Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Reasons and Persons.Derek Parfit - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interersts, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating. We often act wrongly, although we know there will be no one with serious grounds for complaint, and when we consider future generations it is very hard to avoid conclusions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2300 citations  
  • Natural Law and Natural Rights.John Finnis - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition includes a substantial postscript by the author, in which he responds to thirty years of discussion, criticism and further work in the field to ...
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   287 citations  
  • Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics.L. W. Sumner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral philosophers agree that welfare matters. But they disagree about what it is, or how much it matters. In this vital new work, Wayne Sumner presents an original theory of welfare, investigating its nature and discussing its importance. He considers and rejects all notable theories of welfare, both objective and subjective, including hedonism and theories founded on desire or preference. His own theory connects welfare closely with happiness or life satisfaction. Reacting against the value pluralism that currently dominates moral philosophy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   251 citations  
  • The Problem of Defective Desires.Chris Heathwood - 2005 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (4):487 – 504.
    The desire-satisfaction theory of welfare says, roughly, that one's life goes well to the extent that one's desires are satisfied. On standard 'actualist' versions of the theory, it doesn't matter what you desire. So long as you are getting what you actually want – whatever it is – things are going well for you. There is widespread agreement that these standard versions are incorrect, because we can desire things that are bad for us -– in other words, because there are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  • Facts, Values, and Norms: Essays Toward a Morality of Consequence.Peter Railton - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    In our everyday lives we struggle with the notions of why we do what we do and the need to assign values to our actions. Somehow, it seems possible through experience and life to gain knowledge and understanding of such matters. Yet once we start delving deeper into the concepts that underwrite these domains of thought and actions, we face a philosophical disappointment. In contrast to the world of facts, values and morality seem insecure, uncomfortably situated, easily influenced by illusion (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Internalism and the Good for a Person.Connie S. Rosati - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):297-326.
    Proponents of numerous recent theories of a person's good hold that a plausible account of the good for a person must satisfy existence internalism. Yet little direct defense has been given for this position. I argue that the principal intuition behind internalism supports a stronger version of the thesis than it might appear--one that effects a "double link" to motivation. I then identify and develop the main arguments that have been or might be given in support of internalism about a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  • Welfare and Rational Care.Stephen Darwall - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    What kind of life best ensures human welfare? Since the ancient Greeks, this question has been as central to ethical philosophy as to ordinary reflection. But what exactly is welfare? This question has suffered from relative neglect. And, as Stephen Darwall shows, it has done so at a price. Presenting a provocative new "rational care theory of welfare," Darwall proves that a proper understanding of welfare fundamentally changes how we think about what is best for people.Most philosophers have assumed that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   84 citations  
  • Natural Law and Practical Rationality.Mark C. Murphy & McDevitt Chair of Religious Philosophy Mark C. Murphy - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Natural law theory has been undergoing a revival, especially in political philosophy and jurisprudence. Yet, most fundamentally, natural law theory is not a political theory, but a moral theory, or more accurately a theory of practical rationality. According to the natural law account of practical rationality, the basic reasons for actions are basic goods that are grounded in the nature of human beings. Practical rationality aims to identify and characterize reasons for action and to explain how choice between actions worth (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Three Faces of Desire.Timothy Schroeder - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard account holds the hedonic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  • Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance.James Griffin - 1986 - Clarendon Press.
    "Well-being," "welfare," "utility," and "quality of life," all closely related concepts, are at the center of morality, politics, law, and economics. Griffin's book, while primarily a volume of moral philosophy, is relevant to all of these subjects. Griffin offers answers to three central questions about well-being: what is the best way to understand it, can it be measured, and where should it fit in moral and political thought. With its breadth of investigation and depth of insight, this work holds significance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   217 citations  
  • Morality and the Human Goods: An Introduction to Natural Law Ethics.Alfonso Gómez-Lobo - 2002 - Georgetown University Press.
    A concise and accessible introduction to natural law ethics, this book introduces readers to the mainstream tradition of Western moral philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Renowned scholar Robert Adams explores the relation between religion and ethics through a comprehensive philosophical account of a theistically-based framework for ethics. Adams' framework begins with the good rather than the right, and with excellence rather than usefulness. He argues that loving the excellent, of which adoring God is a clear example, is the most fundamental aspect of a life well lived. Developing his original and detailed theory, Adams contends that devotion, the sacred, grace, martyrdom, worship, vocation, faith, and other (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   158 citations  
  • Intuition Pumps and the Proper Use of Thought Experiments.Elke Brendel - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (1):89–108.
    I begin with an explication of "thought experiment". I then clarify the role that intuitions play in thought experiments by addressing two important issues: (1) the informativeness of thought experiments and (2) the legitimacy of the method of thought experiments in philosophy and the natural sciences. I defend a naturalistic account of intuitions that provides a plausible explanation of the informativeness of thought experiments, which, in turn, allows thought experiments to be reconstructed as arguments. I also specify criteria for distinguishing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Welfare and Rational Care.Stephen Darwall - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):375-378.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Intuition Pumps and the Proper Use of Thought Experiments.Elke Brendel - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (1):89-108.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Endorsement and Freedom in Amartya Sen's Capability Approach.Serena Olsaretti - 2005 - Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):89-108.
    A central question for assessing the merits of Amartya Sen's capability approach as a potential answer to the “distribution of what”? question concerns the exact role and nature of freedom in that approach. Sen holds that a person's capability identifies that person's effective freedom to achieve valuable states of beings and doings, or functionings, and that freedom so understood, rather than achieved functionings themselves, is the primary evaluative space. Sen's emphasis on freedom has been criticised by G. A. Cohen, according (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Persons, Perspectives, and Full Information Accounts of the Good.Connie S. Rosati - 1995 - Ethics 105 (2):296-325.
  • Facts, Values, and Norms.Peter Railton - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 126 (3):433-448.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations