational Crisis Communication: Jack in the Box as a Case Study. [REVIEW]Robert R. Ulmer & Timothy L. Sellnow - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 25 (2):143 - 155.
    The complexity of crisis situations allows for corporate responses to create multiple interpretations for organizational stakeholders concerning crisis evidence, the organization's intentions, and the locus of responsibility. Hence, organizations have the ability to emphasize an interpretation where the organization is viewed most favorably. Using Jack in the Box as a case study, we apply stakeholder theory to ascertain the ethical implications of employing strategic ambiguity in organizational crisis communication. We conclude that the crisis response provided by Jack in the Box's (...)
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  • The Effectiveness of Corporate Communicative Responses to Accusations of Unethical Behavior.Jeffrey L. Bradford & Dennis E. Garrett - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (11):875 - 892.
    When corporations are accused of unethical behaviour by external actors, executives from those organizations are usually compelled to offer communicative responses to defend their corporate image. To demonstrate the effect that corporate executives'' communicative responses have on third parties'' perception of corporate image, we present the Corporate Communicative Response Model in this paper. Of the five potential communicative responses contained in this model (no response, denial, excuse, justification, and concession), results from our empirical test demonstrate that a concession is the (...)
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