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Leibniz on Causation – Part 1

Philosophy Compass 10 (6):389-397 (2015)

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  1. Causation and Explanation in Aristotle.Nathanael Stein - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (10):699-707.
    Aristotle thinks that we understand something when we know its causes. According to Aristotle but contrary to most recent approaches, causation and explanation cannot be understood separately. Aristotle complicates matters by claiming that there are four causes, which have come to be known as the formal, material, final, and efficient causes. To understand Aristotelian causation and its relationship to explanation, then, we must come to a precise understanding of the four causes, and how they are supposed to be explanatory. Aristotle’s (...)
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  • On Efficient Causality: Metaphysical Disputations 17, 18, and 19.Robert Pasnau, Francisco Suarez & Alfred J. Freddoso - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):533.
    A quick scan of the leading figures in western philosophy reveals that relatively few have made a name for themselves by defending intuitive, natural, and sensible positions. Aristotle is one, and perhaps Aquinas is another. Francisco Suarez, the sixteenth-century Spanish scholastic, would be a third. His invariable working procedure is to give copious consideration to the various ancient and medieval views, and then to find some sensible compromise position. But today Suarez can hardly claim to have a broad readership. Of (...)
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  • Unpacking the Monad: Leibniz’s Theory of Causality.Marc Bobro & Kenneth Clatterbaugh - 1996 - The Monist 79 (3):408-425.
  • Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 2 Volumes.Jonathan Francis Bennett - 2001 - Oxford University Press (Hardcover).
    In this illuminating, highly engaging book, Jonathan Bennett acquaints us with the ideas of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. For newcomers to the early modern scene, this lucidly written work is an excellent introduction. For those already familiar with the time period, this book offers insight into the great philosophers, treating them as colleagues, antagonists, students, and teachers.
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  • Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist.Adams Robert Merrihew - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Legendary since his own time as a universal genius, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) contributed significantly to almost every branch of learning. One of the creators of modern mathematics, and probably the most sophisticated logician between the Middle Ages and Frege, as well as a pioneer of ecumenical theology, he also wrote extensively on such diverse subjects as history, geology, and physics. But the part of his work that is most studied today is probably his writings in metaphysics, which have been (...)
  • Aristotle’s Teleology.Rich Cameron - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1096-1106.
    Teleology is the study of ends and goals, things whose existence or occurrence is purposive. Aristotle’s views on teleology are of seminal importance, particularly his views regarding biological functions or purposes. This article surveys core examples of Aristotle’s invocations of teleology; explores philosophically puzzling aspects of teleology ; articulates two of Aristotle’s arguments defending commitment to teleology against critics who attempt to explain nature solely through appeal to nonteleological efficient and material causes; and argues that Aristotle was an ontological realist (...)
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  • Monadic Interaction.Stephen Puryear - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):763-796.
    Leibniz has almost universally been represented as denying that created substances, including human minds and the souls of animals, can causally interact either with one another or with bodies. Yet he frequently claims that such substances are capable of interacting in the special sense of what he calls 'ideal' interaction. In order to reconcile these claims with their favored interpretation, proponents of the traditional reading often suppose that ideal action is not in fact a genuine form of causation but instead (...)
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  • The Structure of Leibnizian Simple Substances.John Whipple - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):379-410.
  • Causality and Creation in Leibnitz.Nicholas Jolley - 1998 - The Monist 81 (4):591-611.
    Leibniz is famously committed to the following three metaphysical claims concerning causality.
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  • The Heyday of Teleology and Early Modern Philosophy.Jeffrey K. Mcdonough - 2011 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):179-204.
  • Leibniz's Two Realms Revisited.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2008 - Noûs 42 (4):673-696.
    Leibniz speaks, in a variety of contexts, of there being two realms—a "kingdom of power or efficient causes" and "a kingdom of wisdom or final causes." This essay explores an often overlooked application of Leibniz's famous "two realms doctrine." The first part turns to Leibniz's work in optics for the roots of his view that nature can be seen as being governed by two complete sets of equipotent laws, with one set corresponding to the efficient causal order of the world, (...)
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  • Is There a Pre-Established Harmony of Aggregates in the Leibnizian Dynamics, or Do Non-Substantial Bodies Interact?Gregory Brown - 1992 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (1):53-75.
  • Leibniz on Divine Concurrence.Sukjae Lee - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (2):203-248.
    Leibniz was a divine concurrentist. That is to say, when it came to the question of how God’s causal power relates to the natural causal activity of creatures, Leibniz held that both God and the creature are directly involved in the occurrence of these effects.
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  • Three Types of Spontaneity and Teleology in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):669-698.
    it is one of the central commitments of Leibniz’s mature metaphysics that all substances or monads possess perfect spontaneity, that is, that all states of a given monad originate within it.1 Created monads do not truly interact with each other, for Leibniz. Instead, each one produces all of its states single-handedly, requiring only God’s ordinary concurrence. Several commentators have pointed out that implicit in Leibniz’s view is a distinction between different types of spontaneity: a general type of spontaneity that all (...)
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  • Boyle’s Teleological Mechanism and the Myth of Immanent Teleology.Laurence Carlin - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):54-63.
  • Leibniz on Concurrence and Efficient Causation.Marc E. Bobro - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):317-338.
    Leibniz defends concurrentism, the view that both God and created substances are causally responsible for changes in the states of created substances. Interpretive problems, however, arise in determining just what causal role each plays. Some recent work has been revisionist, greatly downplaying the causal role played by created substances—arguing instead that according to Leibniz only God has productive causal power. Though bearing some causal responsibility for changes in their perceptual states, created substances are not efficient causes of such changes. This (...)
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  • Leibniz: Creation and Conservation and Concurrence.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2007 - The Leibniz Review 17:31-60.
    In this paper I argue that the hoary theological doctrine of divine concurrence poses no deep threat to Leibniz’s views on theodicy and creaturely activity even as those views have been traditionally understood. The first three sections examine respectively Leibniz’s views on creation, conservation and concurrence, with an eye towards showing their sys­tematic compatibility with Leibniz’s theodicy and metaphysics. The fourth section takes up remaining worries arising from the bridging principle that conservation is a continued or continuous creation, and argues (...)
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  • Leibniz: Nature and Freedom.Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The revival of Leibniz studies in the past twenty-five years has cast important new light on both the context and content of Leibniz's philosophical thought. Where earlier English-language scholarship understood Leibniz's philosophy as issuing from his preoccupations with logic and language, recent work has recommended an account on which theological, ethical, and metaphysical themes figure centrally in Leibniz's thought throughout his career. The significance of these themes to the development of Leibniz's philosophy is the subject of increasing attention by philosophers (...)
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  • Leibniz on Divine Concurrence.John Whipple - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (10):865-879.
  • Leibniz on Final Causes.Laurence Carlin - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):217-233.
    : In this paper, I investigate Leibniz's conception of final causation. I focus especially on the role that Leibnizian final causes play in intentional action, and I argue that for Leibniz, final causes are a species of efficient causation. It is the intentional nature of final causation that distinguishes it from mechanical efficient causation. I conclude by highlighting some of the implications of Leibniz's conception of final causation for his views on human freedom, and on the unconscious activity of substances.
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  • Moral Necessity in Leibniz's Account of Human Freedom.R. C. Sleigh Jr - 2009 - In Samuel Newlands & Larry M. Jorgensen (eds.), Metaphysics and the Good: Themes From the Philosophy of Robert Merrihew Adams. Oxford University Press.
  • The Non-Aristotelian Novelty of Leibniz’s Teleology.Laurence Carlin - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:69-90.
    My aim in this paper is to underscore the novelty of Leibniz’s teleology from a historical perspective. I believe this perspective helps deliver a better understanding of the finer details of Leibniz’s employment of final causes. I argue in this paper that Leibniz was taking a stance on three central teleological issues that derive from Aristotle, issues that seem to have occupied nearly every advocate of final causes from Aristotle to Leibniz. I discuss the three Aristotelian issues, and how major (...)
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  • Leibniz's Two Realms.Jonathan Bennett - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. pp. 135--155.
  • Summa Contra Gentiles.Thomas Aquinas - unknown
     
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  • Leibniz: Perception, Apperception, and Thought.R. S. Woolhouse & Robert McRae - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (106):68.
  • Spinoza on Final Causality.John Carriero - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:105-47.
  • Leibniz on the Interaction of Bodies.Richard B. Miller - 1988 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 5 (3):245 - 255.