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  1. Suffering Injustice: Misrecognition as Moral Injury in Critical Theory.J. M. Bernstein - 2005 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):303 – 324.
    It is the persistence of social suffering in a world in which it could be eliminated that for Adorno is the source of the need for critical reflection, for philosophy. Philosophy continues and gains its cultural place because an as yet unbridgeable abyss separates the social potential for the relief of unnecessary human suffering and its emphatic continuance. Philosophy now is the culturally bound repository for the systematic acknowledgement and articulation of the meaning of the expanse of human suffering within (...)
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  • Hegel. [REVIEW]George Amstrong Kelly - 1975 - Political Theory 4 (3):377-381.
  • Reason, Recognition, and Internal Critique.Antti Kauppinen - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):479 – 498.
    Normative political philosophy always refers to a standard against which a society's institutions are judged. In the first, analytical part of the article, the different possible forms of normative criticism are examined according to whether the standards it appeals to are external or internal to the society in question. In the tradition of Socrates and Hegel, it is argued that reconstructing the kind of norms that are implicit in practices enables a critique that does not force the critic's particular views (...)
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  • Interpersonal Recognition: A Response to Value or a Precondition of Personhood?Arto Laitinen - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):463 – 478.
    This article suggests first that the concept of interpersonal recognition be understood in a multidimensional (as opposed to one-dimensional), practical (as opposed to symbolic), and strict (as opposed to broad) way. Second, it is argued that due recognition be seen as a reason-governed response to evaluative features, rather than all normativity and reasons being seen as generated by recognition. This can be called a response-model, or, more precisely, a value-based model of due recognition. A further suggestion is that there is (...)
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  • On the Genus and Species of Recognition.Heikki Ikäheimo - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):447-462.
    This article makes several conceptual proposals for a closer analysis of recognition more or less in line with Axel Honneth's account of recognition: (1) a proposal as to the genus of recognitional attitude and recognition, (2) a sketch of an analytical scheme intended to be heuristically useful for analysing the different species of recognitional attitude and recognition, (3) some proposals as to the precise contents of self-conceptions involved in each species and subspecies of recognition, and (4) suggestions as to the (...)
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  • Critical Remarks on The Sources of the Self by Charles Taylor. [REVIEW]Alasdair Macintyre - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):187 - 190.
  • Strong Evaluation Without Moral Sources. On Charles Taylor’s Philosophical Anthropology and Ethics.Arto Laitinen - 2008 - De Gruyter.
    Charles Taylor is one of the leading living philosophers. In this book Arto Laitinen studies and develops further Taylor's philosophical views on human agency, personhood, selfhood and identity. He defends Taylor's view that our ethical understandings of values play a central role. The book also develops and defends Taylor's form of value realism as a view on the nature of ethical values, or values in general. The book criticizes Taylor's view that God, Nature or Human Reason are possible constitutive sources (...)
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  • Hegel.Charles Taylor - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    A major and comprehensive study of the philosophy of Hegel, his place in the history of ideas, and his continuing relevance and importance. Professor Taylor relates Hegel to the earlier history of philosophy and, more particularly, to the central intellectual and spiritual issues of his own time. He sees these in terms of a pervasive tension between the evolving ideals of individuality and self-realization on the one hand, and on the other a deeply-felt need to find significance in a wider (...)
     
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  • Hegel and Modern Society.Charles Taylor - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction to Hegel's thought for the student and general reader, emphasizing in particular his social and political thought and his continuing relevance to contemporary problems.
     
