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  1. The Value and Pitfalls of Speculation About Science and Technology in Bioethics: The Case of Cognitive Enhancement.Eric Racine, Tristana Martin Rubio, Jennifer Chandler, Cynthia Forlini & Jayne Lucke - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):325-337.
    In the debate on the ethics of the non-medical use of pharmaceuticals for cognitive performance enhancement in healthy individuals there is a clear division between those who view “cognitive enhancement” as ethically unproblematic and those who see such practices as fraught with ethical problems. Yet another, more subtle issue, relates to the relevance and quality of the contribution of scholarly bioethics to this debate. More specifically, how have various forms of speculation, anticipatory ethics, and methods to predict scientific trends and (...)
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  • Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology.C. E. Ayres - 1922 - Journal of Philosophy 19 (17):469-475.
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  • Subjective Outcomes Measurement and Regulatory Oversight for Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.Ghislaine Mathieu, Emily Bell & Eric Racine - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (1):16-18.
  • Instrumentalist Analyses of the Functions of Health Ethics Concepts and Principles: Methodological Guideposts.Eric Racine, M. Ariel Cascio & Aline Bogossian - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):16-18.
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  • Two Problematic Foundations of Neuroethics and Pragmatist Reconstructions.Eric Racine & Matthew Sample - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):566-577.
    Common understandings of neuroethics, i.e., of its distinctive nature, are premised on two distinct sets of claims: (1) neuroscience can change views about the nature of ethics itself and neuroethics is dedicated to reaping such an understanding of ethics; (2) neuroscience poses challenges distinct from other areas of medicine and science and neuroethics tackles those issues. Critiques have rightfully challenged both claims, stressing how the first may lead to problematic forms of reductionism while the second relies on debatable assumptions about (...)
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  • Which Naturalism for Bioethics? A Defense of Moderate (Pragmatic) Naturalism.Eric Racine - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (2):92–100.
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  • Dewey's Theory of Moral Deliberation.James Gouinlock - 1978 - Ethics 88 (3):218-228.
  • Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    The idea that deep brain stimulation induces changes to personality, identity, agency, authenticity, autonomy and self is so deeply entrenched within neuroethics discourses that it has become an unchallenged narrative. In this article, we critically assess evidence about putative effects of DBS on PIAAAS. We conducted a literature review of more than 1535 articles to investigate the prevalence of scientific evidence regarding these potential DBS-induced changes. While we observed an increase in the number of publications in theoretical neuroethics that mention (...)
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  • Dewey's Conception of Growth Reconsidered.Daniel Pekarsky - 1990 - Educational Theory 40 (3):283-294.
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  • Ethics in the Clinical Application of Neural Implants.Cynthia S. Kubu & Paul J. Ford - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):317-321.
    Once a neural implant has shown some efficacy during initial research trials, it begins to enter the world of clinical application. This culminates when the implant becomes approved for a particular indication. However, the ethical challenges continue as the technology is adopted as a standard of practice. Patient eligibility criteria, as documented by inclusion and exclusion criteria with any new treatment, are not always clearly quantified and defined. These vagaries can result in considerable debate regarding who should or should not (...)
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  • I Miss Being Me: Phenomenological Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Frederic Gilbert, Eliza Goddard, John Noel M. Viaña, Adrian Carter & Malcolm Horne - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):96-109.
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  • Beyond Mere Symptom Relief in Deep Brain Stimulation: An Ethical Obligation for Multifaceted Assessment of Outcome.C. S. Kubu & P. J. Ford - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (1):44-49.
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  • Traits and Motives: Toward an Integration of Two Traditions in Personality Research.David G. Winter, Oliver P. John, Abigail J. Stewart, Eva C. Klohnen & Lauren E. Duncan - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (2):230-250.