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  1. The Social Brain Meets the Reactive Genome: Neuroscience, Epigenetics and the New Social Biology.Maurizio Meloni - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
    The rise of molecular epigenetics over the last few years promises to bring the discourse about the sociality and susceptibility to environmental influences of the brain to an entirely new level. Epigenetics deals with molecular mechanisms such as gene expression, which may embed in the organism “memories” of social experiences and environmental exposures. These changes in gene expression may be transmitted across generations without changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetics is the most advanced example of the new postgenomic and context-dependent (...)
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  • Disentangling Life: Darwin, Selectionism, and the Postgenomic Return of the Environment.Maurizio Meloni - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 62:10-19.
    In this paper, I analyze the disruptive impact of Darwinian selectionism for the century-long tradition in which the environment had a direct causative role in shaping an organism’s traits. In the case of humans, the surrounding environment often determined not only the physical, but also the mental and moral features of individuals and whole populations. With its apparatus of indirect effects, random variations, and a much less harmonious view of nature and adaptation, Darwinian selectionism severed the deep imbrication of organism (...)
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  • The Neurosociology of Auguste Comte.Ryan McVeigh - 2020 - Social Science Information 59 (2):329-354.
    This article explores the role of phrenology in the work of Auguste Comte. I begin by reviewing the historical and contemporary significance of this doctrine to show the direct lineage that exists between phrenology and what we now call cognitive neuroscience. I then demonstrate the impact of phrenology on Comte’s sociological theory and make the claim that his paradigm exemplifies what TenHouten called ‘neurosociology.’ Following this, I show how Comte’s social epistemology rejected biological reductionism and considered neurophysiology a subfield of (...)
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  • From Comte to Baudrillard.Andrew Wernick - 2000 - Theory, Culture and Society 17 (6):55-75.
    The article offers a critical but sympathetic reflection on the development of classical and post-classical French sociology. From Comte onwards, I suggest, the modern French treatment of the social has been preoccupied with socio-theological questions; and even with the radical deconstruction of any society-god, this continues to be the case. There are distinctive historical reasons for this ; but the significance of the issues raised by this intellectual tradition as a result goes beyond the limits of national context. In an (...)
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  • Weismann Rules! OK? Epigenetics and the Lamarckian Temptation.David Haig - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):415-428.
    August Weismann rejected the inheritance of acquired characters on the grounds that changes to the soma cannot produce the kind of changes to the germ-plasm that would result in the altered character being transmitted to subsequent generations. His intended distinction, between germ-plasm and soma, was closer to the modern distinction between genotype and phenotype than to the modern distinction between germ cells and somatic cells. Recently, systems of epigenetic inheritance have been claimed to make possible the inheritance of acquired characters. (...)
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  • The Godfather of “Occidentality”: Auguste Comte and the Idea of “the West”.Georgios Varouxakis - 2019 - Modern Intellectual History 16 (2):411-441.
    Recent theories concerning the origins of the idea of “the West” have missed the most important link in the story, the writings and tireless propagandizing efforts of Auguste Comte. It was Comte who first developed an explicit and elaborate idea of “the West” as a sociopolitical concept, basing it on a historical analysis of the development of the “vanguard” of humanity and proposing a detailed plan for the reorganization of that portion of the world, before it could serve the rest (...)
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  • The Political Self: Auguste Comte and Phrenology.Richard Vernon - 1986 - History of European Ideas 7 (3):271-286.
  • Milieu and Ambiance: An Essay in Historical Semantics.Leo Spitzer - 1942 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (1):1-42.
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  • Le penchant biologique de la sociologie comtienne : La question de l'égalité des sexes.Vincent Guillin - 2012 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 65 (2):259-285.
  • The Theory of Environment: Part I, An Outline of the History of the Idea of Milieu, and its Present Status.Armin Hajmin Koller - 1918 - Philosophical Review 27:670.
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  • It is What It Eats: Chemically Defined Media and the History of Surrounds.Hannah Landecker - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 57:148-160.
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  • From 'Circumstances' to 'Environment': Herbert Spencer and the Origins of the Idea of Organism–Environment Interaction.Trevor Pearce - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):241-252.
    The word ‘environment’ has a history. Before the mid-nineteenth century, the idea of a singular, abstract entity—the organism—interacting with another singular, abstract entity—the environment—was virtually unknown. In this paper I trace how the idea of a plurality of external conditions or circumstances was replaced by the idea of a singular environment. The central figure behind this shift, at least in Anglo-American intellectual life, was the philosopher Herbert Spencer. I examine Spencer’s work from 1840 to 1855, demonstrating that he was exposed (...)
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  • Milieu and Ambiance: An Essay in Historical Semantics.Leo Spitzer - 1942 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (2):169-218.
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  • La théorie cérébrale d'un naturaliste spiritualiste, Henri-Marie Ducrotay de Blainville.Laurent Clauzade - 2012 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 65 (2):237-257.
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  • Late Nineteenth-Century Lamarckism and French Sociology.Snait Gissis - 2002 - Perspectives on Science 10 (1):69-122.
    : The transfer of modes of thought, concepts, models, and metaphors from Darwinian and Lamarckian evolutionary biology played a significant role in the mergence, constitution, and legitimization of sociology as an autonomous discipline in France at the end of the nineteenth century. More specifically, the Durkheimian group then came to be recognized as "French sociology." In the present paper, I analyze a facet of the struggle among various groups for this coveted status and demonstrate that the initial adherence to and (...)
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