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  • Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity.Charles Taylor - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. 'This is an essentially modern predicament.' Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis, analysing the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Descartes, Montaigne, Luther, and many others. This then serves as a starting point for a renewed understanding of modernity. Taylor argues that modern (...)
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  • Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity.Charles Taylor - 1989 - Harvard University Press.
    Discusses contemporary notions of the self, and examines their origins, development, and effects.
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  • The Importance of What We Care About: Philosophical Essays.Harry G. Frankfurt - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1988 volume is a collection of thirteen seminal essays on ethics, free will, and the philosophy of mind. The essays deal with such central topics as freedom of the will, moral responsibility, the concept of a person, the structure of the will, the nature of action, the constitution of the self, and the theory of personal ideals. By focusing on the distinctive nature of human freedom, Professor Frankfurt is able to explore fundamental problems of what it is to be (...)
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  • The Ethics of Authenticity.Charles Taylor - 1992 - Harvard University Press.
    While some lament the slide of Western culture into relativism and nihilism and others celebrate the trend as a liberating sort of progress, Charles Taylor calls on us to face the moral and political crises of our time, and to make the most ...
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  • Oneself as Another.Paul RICOEUR - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    Paul Ricoeur has been hailed as one of the most important thinkers of the century. Oneself as Another, the clearest account of his "philosophical ethics," substantiates this position and lays the groundwork for a metaphysics of morals.
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  • The Explanation Of Behaviour.C. Taylor - 1964 - Humanities Press.
  • Philosophy and the Human Sciences.Charles Taylor - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy of language) which (...)
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  • Philosophical Arguments.Charles Taylor - 1995 - Harvard University Press.
    In this book Taylor brings together some of his best essays, including "Overcoming Epistemology," "The Validity of Transcendental Argument," "Irreducibly Social ...
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  • Hegel and Modern Society.Charles Taylor - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction to Hegel's thought for the student and general reader, emphasizing in particular his social and political thought and his continuing relevance to contemporary problems.
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  • Human Agency and Language.Charles Taylor - 1985 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy of language) which (...)
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  • Disrespect: The Normative Foundations of Critical Theory.Axel Honneth - 2007 - Polity.
    Over the last decade, Axel Honneth has established himself as one of the leading social and political philosophers in the world today. Rooted in the tradition of critical theory, his writings have been central to the revitalization of critical theory and have become increasingly influential. His theory of recognition has gained worldwide attention and is seen by some as the principal counterpart to Habermass theory of discourse ethics. In this important new volume, Honneth pursues his path-breaking work on recognition by (...)
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  • Redistribution or Recognition? A Political-Philosophical Exchange.Nancy Fraser (ed.) - 2003 - Verso.
    This volume stages a debate between two philosophers, one North American, the other German, who hold different views of the relation of redistribution to ...
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  • The Fragmented World of the Social: Essays in Social and Political Philosophy.Axel Honneth - 1995 - State University of New York Press.
  • The Structure of Desire and Recognition: Self-Consciousness and Self-Constitution.Robert Brandom - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):127-150.
    It is argued that at the center of Hegel’s phenomenology of consciousness is the notion that experience is shaped by identification and sacrifice. Experience is the process of self - constitution and self -transformation of a self -conscious being that risks its own being. The transition from desire to recognition is explicated as a transition from the tripartite structure of want and fulfillment of biological desire to a socially structured recognition that is achieved only in reciprocal recognition, or reflexive recognition. (...)
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  • The Struggle for Recognition: The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts.Axel Honneth - 1995 - Polity.
    In this pathbreaking study, Axel Honneth argues that "the struggle for recognition" is, and should be, at the center of social conflicts.
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  • Fraser on Redistribution, Recognition, and Identity.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):255-265.
    This paper provides a critique of Nancy Fraser's theory of recognition and account of identity and redistribution.
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  • Fraser on Redistribution, Recognition, and Identity.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):255-265.
    This article analyzes Nancy Fraser's account of the contrasting social movements for recognition versus those for redistribution. In her most recent analysis, only those forms of recognition struggles that she equates with identity politics are subject to critique. I argue that identity politics does not have an inevitable logic to it that destines it to fracture, border patrol, internal conservatism, etc., and further that the very redistribution claims she proposes require identity politics.
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  • Beyond Distributive Justice and Struggles for Recognition.James Bohman - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):267-276.
    This article argues that a theory of recognition cannot provide the comprehensive basis for a critical theory or a conception of social justice. In this respect, I agree with Fraser's impulse to include more in such a theory, such as distributive justice and participatory parity. Fraser does not go far enough, to the extent that methodologically she seeks a theory of the same sort as Honneth's. Both Honneth's and Fraser's comprehensive theories cannot account for a central phenomenon of contemporary societies: (...)
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  • Identity, Exclusion, and Critique.Nancy Fraser - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):305-338.
    In this article I reply to four critics. Responding to Linda Alcoff, I contend that my original two-dimensional framework discloses the entwinement of economic and cultural strands of subordination, while also illuminating the dangers of identity politics. Responding to James Bohman, I maintain that, with the addition of the third dimension of representation, my approach illuminates the structural exclusion of the global poor, the relation between justice and democracy, and the status of comprehensive theorizing. Responding to Nikolas Kompridis, I defend (...)
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  • Struggling Over the Meaning of Recognition.Nikolas Kompridis - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):277-289.
    Struggles for recognition are at the same time struggles over what it means to recognize and be recognized. Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth propose two mutually exclusive ways to understand recognition: either as a matter of justice or as a matter of identity. This article argues against the limitations of both of these construals of recognition, and offers a third way of construing it: as a matter of freedom. Recognition is not reducible, empirically or normatively, to any of these, however. (...)
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  • What's Wrong with Hypergoods.Charles Blattberg - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (7):802-832.
    Charles Taylor defines `hypergoods' as the fundamental, architechtonic goods that serve as the basis of our moral frameworks. He also believes that, in principle, we can use reason to reconcile the conflicts that hypergoods engender. This belief, however, relies upon a misindentification of hypergoods as goods rather than as works of art, an error which is itself a result of an overly adversarial conception of practical reason. For Taylor fails to distinguish enough between ethical conflicts and those relating to the (...)
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  • Recognition as Ideology.Axel Honneth - 2007 - In Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 323--347.
     
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  • Taylor and Feminism: From Recognition of Identity to a Politics of the Good.M. A. Orlie - 2004 - In Ruth Abbey (ed.), Charles Taylor. Cambridge University Press. pp. 140--165.
     
