Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Intentional Stance.Daniel C. Dennett - 1987 - MIT Press.
    Through the use of such "folk" concepts as belief, desire, intention, and expectation, Daniel Dennett asserts in this first full scale presentation of...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1283 citations  
  • The Theory of Moral Sentiments.Adam Smith - 1759 - Dover Publications.
    The foundation for a system of morals, this 1749 work is a landmark of moral and political thought. Its highly original theories of conscience, moral judgment, and virtue offer a reconstruction of the Enlightenment concept of social science, embracing both political economy and theories of law and government.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   624 citations  
  • The Principles of Psychology.Herbert Spencer - 1855 - Wentworth Press.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps, and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  • Mirrors in the Brain: How Our Minds Share Actions and Emotions.Giacomo Rizzolatti & Corrado Sinigaglia - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    When we witness a great actor, musician, or sportsperson performing, we share something of their experience. Only recently has it become clear just how this sharing of experience is realised within the human brain. 'Mirrors in the brain' provides an accessible overview of mirror neurons, written by the man who first discovered them.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  • Being Moved.Florian Cova & Julien Deonna - 2014 - Philosophical Studies (3):1-20.
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Mindblindness an Essay on Autism and "Theory of Mind".Simon Baron-Cohen - 1995 - MIT Press.
    This text argues that specific neurocognitive mechanisms have evolved that result in "mindreading", an ability to interpret, for the most part unconsciously, non-verbal actions. It suggests that autistic children suffer from "mindblindness" due to selective developmental.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   421 citations  
  • The Evolution of Cooperation.Robert Axelrod - 1984 - Basic Books.
    The 'Evolution of Cooperation' addresses a simple yet age-old question; If living things evolve through competition, how can cooperation ever emerge? Despite the abundant evidence of cooperation all around us, there existed no purely naturalistic answer to this question until 1979, when Robert Axelrod famously ran a computer tournament featuring a standard game-theory exercise called The Prisoner's Dilemma. To everyone's surprise, the program that won the tournament, named Tit for Tat, was not only the simplest but the most "cooperative" entrant. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   857 citations  
  • Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain.Antonio R. Damasio - 1994 - Putnam.
    Linking the process of rational decision making to emotions, an award-winning scientist who has done extensive research with brain-damaged patients notes the dependence of thought processes on feelings and the body's survival-oriented regulators. 50,000 first printing.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1233 citations  
  • Does the Chimpanzee Have a Theory of Mind?David Premack & Guy Woodruff - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):515-526.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   672 citations  
  • The Evolution of Reciprocal Altruism.Robert L. Trivers - 1971 - Quarterly Review of Biology 46 (1):35-57.
    A model is presented to account for the natural selection of what is termed reciprocally altruistic behavior. The model shows how selection can operate -against the cheater (non-reciprocator) in the system. Three instances of altruistic behavior are discussed, the evolution of which the model can explain: (1) behavior involved in cleaning symbioses; (2) warning cries in birds: and (3) human reciprocal altruism. Regarding human reciprocal altruism, it is shown that the details of the psychological system that regulates this altruism can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   594 citations  
  • Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art.Jerrold Levinson (ed.) - 2014 - Palgrave/Macmillan.
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe.Kendall L. Walton - 1996 - Synthese 109 (3):413-434.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   315 citations  
  • The Sudden Devotion Emotion: Kama Muta and the Cultural Practices Whose Function Is to Evoke It.Alan Page Fiske, Beate Seibt & Thomas Schubert - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (1):74-86.
    When communal sharing relationships suddenly intensify, people experience an emotion that English speakers may label, depending on context, “moved,” “touched,” “heart-warming,” “nostalgia,” “patriotism,” or “rapture”. We call the emotion kama muta. Kama muta evokes adaptive motives to devote and commit to the CSRs that are fundamental to social life. It occurs in diverse contexts and appears to be pervasive across cultures and throughout history, while people experience it with reference to its cultural and contextual meanings. Cultures have evolved diverse practices, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Similar Personality Patterns Are Associated with Empathy in Four Different Countries.Martin C. Melchers, Mei Li, Brian W. Haas, Martin Reuter, Lena Bischoff & Christian Montag - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Influence of Trait Empathy on the Emotion Evoked by Sad Music and on the Preference for It.Ai Kawakami & Kenji Katahira - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Being Moved by Unfamiliar Sad Music Is Associated with High Empathy.Tuomas Eerola, Jonna K. Vuoskoski & Hannu Kautiainen - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Music, Neuroscience, and the Psychology of Well-Being: A Précis.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 2:393.
