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  1. Empathy, Enaction, and Shared Musical Experience.Joel Krueger - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Expression, Arousal and Social Control. Oxford University Press. pp. 177-196.
  • Extended Cognition and the Space of Social Interaction.Joel Krueger - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):643-657.
    The extended mind thesis (EM) asserts that some cognitive processes are (partially) composed of actions consisting of the manipulation and exploitation of environmental structures. Might some processes at the root of social cognition have a similarly extended structure? In this paper, I argue that social cognition is fundamentally an interactive form of space management—the negotiation and management of ‘‘we-space”—and that some of the expressive actions involved in the negotiation and management of we-space (gesture, touch, facial and whole-body expressions) drive basic (...)
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  • Simulation, Projection and Empathy.Dan Zahavi - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):514-522.
    Simulationists have recently started to employ the term "empathy" when characterizing our most basic understanding of other minds. I agree that empathy is crucial, but I think it is being misconstrued by the simulationists. Using some ideas to be found in Scheler's classical discussion of empathy, I will argue for a different understanding of the notion. More specifically, I will argue that there are basic levels of interpersonal understanding - in particular the understanding of emotional expressions - that are not (...)
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  • Gesturing Makes Learning Last.Susan Wagner Cook, Zachary Mitchell & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):1047-1058.
  • Phenomenology of Perception.M. Merleau-Ponty & Colin Smith - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):372-375.
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  • The Art of Aidagara : Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Quest for an Ontology of Social Existence in Watsuji Tetsurō's Rinrigaku.James M. Shields - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):265-283.
    This paper provides an analysis of the key term aidagara ('betweenness') in the philosophical ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), in response to and in light of the recent movement in Japanese Buddhist studies known as 'Critical Buddhism'. The Critical Buddhist call for a turn away from 'topical' or intuitionist thinking and towards (properly Buddhist) 'critical' thinking, while problematic in its bipolarity, raises the important issue of the place of 'reason' vs 'intuition' in Japanese Buddhist ethics. In this paper, a comparison (...)
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  • Does the Chimpanzee Have a Theory of Mind?David Premack & Guy Woodruff - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):515-526.
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  • Replication and Functionalism.Jane Heal - 1986 - In Jeremy Butterfield (ed.), Language, Mind, and Logic. Cambridge University Press. pp. 135--150.
     
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  • Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons From the Biology of Consciousness.Alva Noë - 2009 - Hill & Wang.
  • The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science.Shaun Gallagher & Dan Zahavi - 2007 - Routledge.
    The Phenomenological Mind is the first book to properly introduce fundamental questions about the mind from the perspective of phenomenology. Key questions and topics covered include: What is phenomenology? naturalizing phenomenology and the empirical cognitive sciences phenomenology and consciousness consciousness and self-consciousness, including perception and action time and consciousness, including William James intentionality the embodied mind action knowledge of other minds situated and extended minds phenomenology and personal identity Interesting and important examples are used throughout, including phantom limb syndrome, blindsight (...)
     