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  • The Importance of What We Care About.Harry Frankfurt - 1982 - Synthese 53 (2):257-272.
  • Charles Taylor: Thinking and Living Deep Diversity.Mark Redhead - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Over the past four decades, Charles Taylor's work as an intellectual historian, epistemologist, and normative political theorist has made him a leading figure in contemporary social philosophy. In Charles Taylor: Thinking and Living Deep Diversity, Mark Redhead examines the problem of political fragmentation, the problem of how to accommodate narrowly defined groups while promoting allegiance to a larger polity, through an analysis of Taylor's thought and politics.
     
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  • The Personal Lives of Strong Evaluators: Identity, Pluralism, and Ontology in Charles Taylor's Value Theory.Joel Anderson - 1996 - Constellations 3 (1):17-38.
  • Multiculturalism and "The Politics of Recognition.".Charles Taylor & Amy Gutmann - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):384-386.
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  • Recognition or Redistribution?Axel Honneth - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):43-55.
  • Recognition Without Ethics?Nancy Fraser - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):21-42.
    In the course of the last 30 years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively ‘post-Marxist’ culture-and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving less to enrich struggles for redistribution than to displace (...)
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  • First Things First Redistribution, Recognition and Justification.Rainer Forst - 2007 - European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):291-304.
    This article analyses the debate between Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth in a dialectical fashion. Their controversy about how to construct a critical theory of justice is not just one about the proper balance between `redistribution' and `recognition', it also involves basic questions of social ontology. Differing both from Fraser's `twodimensional' view of `participatory parity' and from Honneth's `monistic' theory of recognition, the article argues for a third view of `justificatory monism and diagnosticevaluative pluralism', also called the `first-things-first' approach. According (...)
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  • 23 The Politics of Recognition.Charles Taylor - 1994 - Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader.
  • Sorting Out Aspects of Personhood.Arto Laitinen - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (5-6):248-270.
    This paper examines how three central aspects of personhood — the capacities of individuals, their normative status, and the social aspect of being recognized — are related, and how personhood depends on them. The paper defends first of all a ‘basic view’that while actual recognition is among the constitutive elements of full personhood, it is the individual capacities (and not full personhood) which ground the basic moral and normative demands concerning treatment of persons. Actual recognition depends analyti- cally on such (...)
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  • Atomism.Charles Taylor - 1979 - In Alkis Kontos (ed.), Powers, Possessions and Freedom: Essays in Honour of C.B. Macpherson. University of Toronto Press.
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  • Hegel and Modern Society.Charles Taylor - 1979 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 41 (4):708-709.
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  • Anthropology, Social Theory, and Politics: Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition.Carl-Göran Heidegren - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):433 – 446.
    This article presents and discusses Axel Honneth's theory of recognition as a specific constellation, i.e. as a theoretical endeavour spanning over and interrelating positions in the fields of anthropology, social theory, and politics. As essential components in this constellation I discern an anthropology of recognition, a social philosophy of different forms of recognition, a morality of recognition, a theory of democratic ethical life as a social ideal, and a notion of political democracy as an ambitious reflexive form of social cooperation. (...)
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  • Authenticity and the Politics of Identity: A Critique of Charles Taylor's Politics of Recognition.Brenda Lyshaug - 2004 - Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):300-320.
    This essay evaluates Charles Taylor's defence of a politics of recognition in light of his broader account of modern identity and the self. I argue that his call for a politics of recognition betrays what is most ethically promising in his own account of modern subjectivity – namely, its emphasis on and affirmation of inner multiplicity. The first part of the paper identifies the ways in which his account of the self affirms inner multiplicity. The second part of the paper (...)
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  • Integrity and Disrespect.Axel Honneth - 1992 - Political Theory 20 (2):187-201.
  • Interpersonal Recognition and Responsiveness to Relevant Differences.Arto Laitinen - 2006 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (1):47-70.
    This essay defends a three-dimensional response-model theory of recognition of persons, and discusses the related phenomenon of recognition of reasons, values and principles. The theory is three-dimensional in endorsing recognition of the equality of persons and two kinds of relevant differences: merits and special relationships. It defends a ‘response-model’ which holds that adequacy of recognition of persons is a matter of adequate responsiveness to situation-specific reasons and requirements. This three-dimen- sional response-model is compared to Peter Jones’s view, which draws the (...)
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  • Grounding Recognition: A Rejoinder to Critical Questions.Axel Honneth - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):499 – 519.
    It is always great good fortune for an author to have his writings meet with a receptive circle of readers who take them up in their own work and clarify them further. Indeed, it may even be the secret of all theoretical productivity that one reaches an opportune point in one's own creative process when others' queries, suggestions, and criticisms give one no peace, until one has been forced to come up with new answers and solutions. The four essays collected (...)
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  • Cultural Relativism and Social Criticism From a Taylorian Perspective.Hartmut Rosa - 1996 - Constellations 3 (1):39-60.
  • Identity or Status? Struggles Over ‘Recognition’ in Fraser, Honneth, and Taylor.Christopher F. Zurn - 2003 - Constellations 10 (4):519-537.