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  1. Understanding Responsible Management: Emerging Themes and Variations From European Business School Programs.Guénola Nonet, Kerul Kassel & Lucas Meijs - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (4):717-736.
    Our literature review reveals a call for changes in business education to encourage responsible management. The Principles for Responsible Management Education were developed in 2007 under the coordination of the United Nations Global Compact, AACSB International, and other leading academic institutions for the purpose of promoting responsible management in education. Literature review shows that responsible management as such remains undefined. This gap in literature leads potentially to an absence of clarity in research, education, and management, regarding responsible management among scholars (...)
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  • The ‘Biophilic Organization’: An Integrative Metaphor for Corporate Sustainability.David R. Jones - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):401-416.
    This paper proposes a new organizational metaphor, the ‘Biophilic Organization’, which aims to counter the bio-cultural disconnection of many organizations despite their espoused commitment to sustainability. This conceptual research draws on multiple disciplines such as evolutionary psychology and architecture to not only develop a diverse bio-cultural connection but to show how this connection tackles sustainability, in a holistic and systemic sense. Moreover, the paper takes an integrative view of sustainability, which effectively means that it embraces the different emergent tensions. Three (...)
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  • The Circular Economy: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Concept and Application in a Global Context.Alan Murray, Keith Skene & Kathryn Haynes - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):369-380.
    There have long been calls from industry for guidance in implementing strategies for sustainable development. The Circular Economy represents the most recent attempt to conceptualize the integration of economic activity and environmental wellbeing in a sustainable way. This set of ideas has been adopted by China as the basis of their economic development, escalating the concept in minds of western policymakers and NGOs. This paper traces the conceptualisations and origins of the Circular Economy, tracing its meanings, and exploring its antecedents (...)
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  • A Multi-Level Perspective for the Integration of Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability (ECSRS) in Management Education.Dolors Setó-Pamies & Eleni Papaoikonomou - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):523-538.
    In recent years, much discussion has taken place regarding the social role of firms and their responsibilities to society. In this context, the role of universities is crucial, as it may shape management students’ attitudes and provide them with the necessary knowledge, skills and critical analysis to make decisions as consumers and future professionals. We emphasise that universities are multi-level learning environments, so there is a need to look beyond formal curricular content and pay more attention to implicit dimensions of (...)
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  • From Responsible Management to Responsible Organizations: The Democratic Principle for Managing Organizational Ethics.Maarten J. Verkerk, Jan De Leede & Andre H. J. Nijhof - 2001 - Business and Society Review 106 (4):353-378.
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  • Feelings That Make a Difference: How Guilt and Pride Convince Consumers of the Effectiveness of Sustainable Consumption Choices.Paolo Antonetti & Stan Maklan - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):117-134.
    A significant body of research concludes that stable beliefs of perceived consumer effectiveness lead to sustainable consumption choices. Consumers who believe that their decisions can significantly affect environmental and social issues are more likely to behave sustainably. Little is known, however, about how perceived consumer effectiveness can be increased. We find that feelings of guilt and pride, activated by a single consumption episode, can regulate sustainable consumption by affecting consumers’ general perception of effectiveness. This paper demonstrates the impact that guilt (...)
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  • Driven to Be Good: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective on the Drivers of Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Jacob Brower & Vijay Mahajan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):313-331.
    Despite growing evidence of the benefits to a firm of improving corporate social performance (CSP), many firms vary significantly in terms of their CSP activities. This research investigates how the characteristics of the stakeholder landscape influence a firm’s CSP breadth. Using stakeholder theory, we specifically propose that several factors increase the salience and impact of stakeholders’ demands on the firm and that, in response to these factors, a firm’s CSP will have greater breadth. A firm’s CSP breadth is operationalized as (...)
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  • Leaving the Road to Abilene: A Pragmatic Approach to Addressing the Normative Paradox of Responsible Management Education.Dirk C. Moosmayer, Sandra Waddock, Long Wang, Matthias P. Hühn, Claus Dierksmeier & Christopher Gohl - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (4):913-932.
    We identify a normative paradox of responsible management education. Business educators aim to promote social values and develop ethical habits and socially responsible mindsets through education, but they attempt to do so with theories that have normative underpinnings and create actual normative effects that counteract their intentions. We identify a limited conceptualization of freedom in economic theorizing as a cause of the paradox. Economic theory emphasizes individual freedom and understands this as the freedom to choose from available options. However, conceptualizing (...)
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  • Is Institutional Ownership Related to Corporate Social Responsibility? The Nonlinear Relation and Its Implication for Stock Return Volatility.Maretno Harjoto, Hoje Jo & Yongtae Kim - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):77-109.
    This study examines the relation between corporate social responsibility and institutional investor ownership, and the impact of this relation on stock return volatility. We find that institutional ownership does not strictly increase or decrease in CSR; rather, institutional ownership is a concave function of CSR. This evidence suggests that institutional investors do not see CSR as strictly value-enhancing activities. Institutional investors adjust their percentage of ownership when CSR activities go beyond the perceived optimal level. Employing the path analysis, we also (...)
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  • When Does It Pay to Be Good? Moderators and Mediators in the Corporate Sustainability–Corporate Financial Performance Relationship: A Critical Review.Sylvia Grewatsch & Ingo Kleindienst - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):383-416.
    In this paper, we review the literature on moderators and mediators in the corporate sustainability –corporate financial performance relationship. We provide some clarity on what has been learned so far by taking a contingency perspective on this much-researched relationship. Overall, we find that this research has made some progress in the past. However, we also find this research stream to be characterized by three major shortcomings, namely low degree of novelty, missing investment in theory building, and a lack of research (...)
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  • Humanizing Business Through Emotions: On the Role of Emotions in Ethics. [REVIEW]Yotam Lurie - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):1-11.
    Emotions have not received sufficient attention in business ethics. This paper identifies the positive role of emotions in human judgment and attitudes. It then argues that emotions as well as feelings on the part of managers and their employees can be positive forces for both business managers and for the organizations they lead. Allowing emotions a stronger role in business affairs could serve in putting a more human face on both managers and their organizations.
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  • The Impossibility of the Separation Thesis.Jared D. Harris & R. Edward Freeman - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):541-548.
    Distinguishing “business” concerns from “ethical” values is not only an unfruitful and meaningless task, it is also an impossible endeavor. Nevertheless, fruitless attempts to separate facts from values produce detrimental second-order effects, both for theory and practice, and should therefore be abandoned. We highlight examples of exemplary research that integrate economic and moral considerations, and point the way to a business ethics discipline that breaks new groundby putting ideas and narratives about business together with ideas and narratives about ethics.
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  • A Paradox Perspective on Corporate Sustainability: Descriptive, Instrumental, and Normative Aspects.Tobias Hahn, Frank Figge, Jonatan Pinkse & Lutz Preuss - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):235-248.
    The last decade has witnessed the emergence of a paradox perspective on corporate sustainability. By explicitly acknowledging tensions between different desirable, yet interdependent and conflicting sustainability objectives, a paradox perspective enables decision makers to achieve competing sustainability objectives simultaneously and creates leeway for superior business contributions to sustainable development. In stark contrast to the business case logic, a paradox perspective does not establish emphasize business considerations over concerns for environmental protection and social well-being at the societal level. In order to (...)
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  • Responsible Management: Engaging Moral Reflexive Practice Through Threshold Concepts.Paul Hibbert & Ann Cunliffe - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):177-188.
    In this conceptual paper we argue that, to date, principles of responsible management have not impacted practice as anticipated because of a disconnect between knowledge and practice. This disconnect means that an awareness of ethical concerns, by itself, does not help students take personal responsibility for their actions. We suggest that an abstract knowledge of principles has to be supplemented by an engaged understanding of the responsibility of managers and leaders to actively challenge irresponsible practices. We argue that a form (...)
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  • New Ways of Teaching: Using Technology and Mobile Apps to Educate on Societal Grand Challenges.Ivan Montiel, Javier Delgado-Ceballos, Natalia Ortiz-de-Mandojana & Raquel Antolin-Lopez - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (2):243-251.
    We use this editorial essay as a call for a more effective use of new technologies, such as mobile apps and Web 2.0 tools, to educate students and other relevant stakeholders on business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability topics. We identify three overarching reasons that justify the need for new ways of teaching that further incorporate technology to foster the innovative thinking needed to tackle imminent societal grand challenges such as climate change and increasing inequality. First, we are facing (...)
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  • To Thine Own Self Be True? Employees’ Judgments of the Authenticity of Their Organization’s Corporate Social Responsibility Program.Lindsay McShane & Peggy Cunningham - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):81-100.
    Despite recognizing the importance of developing authentic corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, noticeably absent from the literature is consideration for how employees distinguish between authentic and inauthentic CSR programs. This is somewhat surprising given that employees are essentially the face of their organization and are largely expected to act as ambassadors for the organization’s CSR program (Collier and Esteban in Bus Ethics 16:19–33, 2007 ). The current research, by conducting depth interviews with employees, builds a better understanding of how employees (...)
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  • Will Women Lead the Way? Differences in Demand for Corporate Social Responsibility Information for Investment Decisions.Leda Nath, Lori Holder-Webb & Jeffrey Cohen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):85-102.