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  • Perceptual Causality and Animacy.Brian J. Scholl & Patrice D. Tremoulet - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (8):299-309.
  • The Role of Gesture in Communication and Thinking.Susan Goldin-Meadow - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (11):419-429.
  • Pre-Reflective Self-as-Subject From Experiential and Empirical Perspectives.Dorothée Legrand - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):583-599.
    In the first part of this paper I characterize a minimal form of self-consciousness, namely pre-reflective self-consciousness. It is a constant structural feature of conscious experience, and corresponds to the consciousness of the self-as-subject that is not taken as an intentional object. In the second part, I argue that contemporary cognitive neuroscience has by and large missed this fundamental form of self-consciousness in its investigation of various forms of self-experience. In the third part, I exemplify how the notion of pre-reflective (...)
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  • Climate and Culture: A Philosophical Study.Tetsurō Watsuji - 1961 - Greenwood Press.
  • Does the Chimpanzee Have a Theory of Mind?David Premack & G. Woodruff - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (4):515-629.
    An individual has a theory of mind if he imputes mental states to himself and others. A system of inferences of this kind is properly viewed as a theory because such states are not directly observable, and the system can be used to make predictions about the behavior of others. As to the mental states the chimpanzee may infer, consider those inferred by our own species, for example, purpose or intention, as well as knowledge, belief, thinking, doubt, guessing, pretending, liking, (...)
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  • Feelings: The Perception of Self.James D. Laird - 2007 - Oup Usa.
    This book aims to pinpoint the connection feelings have with behaviour - a connection that, while clear, has never been fully explained. Following William James, Laird argues that feelings are not the cause of behavior but rather its consequences; the same goes for behaviour and motives and behaviour and attitudes. He presents research into feelings across the spectrum, from anger to joy to fear to romantic love, that support this against-the-grain view. Laird discusses the problem of common sense, self-perception theory, (...)
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  • Enactive Intersubjectivity: Participatory Sense-Making and Mutual Incorporation.Thomas Fuchs & Hanne De Jaegher - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):465-486.
    Current theories of social cognition are mainly based on a representationalist view. Moreover, they focus on a rather sophisticated and limited aspect of understanding others, i.e. on how we predict and explain others’ behaviours through representing their mental states. Research into the ‘social brain’ has also favoured a third-person paradigm of social cognition as a passive observation of others’ behaviour, attributing it to an inferential, simulative or projective process in the individual brain. In this paper, we present a concept of (...)
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  • Levinas in Japan: The Ethics of Alterity and the Philosophy of No-Self.Leah Kalmanson - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):193-206.
    Does the Buddhist doctrine of no-self imply, simply put, no-other? Does this doctrine necessarily come into conflict with an ethics premised on the alterity of the other? This article explores these questions by situating Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics in the context of contemporary Japanese philosophy. The work of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō provides a starting point from which to consider the ethics of the self-other relation in light of the Buddhist notion of emptiness. The philosophy of thirteenth-century Zen Master Dōgen (...)
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  • The Social Self in Japanese Philosophy and American Pragmatism: A Comparative Study of Watsuji Tetsurō and George Herbert Mead.Steve Odin - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (3):475-501.
  • Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity.Jonathan Cole - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle to have others (...)
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  • Direct Perception in the Intersubjective Context.Shaun Gallagher - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):535-543.
    This paper, in opposition to the standard theories of social cognition found in psychology and cognitive science, defends the idea that direct perception plays an important role in social cognition. The two dominant theories, theory theory and simulation theory , both posit something more than a perceptual element as necessary for our ability to understand others, i.e., to “mindread” or “mentalize.” In contrast, certain phenomenological approaches depend heavily on the concept of perception and the idea that we have a direct (...)
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  • Buddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō.William R. Lafleur - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):237 - 250.
  • Embodied Emotion Considered.Paula M. Niedenthal & Marcus Maringer - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (2):122-128.
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  • How Our Hands Help Us Learn.S. Goldinmeadow & S. Wagner - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (5):234-241.
  • On Being the Object of Attention: Implications for Self-Other Consciousness.Vasudevi Reddy - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):397-402.
    Joint attention to an external object at the end of the first year is typically believed to herald the infant's discovery of other people's attention. I will argue that mutual attention in the first months of life already involves an awareness of the directednesss of attention. The self is experienced as the first object of this directedness followed by gradually more distal 'objects'. this view explains early infant affective self-consciousness within mutual attention as emotionally meaningful, rather than as bearing only (...)
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  • Communiaction and Cooperation in Early Infancy: A Description of Primary Intersubjectivity.Colwyn Trevarthen - 1979 - In M. Bullowa (ed.), Before Speech: The beginning of Human Communication. Cambridge University Press.
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  • The Nature of Sympathy.Max Scheler, Peter Heath & W. Stark - 1955 - Philosophical Review 64 (4):671-673.
  • Simulation and Self-Knowledge: A Defence of the Theory-Theory.Peter Carruthers - 1996 - In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 22--38.
    In this chapter I attempt to curb the pretensions of simulationism. I argue that it is, at best, an epistemological doctrine of limited scope. It may explain how we go about attributing beliefs and desires to others, and perhaps to ourselves, in some cases. But simulation cannot provide the fundamental basis of our conception of, or knowledge of, minded agency.
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  • Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading.Alvin Goldman - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):94-97.
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  • Biddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō*: WILLIAM R. LAFLEUR.William R. Lafleur - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):237-250.
    During the past few decades a growing interest in what is often called the ‘Kyoto School’ of philosophy has evidenced itself here and there in the West, especially in discussions of comparative religious thought and in the pages of journals which are sensitive, in the post-colonial world, to the value of giving attention to contemporary thought that originates outside the Anglo-American and continental contexts. What has made the so-called Kyoto School especially interesting is the fact that those thinkers identified with (...)
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  • Beyond Personal Identity Dogen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self.Gereon Kopf - 2001
     
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  • Phenomenology of the Social World.Alfred Schutz - 1967 - Northwestern University Press.
    In this book, his major work, Alfred Schutz attempts to provide a sound philosophical basis for the sociological theories of Max Weber. Using a Husserlian phenomenology, Schutz provides a complete and original analysis of human action and its "intended meaning.".
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  • Simulation and Knowledge of Action.Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.) - 2002 - John Benjamins.
    CHAPTER Simulation theory and mental concepts Alvin I. Goldman Rutgers University. Folk psychology and the TT-ST debate The study of folk psychology, ...
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  • Against Theory of Mind.Ivan Leudar & Alan Costall (eds.) - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • Words, Thoughts, and Theories.Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff - 1999 - Mind 108 (430):395-398.
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  • Contesting the Concept of Consciousness.Steve Torrance - 2009 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (5):111-126.
     
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  • The Invisible Smile: Living Without Facial Expression.Jonathan Cole & Henrietta Spalding - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    We are defined by our faces. They give identity but, equally importantly, reveal our moods and emotions through facial expression. So what happens when the face cannot move? This book is about people who live with Mbius Syndrome, which has as its main feature an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression from birth.
     
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  • The Body Toward an Eastern Mind-Body Theory.Yasuo Yuasa & T. P. Kasulis - 1987
     
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  • Intentions as Emergent Products of Social Interactions.R. W. Gibbs - 2001 - In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 105--122.
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  • Wittgenstein and Other Minds: Rethinking Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity with Wittgenstein, Levinas, and Husserl.Soren Overgaard - 2013 - Routledge.
    A compelling new approach to the problem that has haunted twentieth century philosophy in both its analytical and continental shapes. No other book addresses as thoroughly the parallels between Wittgenstein and leading Continental philosophers such as Levinas, Husserl, and Heidegger.
     
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  • Gesture and Thought.David McNeill - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    David McNeill, a pioneer in the ongoing study of the relationship between gesture and language, here argues that gestures are active participants in both speaking and thinking. He posits that gestures are key ingredients in an “imagery-language dialectic” that fuels speech and thought. The smallest unit of this dialectic is the growth point, a snapshot of an utterance at its beginning psychological stage. In _Gesture and Thought,_ the central growth point comes from a Tweety Bird cartoon. Over the course of (...)
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  • Expression and Empathy.Dan Zahavi - 2007 - In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. pp. 25--40.
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  • Direct Perception in the Intersubjective Context. Commentary. Author's Reply.Raphael van Riel & Shaun Gallagher - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):535-555.
  • Reply to Pierre Jacob.Jerome Dokic - 2002 - In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins. pp. 45--111.
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