    In Flourish, the positive psychologist Seligman (2011) identifies five commonly recognized factors that are characteristic of human flourishing or well-being: (1) “positive emotion,” (2) “relationships,” (3) “engagement,” (4) “achievement,” and (5) “meaning” (p. 24). Although there is no settled set of necessary and sufficient conditions neatly circumscribing the bounds of human flourishing (Seligman, 2011), we would mostly likely consider a person that possessed high levels of these five factors as paradigmatic or prototypical of human flourishing. Accordingly, if we wanted to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Eliciting Mixed Emotions: A Meta-Analysis Comparing Models, Types, and Measures.Raul Berrios, Peter Totterdell & Stephen Kellett - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Musical Friends and Foes: The Social Cognition of Affiliation and Control in Improvised Interactions.Jean-Julien Aucouturier & Clément Canonne - 2017 - Cognition 161:94-108.
    A recently emerging view in music cognition holds that music is not only social and participatory in its production, but also in its perception, i.e. that music is in fact perceived as the sonic trace of social rela- tions between a group of real or virtual agents. While this view appears compatible with a number of intriguing music cognitive phenomena, such as the links between beat entrainment and prosocial behaviour or between strong musical emotions and empathy, direct evidence is lacking (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Pleasure Evoked by Sad Music Is Mediated by Feelings of Being Moved.Jonna K. Vuoskoski & Tuomas Eerola - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Music, Neuroscience, and the Psychology of Wellbeing: A Précis.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 2 (393):393.
    In Flourish, the positive psychologist Martin Seligman (2011) identifies five commonly recognized factors that are characteristic of human flourishing or wellbeing: (1) “positive emotion,” (2) “relationships,” (3) “engagement,” (4) “achievement,” and (5) “meaning” (p. 24). Although there is no settled set of necessary and sufficient conditions neatly circumscribing the bounds of human flourishing (Seligman, 2011), we would mostly likely consider a person that possessed high levels of these five factors as paradigmatic or prototypical of human flourishing. Accordingly, if we wanted (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Enjoying Negative Emotions in Fictions.John Morreall - 1985 - Philosophy and Literature 9 (1):95-103.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Art and Negative Affect.Aaron Smuts - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):39-55.
    Why do people seemingly want to be scared by movies and feel pity for fictional characters when they avoid situations in real life that arouse these same negative emotions? Although the domain of relevant artworks encompasses far more than just tragedy, the general problem is typically called the paradox of tragedy. The paradox boils down to a simple question: If people avoid pain then why do people want to experience art that is painful? I discuss six popular solutions to the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Enjoying Sad Music: Paradox or Parallel Processes?Emery Schubert - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • The Paradox of Painful Art.Aaron Smuts - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 41 (3):59-77.
    Many of the most popular genres of narrative art are designed to elicit negative emotions: emotions that are experienced as painful or involving some degree of pain, which we generally avoid in our daily lives. Melodramas make us cry. Tragedies bring forth pity and fear. Conspiratorial thrillers arouse feelings of hopelessness and dread, and devotional religious art can make the believer weep in sorrow. Not only do audiences know what these artworks are supposed to do; they seek them out in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Being Moved.Florian Cova & Julien A. Deonna - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (3):447-466.
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • A Simple Solution to the Paradox of Negative Emotion.Rafael De Clercq - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotion in Art. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 111-122.
    This chapter offers a new solution to the paradox of negative emotion in art. Crucial to the defense of this new solution is the normative sense of predicates such as 'is moving', 'is touching', 'is powerful', and 'is gripping'. Roughly, the solution itself is that, in their normative sense, these predicates designate aesthetic properties that we enjoy and value experiencing, even tough, in the cases which generate the paradox, the enjoyment comes at a price.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Pleasure and the Value of Works of Art.Jerrold Levinson - 1992 - British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (4):295-306.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Does the Chimpanzee Have a Theory of Mind?David Premack & G. Woodruff - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):515-629.
    An individual has a theory of mind if he imputes mental states to himself and others. A system of inferences of this kind is properly viewed as a theory because such states are not directly observable, and the system can be used to make predictions about the behavior of others. As to the mental states the chimpanzee may infer, consider those inferred by our own species, for example, purpose or intention, as well as knowledge, belief, thinking, doubt, guessing, pretending, liking, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1035 citations  
  • Pleasure, Displeasure, and Mixed Feelings: Are Semantic Opposites Mutually Exclusive?Ulrich Schimmack - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (1):81-97.
  • L'éducation Sentimentale.Jenefer Robinson - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):212 – 226.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Why Listen to Sad Music If It Makes One Feel Sad?Stephen Davies - 1997 - In Jenefer Robinson (ed.), Music & Meaning. Cornell University Press.
  • Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Rationality and the Human Brain.Antonio R. Damasio - 1994 - New York: Putnam 352.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   387 citations  
  • Fast Thinking.Daniel C. Dennett - 1987 - In The Intentional Stance. MIT Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Evidence for Mixed Feelings of Happiness and Sadness From Brief Moments in Time.Jeff T. Larsen & Jennifer D. Green - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1469-1477.
  • Mixed Affective Responses to Music with Conflicting Cues.Patrick G. Hunter, E. Glenn Schellenberg & Ulrich Schimmack - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (2):327-352.