    Recent years have featured a leap in academic and public interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities and related corporate reporting. Two main themes in this literature are the exploration of management incentives to engage in and disclose this information, and of the use and value of this information to market participants. We extend the second theme by examining the interest that specific investor classes have in the use of CSR information. We rely on feminist intersectionality, which suggests that gender (...)
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  • Responsible Management, Incentive Systems, and Productivity.Ivan Hilliard - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):365-377.
    A disconnect remains between theories about responsible management and application in real-life organizations. Part of the reason is due to the complexity and holistic nature of the field, and the fact that many of the benefits of aligning business objectives with changing societal conditions are of an intangible nature. Human resource management is an increasingly important part of the field with benefits including talent retention, higher levels of motivation, and improvements in organizational cohesion. This paper sets out an experiment run (...)
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  • The Role of CEO’s Personal Incentives in Driving Corporate Social Responsibility.Michele Fabrizi, Christine Mallin & Giovanna Michelon - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):311-326.
    In this study, we explore the role of Chief Executive Officers’ incentives, split between monetary and non-monetary, in relation to corporate social responsibility. We base our analysis on a sample of 597 US firms over the period 2005–2009. We find that both monetary and non-monetary incentives have an effect on CSR decisions. Specifically, monetary incentives designed to align the CEO’s and shareholders’ interests have a negative effect on CSR and non-monetary incentives have a positive effect on CSR. The study has (...)
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  • The Field of Business Sustainability and the Death Drive: A Radical Intervention.Alan Bradshaw & Detlev Zwick - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):267-279.
    We argue that the gap between an authentically ethical conviction of sustainability and a behaviour that avoids confronting the terrifying reality of its ethical point of reference is characteristic of the field of business sustainability. We do not accuse the field of business sustainability of ethical shortcomings on the account of this attitude–behaviour gap. If anything, we claim the opposite, namely that there resides an ethical sincerity in the convictions of business scholars to entrust capitalism and capitalists with the mammoth (...)
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  • Fraud in Sustainability Departments? An Exploratory Study.Maria Steinmeier - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):477-492.
    While sustainability is largely associated with do-gooders, this article discusses whether and how fraud might also be an issue in sustainability departments. More specifically, transferring the concept of the fraud triangle to sustainability departments I discuss possible pressures/incentives, opportunities, and rationalizations/attitudes for sustainability managers to commit fraud. Based on interviews with sustainability and forensic practitioners, my findings suggest that sustainability managers face mounting pressure and have opportunities to manipulate due to an immature control environment. Whether a presumably morality-driven attitude may (...)
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  • Corporate Sustainability: A View From the Top.Arménio Rego, Miguel Pina E. Cunha & Daniel Polónia - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):133-157.
    Through a qualitative approach, we explore the perspective of 72 CEOs of companies operating in Portugal about the definition of corporate sustainability and its facilitators, and obtain four main findings. First, most CEOs equate CS with the company’s continuity/viability. Second, the relevance ascribed to different stakeholders differs considerably: while more than 50 % of CEOs cited shareholders/profits, and more than 40 % mentioned the natural environment and employees, very few mentioned customers, society, suppliers, the State, or competitors. Third, the management (...)
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  • Cannibals with Forks: The Triple Bottom Line of 21st Century Business.John Elkington - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):229-231.
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  • The Role of Short-Termism and Uncertainty Avoidance in Organizational Inaction on Climate Change: A Multi-Level Framework.Subhabrata Bobby Banerjee, Timo Busch, Jonatan Pinkse & Natalie Slawinski - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (2):253-282.
    Despite increasing pressure to deal with climate change, firms have been slow to respond with effective action. This article presents a multi-level framework for a better understanding of why many firms are failing to reduce their absolute greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to climate change. The concepts of short-termism and uncertainty avoidance from research in psychology, sociology, and organization theory can explain the phenomenon of organizational inaction on climate change. Antecedents related to short-termism and uncertainty avoidance reinforce one another at (...)
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  • The Impact of Choice Architecture on Sustainable Consumer Behavior: The Role of Guilt.Aristeidis Theotokis & Emmanouela Manganari - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):423-437.
    Companies often encourage consumers to engage in sustainable behaviors using their services in a more environmentally friendly or green way, such as reusing the towels in a hotel or replacing paper bank statements by electronic statements. Sometimes, the option of green service is implied as the default and consumers can opt-out, while in other cases consumers need to explicitly ask for switching to a green service. This research examines the effectiveness of choice architecture and particularly the different default policies—i.e., the (...)
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