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  1. Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
    As I write this, in November 1971, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical caxc. The suffering and death that are occurring there now axe not inevitable, 1101; unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refugees; nevertheless, it is not beyond Lhe capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to (...)
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  • The Central States College Association Program Report on Teaching Philosophy in High School. Dooley - 1969 - Journal of Critical Analysis 1 (1):13-20.
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  • The Transition From Studying Philosophy to Doing Philosophy.John Rudisill - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (3):241-271.
    In this paper I articulate a minimal conception of the idea of doing philosophy that informs a curriculum and pedagogy for producing students who are capable of engaging in philosophical activity and not just competent with a specific domain of knowledge. The paper then relates, by way of background, the departmental assessment practices that have played a vital role in the development of my department’s current curriculum and in particular in the design of a junior-year seminar in philosophical research required (...)
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  • Philosophy Has Consequences! Developing Metacognition and Active Learning in the Ethics Classroom.Patrick Stokes - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):143-169.
    The importance of enchancing metacognition and encouraging active learning in philosophy teaching has been increasingly recognised in recent years. Yet traditional teaching methods have not always centralised helping students to become reflectively and critically aware of the quality and consistency of their own thinking. This is particularly relevant when teaching moral philosophy, where apparently inconsistent intuitions and responses are common. In this paper I discuss the theoretical basis of the relevance of metacognition and active learning for teaching moral philosophy. Applying (...)
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  • Student Relativism: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.Brian Talbot - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):171-187.
    I present a novel approach to teaching ethics to students who are moral relativists. I argue that we should not try to convince students to abandon moral relativism; while we can and should present arguments against the view, we should not try to use these arguments to change students’ minds. Attempts to convince student relativists to change their minds can be disrespectful, and often overlook the reasons why students are relativists. I explain how instead to show moral relativists that their (...)
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  • Teaching the Practical Relevance of Propositional Logic.Marvin J. Croy - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (3):253-270.
    This article advances the view that propositional logic can and should be taught within general education logic courses in ways that emphasizes its practical usefulness, much beyond what commonly occurs in logic textbooks. Discussion and examples of this relevance include database searching, understanding structured documents, and integrating concepts of proof construction with argument analysis. The underlying rationale for this approach is shown to have import for questions concerning the design of logic courses, textbooks, and the general education curriculum, particularly the (...)
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  • Deliberating with Critical Friends: A Strategy for Teaching Deliberative Democratic Theory.Shane Ralston - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):393-410.
    Standard methods for teaching Deliberative Democratic Theory in the philosophy classroom include presenting theories in the historical order in which they originated, by theorist or in various thematic categories, including criticisms of the theories. However, if Simone Chambers is correct and DDT has truly entered “a working theory stage,” whereby the theory and practice of deliberation receive equal consideration, then such approaches may no longer be appropriate for teaching DDT. I propose that DDT be taught using the Critical Friends discussion (...)
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  • Teaching for Argumentative Thought.Shelagh Crooks - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):247-261.
    The conception of thought as a kind of argumentative dialogue has been influential in curricula designed to promote the development of thinking skills. Educators have sought to “teach” this kind of thinking by providing their students with opportunities to participate in argumentative exchange. This practice is based on the belief that thinking processes will mirror or mimic the interpersonal exchanges in which the thinker engages. In this article, another approach to teaching argumentative thought is developed. It is argued that while (...)
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  • Looking for a Fight.Kurt Mosser - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):343-362.
    This exercise requires students—particularly in Introduction to Philosophy courses—to use Internet chatrooms in an “agonistic” fashion,actively seeking out others with whom to argue. Generally using topics in applied ethics, students develop skills in articulating their positions, providing evidence to support those positions, and presenting arguments. These Internet exchanges have resulted in improvement in students’ critical thinking skills, writing, and classroom discussion, and have revealed the value of defending a position with a dispassionate, well-reasoned argument.
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  • Looking for a Fight: An Agonistic Strategy for Teaching.Kurt Mosser - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):343-362.
    This exercise requires students—particularly in Introduction to Philosophy courses—to use Internet chatrooms in an “agonistic” fashion,actively seeking out others with whom to argue. Generally using topics in applied ethics, students develop skills in articulating their positions, providing evidence to support those positions, and presenting arguments. These Internet exchanges have resulted in improvement in students’ critical thinking skills, writing, and classroom discussion, and have revealed the value of defending a position with a dispassionate, well-reasoned argument.
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  • How Neutral is Discussion?Stephen L. Esquith - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 11 (3):193-208.
  • The Limits of Morality.Michael Slote - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):915-917.
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  • Moorean Facts and Belief Revision, or Can the Skeptic Win?Thomas Kelly - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):179-209.
    A Moorean fact, in the words of the late David Lewis, is ‘one of those things that we know better than we know the premises of any philosophical argument to the contrary’. Lewis opens his seminal paper ‘Elusive Knowledge’ with the following declaration.
