Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Finding Oneself in the Other.G. A. Cohen - unknown
    This is the second of three volumes of posthumously collected writings of G. A. Cohen, who was one of the leading, and most progressive, figures in contemporary political philosophy. This volume brings together some of Cohen's most personal philosophical and nonphilosophical essays, many of them previously unpublished. Rich in first-person narration, insight, and humor, these pieces vividly demonstrate why Thomas Nagel described Cohen as a "wonderful raconteur." The nonphilosophical highlight of the book is Cohen's remarkable account of his first trip (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Allen W. Wood - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):607.
    This book follows hard upon Korsgaard's The Sources of Normativity. Both present the author's influential version of a Kantian theory of normative ethics and metaethics. Whereas The Sources of Normativity was a systematic investigation of "normativity" written as a single unit, the present volume is a collection of previously published papers, some of them already well known and much discussed, dating between 1983 and 1993. By the nature of the case, one might expect less thematic unity in this book than (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   160 citations  
  • Exploitation.Michael Gorr - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):296.
    Despite its title, Alan Wertheimer’s new book is not another tiresome exploration of Marxist economic theories. Indeed, there is virtually no extended discussion of Marxism at all, since Wertheimer believes that what is unique to that perspective is highly problematic, given that when Marxists simply assert that capitalists do exploit wage laborers they are appealing to “the ordinary notion that one party exploits another when it gets unfair and undeserved benefits from its transactions or relationships with others”. His goal is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  • Imprisonment and the Right to Freedom of Movement.Robert C. Hughes - 2018 - In Chris W. Surprenant (ed.), Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Incarceration. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 89-104.
    Government’s use of imprisonment raises distinctive moral issues. Even if government has broad authority to make and to enforce law, government may not be entitled to use imprisonment as a punishment for all the criminal laws it is entitled to make. Indeed, there may be some serious crimes that it is wrong to punish with imprisonment, even if the conditions of imprisonment are humane and even if no adequate alternative punishments are available.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Exploitation.Alan Wertheimer - 1996 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  • Business Ethics: A Kantian Perspective.Norman E. Bowie - 1999 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book provides essential reading for anyone with an academic or professional interest in business ethics today.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   81 citations  
  • Shared Intention.Michael Bratman - 1993 - Ethics 104 (1):97-113.
  • Creating the Kingdom of Ends.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Christine Korsgaard has become one of the leading interpreters of Kant's moral philosophy. She is identified with a small group of philosophers who are intent on producing a version of Kant's moral philosophy that is at once sensitive to its historical roots while revealing its particular relevance to contemporary problems. She rejects the traditional picture of Kant's ethics as a cold vision of the moral life which emphasises duty at the expense of love and value. Rather, Kant's work is seen (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   291 citations  
  • Harm to Self.Joel Feinberg - 1986
  • Global Labor Justice and the Limits of Economic Analysis in Advance.Joshua Preiss - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):55-83.
    ABSTRACT:This article considers the economic case for so-called sweatshop wages and working conditions. My goal is not to defend or reject the economic case for sweatshops. Instead, proceeding from a broadly pluralist understanding of value, I make and defend a number of claims concerning the ethical relevance of economic analysis for values that different agents utilize to evaluate sweatshops. My arguments give special attention to a series of recent articles by Benjamin Powell and Matt Zwolinski, which represent the latest and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The View From Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to view the world in a detached way: We can think about the world in terms that transcend our own experience or interest, and consider the world from a vantage point that is, in Nagel's words, "nowhere in particular". At the same time, each of us is a particular person in a particular place, each with his own "personal" view of the world, a view that we can recognize as just one aspect of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   799 citations  
  • Risky Business: Nuclear Workers, Ethics, and the Market-Efficiency Argument.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):1-23.
    : Workers generally face higher levels of pollution and risk in their workplace than members of the public. Economists justify the double standard (for workplace versus public exposures to various pollutants) on the grounds of the compensating wage differential (CWD). The CWD, or hazard-pay premium, is the increment in wages, all things being equal, that workers in hazardous environments receive, as compared to other workers. Economists defend the CWD by asserting that workers willingly trade safety for extra money. This essay (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Risky Businessnuclear Workers, Ethics, and the Market-Efficiency Argument.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):1-23.
