Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Attending to the Execution of a Complex Sensorimotor Skill: Expertise Differences, Choking, and Slumps.Rob Gray - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 10 (1):42-54.
  • When Does Haste Make Waste? Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff, Skill Level, and the Tools of the Trade.Sian L. Beilock, Bennett I. Bertenthal, Michael Hoerger & Thomas H. Carr - 2008 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 14 (4):340-352.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • When Paying Attention Becomes Counterproductive: Impact of Divided Versus Skill-Focused Attention on Novice and Experienced Performance of Sensorimotor Skills.Sian L. Beilock, Thomas H. Carr, Clare MacMahon & Janet L. Starkes - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 8 (1):6-16.
  • Reasoning the Fast and Frugal Way: Models of Bounded Rationality.Gerd Gigerenzer & Daniel G. Goldstein - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (4):650-669.
    Humans and animals make inferences about the world under limited time and knowledge. In contrast, many models of rational inference treat the mind as a Laplacean Demon, equipped with unlimited time, knowledge, and computational might. Following H. Simon's notion of satisficing, the authors have proposed a family of algorithms based on a simple psychological mechanism: one-reason decision making. These fast and frugal algorithms violate fundamental tenets of classical rationality: They neither look up nor integrate all information. By computer simulation, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   201 citations  
  • On the Fragility of Skilled Performance: What Governs Choking Under Pressure?Sian L. Beilock & Thomas H. Carr - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (4):701.
  • A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks.Clay B. Holroyd, Nick Yeung, Michael G. H. Coles & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (2):163-191.
  • Cognitive Demands of Error Processing Associated with Preparation and Execution of a Motor Skill.Wing Kai Lam, Richard S. W. Masters & Jonathan P. Maxwell - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1058-1061.
    Maxwell et al. [Maxwell, J. P., Masters, R. S. W., Kerr, E., & Weedon, E. . The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049–1068. The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049–1068] suggested that, following unsuccessful movements, the learner forms hypotheses about the probable causes of the error and the required movement adjustments necessary for its elimination. Hypothesis testing is an explicit process that places demands on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue.J. M. Poolton, R. S. W. Masters & J. P. Maxwell - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):456-468.
    Heuristics of evolutionary biology dictate that phylogenetically older processes are inherently more stable and resilient to disruption than younger processes. On the grounds that non-declarative behaviour emerged long before declarative behaviour, Reber argues that implicit learning is supported by neural processes that are evolutionarily older than those supporting explicit learning. Reber suggested that implicit learning thus leads to performance that is more robust than explicit learning. Applying this evolutionary framework to motor performance, we examined whether implicit motor learning, relative to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue.R. S. W. Masters, J. M. Poolton & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.
    Implicit processes almost certainly preceded explicit processes in our evolutionary history, so they are likely to be more resistant to disruption according to the principles of evolutionary biology [Reber, A. S. . The cognitive unconscious: An evolutionary perspective. Consciousness and Cognition, 1, 93–133.]. Previous work . Knowledge, nerves and know-how: The role of explicit versus implicit knowledge in the breakdown of a complex motor skill under pressure. British Journal of Psychology, 83, 343–358.]) has shown that implicitly learned motor skills remain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Benefits of an External Focus of Attention: Common Coding or Conscious Processing?J. M. Poolton, J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & M. Raab - 2006 - Journal of Sports Sciences 24 (1):89-99.
  • The Progression-Regression Hypotheses in Perceptual-Motor Skill Learning.Alfred H. Fuchs - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):177.