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  1. Coexistence of Plants and Coexistence of Farmers: Is an Individual Choice Possible? [REVIEW]Rosa Binimelis - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):437-457.
    The introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in Europe has been characterized by controversy. In 2002, the European Union introduced the concept of “coexistence” as a compromise solution that, through the establishment of science-based technical measures, should allow the market to operate freely while reducing policy conflicts on GMOs. However, the concept remains highly contested and the technical measures difficult to apply. This paper presents qualitative research on the conceptualization and implementation of the coexistence framework in two regions of Spain (...)
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  • The Social Construction of Production Externalities in Contemporary Agriculture: Process Versus Product Standards as the Basis for Defining “Organic”. [REVIEW]B. James Deaton & John P. Hoehn - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):31-38.
    The analysis distinguishes two types of standards for defining organic produce; process standards and product standards. Process standards define organic products by the method and means of production. Product standards define organic by the physical quality of the end product. The National Organic Program (NOP) uses process standards as the basis for defining organic. However, the situation is complicated by agricultural production practices, which sometimes result in the migration of NOP prohibited substances from conventional to organic fields. When this interaction (...)
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  • Forces Impacting the Production of Organic Foods.Karen Klonsky - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):233-243.
    Roughly 20 percent of organic cropland wasdevoted to produce compared to only 3 percent forconventional agriculture in 1995. At the otherextreme, only 6 percent of organic cropland was incorn production while 25 percent of all croplandproduced corn. Only 30 percent of all organicfarmland was in pasture and rangeland compared to 66percent of all farmland. Clearly, these differencesreflect the greater importance of meat and dairyproduction in agriculture overall than in the organicsubsector. In recent years, the organic industry hasgrown not only in (...)
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  • Not in My Body: BGH and the Rise of Organic Milk. E. Dupuis - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):285-295.
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  • Not in My Body: BGH and the Rise of Organic Milk. [REVIEW]E. Melanie DuPuis - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):285-295.
    The advent of rBGH (recombinant bovinegrowth hormone) has spurred the establishment of anorganic milk industry. The food systems/commoditychain analytical framework cannot fully explain therise of this new food. An adequate understanding ofthe consumer's role in the food system/commodity chainrequires more attention to consumption as a form ofpolitics. One way to do this is to look at thepolitics of other new social movements, especiallythose contesting mainstream notions of risk. From thisapproach, organic milk consumption challenges rBGHfrom a ``Not-in-my-Body'' or ``NIMB'' politics of (...)
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