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  • The Ethics of Argumentation.Vasco Correia - 2012 - Informal Logic 32 (2):222-241.
    Normative theories of argumentation tend to assume that logical and dialectical rules suffice to ensure the rationality of argumentative discourse. Yet, in everyday debates people use arguments that seem valid in light of such rules but nonetheless biased and tendentious. This article seeks to show that the rationality of argumentation can only be fully promoted if we take into account its ethical dimension. To substantiate this claim, I review some of the empirical evidence indicating that people’s inferential reasoning is systematically (...)
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  • Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong.John Leslie Mackie - 1977 - Penguin Books.
    John Mackie's stimulating book is a complete and clear treatise on moral theory. His writings on normative ethics-the moral principles he recommends-offer a fresh approach on a much neglected subject, and the work as a whole is undoubtedly a major contribution to modern philosophy.The author deals first with the status of ethics, arguing that there are not objective values, that morality cannot be discovered but must be made. He examines next the content of ethics, seeing morality as a functional device, (...)
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  • Trivial Sacrifices, Great Demands.William Sin - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (1):3-15.
    Suppose that people in the affluent countries can easily save the lives of the starving needy in poor countries. Then, three points seem to follow. First, it is wrong for these people not to make the easy rescue . Second, it is wrong to stop making the easy rescue even if they have made many rescues already . Third, if we accept the first two points, the demands of morality are super-extreme. That is, people have to keep making trivial sacrifices (...)
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  • Moral Realism.Peter Railton - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (2):163-207.
    The question of moral realismwhether our ethical beliefs rest on some objective foundationis one that mattered as much to Aristotle as it does to us today, and his writings on this topic continue to provide inspiration for the contemporary debate. This volume of essays expands the fruitful conversation among scholars of ancient philosophy and contemporary ethical theorists on this question and related issues such as the virtues, justice, and Aristotles theory of tragedy.The distinguished contributors to this volume enrich and clarify (...)
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  • The Second-Person Standpoint: Morality, Respect, and Accountability.Stephen Darwall - 2006 - Harvard University Press.
    The result is nothing less than a fundamental reorientation of moral theory that enables it at last to account for morality's supreme authority--an account that ...
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  • Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In 1972, the young philosopher Peter Singer published "Famine, Affluence and Morality," which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics. Through this article, Singer presents his view that we have the same moral obligations to those far away as we do to those close to us. He argued that choosing not to send life-saving money to starving people on the other side of the earth is the moral equivalent of neglecting to save drowning children because (...)
     
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  • The Limits of Morality.Shelly Kagan - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    Most people believe that there are limits to the sacrifices that morality can demand. Although it would often be meritorious, we are not, in fact, morally required to do all that we can to promote overall good. What's more, most people also believe that certain types of acts are simply forbidden, morally off limits, even when necessary for promoting the overall good. In this provocative analysis Kagan maintains that despite the intuitive appeal of these views, they cannot be adequately defended. (...)
  • Law's Empire.Ken Kress - 1986 - Ethics 97 (4):834-860.
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  • Aggregation, Partiality, and the Strong Beneficence Principle.Dale Dorsey - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (1):139 - 157.
    Consider the Strong Beneficence Principle (SBP): Persons of affluent means ought to give to those who might fail basic human subsistence until the point at which they must give up something of comparable moral importance. This principle has been the subject of much recent discussion. In this paper, I argue that no coherent interpretation of SBP can be found. SBP faces an interpretive trilemma, each horn of which should be unacceptable to fans of SBP; SBP is either (a) so strong (...)
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  • Law's Empire.R. DWORKIN - 1986 - Harvard University Press.
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  • The Problem of the Criterion.Roderick M. Chisholm - 1973 - Milwaukee, Marquette University Press.
  • Good Samaritans, Good Humanitarians.Scott M. James - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):238–254.
    Duties of beneficence are not well understood. Peter Singer has argued that the scope of beneficence should not be restricted to those who are, in some sense, near us. According to Singer, refusing to contribute to humanitarian relief efforts is just as wrong as refusing to rescue a child drowning before you. Most people do not seem convinced by Singer’s arguments, yet no one has offered a plausible justification for restricting the scope of beneficence that doesn’t produce counterintuitive results elsewhere. (...)
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  • Moral Community: Escaping the Ethical State of Nature.Kyla Ebels-Duggan - 2009 - Philosophers' Imprint 9.
    I attempt to vindicate our authority to create new practical reasons for others by making choices of own own. In The Doctrine of Right Kant argues that we have an obligation to leave the Juridical State of Nature and found the state. In a less familiar passage in Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason he argues for an obligation to leave what he calls the Ethical State of Nature and join together in the Moral Community. I read both texts (...)
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  • .Peter Railton - 1985 - Rowman & Littlefield.
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  • A Defense of the Ethics of Contemporary Debate.Star A. Muir - 1993 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 26 (4):277 - 295.
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