    Workers generally face higher levels of pollution and risk in their workplace than members of the public. Economists justify the double standard on the grounds of the compensating wage differential . The CWD, or hazard-pay premium, is the increment in wages, all things being equal, that workers in hazardous environments receive, as compared to other workers. Economists defend the CWD by asserting that workers willingly trade safety for extra money. This essay examines the theory behind the CWD, presents and evaluates (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is an Agreement an Exchange of Promises?Margaret Gilbert - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (12):627-649.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  • Is an Agreement an Exchange of Promises?Margaret Gilbert - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (12):627-649.
    This paper challenges the common assumption that an agreement is an exchange of promises. Proposing that the performance obligations of some typical agreements are simultaneous, interdependent, and unconditional, it argues that no promise-exchange has this structure of obligations. In addition to offering general considerations in support of this claim, it examines various types of promise-exchange, showing that none satisfy the criteria noted. Two forms of conditional promise are distinguished and both forms are discussed. A positive account of agreements as joint (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Sweatshops and Respect for Persons.Denis G. Arnold & Norman E. Bowie - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (9999):165-188.
    Most shoppers like bargains. Do bargains come at the expense of workers in sweatshops around the world? The authors argue that many large multinational corporations are running the moral equivalents of sweatshops and are not properly respecting the rights of persons. They list a set of minimum standards of safety and decency that they claim all corporations should meet. Finally, they defend their call for improved working conditions by replying to objections that meeting improved conditions will cause greater harm than (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • In Defense of a Social Value Requirement for Clinical Research.David Wendler & Annette Rid - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (2):77-86.
    Many guidelines and commentators endorse the view that clinical research is ethically acceptable only when it has social value, in the sense of collecting data which might be used to improve health. A version of this social value requirement is included in the Declaration of Helsinki and the Nuremberg Code, and is codified in many national research regulations. At the same time, there have been no systematic analyses of why social value is an ethical requirement for clinical research. Recognizing this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Onecofeminist Philosophy.Chris Cuomo - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):1-11.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Defending Double Effect.Ralph Wedgwood - 2011 - Ratio 24 (4):384-401.
    This essay defends a version of the Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE) – the doctrine that there is normally a stronger reason against an act that has a bad state of affairs as one of its intended effects than against an otherwise similar act that has that bad state of affairs as an unintended effect. First, a precise account of this version of the DDE is given. Secondly, some suggestions are made about why we should believe the DDE, and about (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • The Ethical and Economic Case Against Sweatshop Labor: A Critical Assessment. [REVIEW]Benjamin Powell & Matt Zwolinski - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):449-472.
    During the last decade, scholarly criticism of sweatshops has grown increasingly sophisticated. This article reviews the new moral and economic foundations of these criticisms and argues that they are flawed. It seeks to advance the debate over sweatshops by noting the extent to which the case for sweatshops does, and does not, depend on the existence of competitive markets. It attempts to more carefully distinguish between different ways in which various parties might seek to modify sweatshop behavior, and to point (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Kantian Duties to the Self, Explained and Defended.Jens Timmermann - 2006 - Philosophy 81 (3):505-530.
    The present article is an attempt to clarify the Kantian conception of duties to the self and to defend them against common objections. Kant’s thesis that all duty rests on duties to the self is shown to follow from the autonomy of the human will; and the allegation that they are impossible because the agent could always release himself from such a duty turns out to be question-begging. There is no attempt to prove that there are such duties, but they (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The View From Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Behaviorism 15 (1):73-82.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   415 citations  
  • On the Existence of Duties to the Self.Paul Schofield - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (3):505-528.
    Contemporary philosophers generally ignore the topic of duties to the self. I contend that they are mistaken to do so. The question of whether there are such duties, I argue, is of genuine significance when constructing theories of practical reasoning and moral psychology. In this essay, I show that much of the potential importance of duties to the self stems from what has been called the “second-personal” character of moral duties—the fact that the performance of a duty is “owed to” (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Doctrine of Double Effect, Deadly Drugs, and Business Ethics.Lawrence Masek - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):483-495.
