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  1. Reasons and Persons.Derek Parfit - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interersts, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating. We often act wrongly, although we know there will be no one with serious grounds for complaint, and when we consider future generations it is very hard to avoid conclusions (...)
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  • Endangering Humanity: An International Crime?Catriona McKinnon - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2-3):395-415.
    In the Anthropocene, human beings are capable of bringing about globally catastrophic outcomes that could damage conditions for present and future human life on Earth in unprecedented ways. This paper argues that the scale and severity of these dangers justifies a new international criminal offence of ‘postericide’ that would protect present and future people against wrongfully created dangers of near extinction. Postericide is committed by intentional or reckless systematic conduct that is fit to bring about near human extinction. The paper (...)
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  • A Theory of Crimes Against Humanity.David Luban - unknown
    The answer I offer in this Article is that crimes against humanity assault one particular aspect of human being, namely our character as political animals. We are creatures whose nature compels us to live socially, but who cannot do so without artificial political organization that inevitably poses threats to our well-being, and, at the limit, to our very survival. Crimes against humanity represent the worst of those threats; they are the limiting case of politics gone cancerous. Precisely because we cannot (...)
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  • Crimes Against Humanity: A Normative Account. [REVIEW]Larry May - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (1):155-163.
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  • Emergencies and Politics: A Sober Hobbesian Approach.Tom Sorell - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Tom Sorell argues that emergencies can justify types of action that would normally be regarded as wrong. Beginning with the ethics of emergencies facing individuals, he explores the range of effective and legitimate private emergency response and its relation to public institutions, such as national governments. He develops a theory of the response of governments to public emergencies which indicates the possibility of a democratic politics that is liberal but that takes seriously threats to life and limb (...)
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  • Two Distinctions in Goodness.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (2):169-195.
  • What is Security?Emma Rothschild - 1995
     
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  • Book Review:Basic Rights: Subsistence, Affluence, and U.S. Foreign Policy. Henry Shue. [REVIEW]Arthur Kuflik - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):319-.
  • Authority and Responsibility in International Criminal Law.Antony Duff - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
  • Two Distinctions in Goodness.Christine Korsgaard - 1997 - In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the Good Life. Oup Usa.
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  • Death and the Afterlife.Samuel Scheffler - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    We normally take it for granted that other people will live on after we ourselves have died. Even if we do not believe in a personal afterlife in which we survive our own deaths, we assume that there will be a "collective afterlife" in which humanity survives long after we are gone. Samuel Scheffler maintains that this assumption plays a surprising - indeed astonishing - role in our lives.
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  • Should We Tolerate Climate Change Denial?Catriona McKinnon - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):205-216.
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  • Reasons and Persons.Joseph Margolis - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (2):311-327.
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  • Coping with the Unpredictable Effects of Future Technologies.Sven Ove Hansson - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):137-149.
    Available methods such as technology assessment and risk analysis have failed to predict the effects of technological choices. We need to give up the futile predictive ambitions of previous approaches and instead base decisions on systematic studies of alternative future developments. It will then be necessary to cope with mere possibility arguments, i.e., arguments in which a conclusion is drawn from a mere possibility that a course of action may have certain consequences. A five-step procedure is proposed for the assessment (...)
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  • Crimes Against Humanity and the Limits of International Criminal Law.Massimo Renzo - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (4):443-476.
    Crimes against humanity are supposed to have a collective dimension with respect both to their victims and their perpetrators. According to the orthodox view, these crimes can be committed by individuals against individuals, but only in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against the group to which the victims belong. In this paper I offer a new conception of crimes against humanity and a new justification for their international prosecution. This conception has important implications as to which crimes (...)
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  • Basic Rights: Subsistence, Affluence, and U.S. Foreign Policy.Henry Shue & Theodore M. Benditt - 1980 - Law and Philosophy 4 (1):125-140.
     
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  • Astronomical Waste: The Opportunity Cost of Delayed Technological Development: Nick Bostrom.Nick Bostrom - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (3):308-314.
    With very advanced technology, a very large population of people living happy lives could be sustained in the accessible region of the universe. For every year that development of such technologies and colonization of the universe is delayed, there is therefore a corresponding opportunity cost: a potential good, lives worth living, is not being realized. Given some plausible assumptions, this cost is extremely large. However, the lesson for standard utilitarians is not that we ought to maximize the pace of technological (...)
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  • Security as a Basic Right (After 9/11).Jeremy Waldron - 2009 - In Charles R. Beitz & Robert E. Goodin (eds.), Global Basic Rights. Oxford University Press.
  • Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value.Michael J. Zimmerman - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  • Reckleness in Attempts.R. A. Duff - 1995 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 15 (2):309-325.
  • Problems of Population Theory:Obligations to Future Generations. R. I. Sikora, Brian Barry.Jefferson McMahan - 1981 - Ethics 92 (1):96-.
  • A Defense of International Criminal Law.Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2004 - Ethics 115 (1):35-67.
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  • Wronging Future People: A Contractualist Proposal.Rahul Kumar - 2009 - In Gosseries Axel & Meyers L. (eds.), Intergenerational Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 251--272.
     
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  • The Correlativity of Rights and Duties.David Lyons - 1970 - Noûs 4 (1):45-55.
  • Crimes Against Humanity: A Normative Account.Larry May - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):603-610.
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  • Reducing the Risk of Human Extinction.Jason G. Matheny - unknown
    In this century a number of events could extinguish humanity. The probability of these events may be very low, but the expected value of preventing them could be high, as it represents the value of all future human lives. We review the challenges to studying human extinction risks and, by way of example, estimate the cost effectiveness of preventing extinction-level asteroid impacts.
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  • Contractualist Proposal.Rahul Kumar - 2009 - In Gosseries Axel & Meyers L. (eds.), Intergenerational Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 251.
     
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