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  1. Rules Versus Statistics: Insights From a Highly Inflected Language.Jelena Mirković, Mark S. Seidenberg & Marc F. Joanisse - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (4):638-681.
    Inflectional morphology has been taken as a paradigmatic example of rule-governed grammatical knowledge (Pinker, 1999). The plausibility of this claim may be related to the fact that it is mainly based on studies of English, which has a very simple inflectional system. We examined the representation of inflectional morphology in Serbian, which encodes number, gender, and case for nouns. Linguists standardly characterize this system as a complex set of rules, with disagreements about their exact form. We present analyses of a (...)
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  • The Other Side of Cognitive Control: Can a Lack of Cognitive Control Benefit Language and Cognition?Evangelia G. Chrysikou, Jared M. Novick, John C. Trueswell & Sharon L. Thompson-Schill - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):253-256.
    Cognitive control refers to the regulation of mental activity to support flexible cognition across different domains. Cragg and Nation (2010) propose that the development of cognitive control in children parallels the development of language abilities, particularly inner speech. We suggest that children’s late development of cognitive control also mirrors their limited ability to revise misinterpretations of sentence meaning. Moreover, we argue that for certain tasks, a tradeoff between bottom-up (data-driven) and top-down (rule-based) thinking may actually benefit performance in both children (...)
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  • The Role of Multiword Building Blocks in Explaining L1–L2 Differences.Inbal Arnon & Morten H. Christiansen - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):621-636.
    Why are children better language learners than adults despite being worse at a range of other cognitive tasks? Here, we explore the role of multiword sequences in explaining L1–L2 differences in learning. In particular, we propose that children and adults differ in their reliance on such multiword units in learning, and that this difference affects learning strategies and outcomes, and leads to difficulty in learning certain grammatical relations. In the first part, we review recent findings that suggest that MWUs play (...)
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  • Maturational Constraints on Language Learning.Elissa L. Newport - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):11-28.
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  • Learning and Development in Neural Networks: The Importance of Starting Small.Jeffrey L. Elman - 1993 - Cognition 48 (1):71-99.
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  • The Regularity Game: Investigating Linguistic Rule Dynamics in a Population of Interacting Agents.Christine Cuskley, Claudio Castellano, Francesca Colaiori, Vittorio Loreto, Martina Pugliese & Francesca Tria - 2017 - Cognition 159:25-32.
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  • Compression and Communication in the Cultural Evolution of Linguistic Structure.Simon Kirby, Monica Tamariz, Hannah Cornish & Kenny Smith - 2015 - Cognition 141:87-102.
  • Granularity and the Acquisition of Grammatical Gender: How Order-of-Acquisition Affects What Gets Learned.Inbal Arnon & Michael Ramscar - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):292-305.
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  • Language Acquisition in the Absence of Explicit Negative Evidence: How Important is Starting Small?Douglas L. T. Rohde & David C. Plaut - 1999 - Cognition 72 (1):67-109.
  • The Kindergarten-Path Effect: Studying on-Line Sentence Processing in Young Children.John C. Trueswell, Irina Sekerina, Nicole M. Hill & Marian L. Logrip - 1999 - Cognition 73 (2):89-134.
  • Why Are There Different Languages? The Role of Adaptation in Linguistic Diversity.Gary Lupyan & Rick Dale - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (9):649-660.