    Manuel Velasquez and F. Neil Brady apply the doctrine of double effect to business ethics and conclude that the doctrine allows a pharmaceutical company to sell a drug with potentially fatal side effects only if it also has the good effect of saving lives. This forbidsthe sale of many common products, such as automobiles and alcohol. My account preserves the virtues of the doctrine of double effectwithout making it too restrictive. I apply the doctrine to a pharmaceutical company’s decision to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Virtue and Meaningful Work.Ronald Beadle & Kelvin Knight - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):433-450.
    This paper deploys Alasdair MacIntyre’s Aristotelian virtue ethics, in which meaningfulness is understood to supervene on human functioning, to bring empirical and ethical accounts of meaningful work into dialogue. Whereas empirical accounts have presented the experience of meaningful work either in terms of agents’ orientation to work or as intrinsic to certain types of work, ethical accounts have largely assumed the latter formulation and subjected it to considerations of distributive justice. This paper critiques both the empirical and ethical literatures from (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Understanding the Role of Moral Principles in Business Ethics: A Kantian Perspective.Jeffery Smith & Wim Dubbink - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):205-231.
    Does effective moral judgment in business ethics rely upon the identification of a suitable set of moral principles? We address this question by examining a number of criticisms of the role that principles can play in moral judgment. Critics claim that reliance on principles requires moral agents to abstract themselves from actual circumstances, relationships and personal commitments in answering moral questions. This is said to enforce an artificial uniformity in moral judgment. We challenge these critics by developing an account of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • A Kantian Theory of Meaningful Work.Norman E. Bowie - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1083 - 1092.
    In this article I use Kantian moral philosophy to develop a concept of meaningful work. Specifically, a Kantian would argue that work is meaningful if (1) it is freely entered into, (2) it allows the worker to exercise her autonomy and independence, (3) it enables the worker to develop her rational capacities, (4) it provides a wage sufficient for physical welfare, (5) it supports the moral development of employees and (6) it is not paternalistic. I then provide examples of contemporary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Agreements, Coercion, and Obligation.Margaret Gilbert - 1993 - Ethics 103 (4):679-706.
    Typical agreements can be seen as joint decisions, inherently involving obligations of a distinctive kind. These obligations derive from the joint commitment' that underlies a joint decision. One consequence of this understanding of agreements and their obligations is that coerced agreements are possible and impose obligations. It is not that the parties to an agreement should always conform to it, all things considered. Unless one is released from the agreement, however, one has some reason to conform to it, whatever else (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • Actions, Intentions, and Consequences: The Doctrine of Double Effect.Warren S. Quinn - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):334-351.
    Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0048-3915%28198923%2918%3A4%3C334%3AAIACTD%3E2.0.CO%3B2-P..
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   133 citations  
  • Three Cheers for Double Effect.Dana Kay Nelkin & Samuel C. Rickless - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):125-158.
    The doctrine of double effect, together with other moral principles that appeal to the intentions of moral agents, has come under attack from many directions in recent years, as have a variety of rationales that have been given in favor of it. In this paper, our aim is to develop, defend, and provide a new theoretical rationale for a secular version of the doctrine. Following Quinn (1989), we distinguish between Harmful Direct Agency and Harmful Indirect Agency. We propose the following (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Humanity as an End in Itself.Thomas E. Hill - 1980 - Ethics 91 (1):84 - 99.
  • Murder and Mayhem: Violence and Kantian Casuistry.Barbara Herman - 1989 - The Monist 72 (3):411-431.
    This paper began in the startled realization that little if anything is said in Kant’s ethics about the more violent forms of immoral action. There are discussions of lying, deception, self-neglect, nonbeneficence—but apart from suicide, a great silence about the darker actions. At the least, this should be an occasion for curiosity. Although the degree of concern with acts of violence in contemporary ethics may be in its own way curious, it does not seem unreasonable to expect a moral theory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Inalienability of Autonomy.Arthur Kuflik - 1984 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 13 (4):271-298.
  • Is Payment a Benefit?Alan Wertheimer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (2):105-116.
    What I call ‘the standard view’ claims that IRBs should not regard financial payment as a benefit to subjects for the purpose of risk/benefit assessment. Although the standard view is universally accepted, there is little defense of that view in the canonical documents of research ethics or the scholarly literature. This paper claims that insofar as IRBs should be concerned with the interests and autonomy of research subjects, they should reject the standard view and adopt ‘the incorporation view.’ The incorporation (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Natural Law and Business Ethics.F. Neil Brady - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):83-107.
    We describe the Catholic natural law tradition by examining its origins in the medieval penitentials, the papal decretals, the writings of Thomas Aquinas, and seventeenth century casuistry. Catholic natural law emerges as a flexible ethic that conceives of human nature as rational and as oriented to certain basic goods that ought to be pursued and whose pursuit is made possible by the virtues. We then identify four approaches to natural law that have evolved within the United States during the twentieth (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Imprudence and Immorality: A Kantian Approach to the Ethics of Financial Risk.Tobey K. Scharding - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (2):243-265.
    This paper takes up recent challenges to consequentialist forms of ethically evaluating risks and explores how a non-consequentialist form of deliberation, Kantian ethics, can address questions about risk. I examine two cases concerning ethically- questionable financial risks: investing in abstruse financial instruments and investing while relying on a bailout. After challenging consequentialist evaluations of these cases, I use Kant’s distinction between morals and prudence to evaluate when the investments are immoral and when they are merely imprudent. I argue that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Doctrine of Double Effect: Intention and Permissibility.William J. FitzPatrick - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (3):183-196.
    The Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE) is an influential non-consequentialist principle positing a role for intention in affecting the moral permissibility of some actions. In particular, the DDE focuses on the intend/foresee distinction, the core claim being that it is sometimes permissible to bring about as a foreseen but unintended side-effect of one’s action some harm it would have been impermissible to aim at as a means or as an end, all else being equal. This article explores the meaning and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Social Value Requirement Reconsidered.Alan Wertheimer - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (5):301-308.
    It is widely assumed that it is ethical to conduct research with human subjects only if the research has social value. There are two standard arguments for this view. The allocation argument claims that public funds should not be devoted to research that lacks social value. The exploitation avoidance argument claims that subjects are exploited if research has no social value. The primary purpose of this article is to argue that these arguments do not succeed. The allocation argument has little (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Wrongful Beneficence: Exploitation and Third World Sweatshops.Chris Meyers - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):319–333.
  • Global Labor Justice and the Limits of Economic Analysis.Joshua Preiss - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):55-83.
    This article considers the economic case for so-called sweatshop wages and working conditions. My goal is not to defend or reject the economic case for sweatshops. Instead, proceeding from a broadly pluralist understanding of value, I make and defend a number of claims concerning the ethical relevance of economic analysis for values that different agents utilize to evaluate sweatshops. My arguments give special attention to a series of recent articles by Benjamin Powell and Matt Zwolinski, which represent the latest and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame.Thomas Scanlon - 2008 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    The illusory appeal of double effect -- The significance of intent -- Means and ends -- Blame.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   363 citations  
  • The view from nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 178 (2):221-222.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   266 citations  
  • Harm to Self: The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law.Joel Feinberg - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (1):129-135.
  • Physician‐Assisted Suicide: Two Moral Arguments.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):497-518.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  • What is Wrong with Slavery.R. M. Hare - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (2):103-121.
    This article discusses the definition of slavery as a status in society and a relation to an owner. an imaginary case in which utilitarian arguments could justify slavery. this case, just because it is highly unlikely to occur in the actual world, does not provide an argument against utilitarianism. if it did occur, slavery would be justified in this case, but that is no reason for abandoning our intuitive principle condemning slavery. the adoption of this principle has in the actual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Working Conditions : Safety and Sweatshops.Denis G. Arnold - 2010 - In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Index.T. M. Scanlon - 2008 - In Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. Harvard University Press. pp. 243-247.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   86 citations