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  1. From Chain Liability to Chain Responsibility.Rob Van Tulder, Jeroen Van Wijk & Ans Kolk - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):399 - 412.
    This article examines whether the involvement of stakeholders in the design of corporate codes of conduct leads to a higher implementation likelihood of the code. The empirical focus is on Occupational Safety and Health (OSH). The article compares the inclusion of OSH issues in the codes of conduct of 30 companies involved in International Framework Agreements (IFAs), agreed upon by trade unions and multinational enterprises, with those of a benchmark sample of 38 leading Multinational Enterprises in comparable industries. It is (...)
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  • Clusters, Chains and Compliance: Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance in Football Manufacturing in South Asia.Peter Lund- Thomsen & Khalid Nadvi - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (S2):201 - 222.
    A recent concern in the debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries relates to the tension between demands for CSR compliance found in many global value chains (GVCs) and the search for locally appropriate responses to these pressures. In this context, an emerging and relatively understudied area of interest relates to small firm industrial clusters. Local clusters offer the potential for local joint action, and thus a basis for improving local compliance on CSR through collective monitoring and local (...)
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  • Realism or Idealism? Corporate Social Responsibility and the Employee Stakeholder in the Global Fast‐Food Industry.Tony Royle - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (1):42-55.
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  • Suppliers' Compliance with Mncs' Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers. [REVIEW]Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45 - 62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers’ level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers’ codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards in the toy (...)
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  • Comments on BEQ’s Twentieth Anniversary Forum on New Directions for Business Ethics Research.Andrew Crane, Dirk Ulrich Gilbert, Kenneth E. Goodpaster, Marcia P. Miceli & Geoff Moore - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):157-187.
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  • Accountability in a Global Economy: The Emergence of International Accountability Standards.Sandra Waddock - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):23-44.
    This article assesses the proliferation of international accountability standards (IAS) in the recent past. We provide a comprehensive overview about the different types of standards and discuss their role as part of a new institutional infrastructure for corporate responsibility. Based on this, it is argued that IAS can advance corporate responsibility on a global level because they contribute to the closure of some omnipresent governance gaps. IAS also improve the preparedness of an organization to give an explanation and a justification (...)
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  • Impacts of Corporate Code of Conduct on Labor Standards: A Case Study of Reebok’s Athletic Footwear Supplier Factory in China. [REVIEW]Xiaomin Yu - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):513 - 529.
    This study examines the social impacts of labor-related corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies or corporate codes of conduct on upholding labor standards through a case study of CSR discourses and codes implementation of Reebok – a leading branded company enjoying a high-profiled image for its human rights achievement – in a large Taiwanese-invested athletic footwear factory located in South China. I find although implementation of Reebok labor-related codes has resulted in a “race to ethical and legal minimum” labor standards when (...)
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  • Realism or Idealism? Corporate Social Responsibility and the Employee Stakeholder in the Global Fast-Food Industry.Tony Royle - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (1):42-55.
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  • Managing Global Supply Chain: The Sports Footwear, Apparel and Retail Sectors.Ivanka Mamic - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):81-100.
    Amongst a backdrop of debate regarding Codes of Conduct and their raison d’etre this paper provides a detailed summary of the management systems used by multinational enterprises in the Code implementation process. It puts forth a framework for analysis based on the elements of – the creation of a vision, the development of understanding and ability, integration into operations and feedback, improvement and remediation – and then applies it across the sports footwear, apparel and retail sectors in order to firstly, (...)
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  • How Global is the Global Compact?Jennifer Ann Bremer - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (3):227–244.
    Launched by the United Nations in 2000, the Global Compact (GC) promotes private sector compliance with 10 basic principles covering human rights, labour standards, the environment, and anti-corruption. Its sponsors aim to establish a global corporate social responsibility (CSR) network based on a pledge to observe the 10 principles adopted by companies across the range of company size and regional origin, backed by a modest reporting system and collaborative programmes. The author analyzes the GC's progress toward building a global network (...)
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  • Mapping Research Topics and Theories in Private Regulation for Sustainability in Global Value Chains.Antje Wahl & Gary Q. Bull - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (4):585-608.
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  • The Transparent Supply Chain: From Resistance to Implementation at Nike and Levi-Strauss. [REVIEW]David J. Doorey - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):587-603.
    Information disclosure is a common regulatory tool designed to influence business behavior. A belief is that transparency can provoke learning and also positive institutional change by empowering private watchdogs to monitor and pressure business leaders to alter harmful behavior. Beginning in the late 1990s, a private movement emerged that pressured corporations to disclose the identify of their global supplier factories. These activists believed that factory disclosure would lead to greater accountability by corporations for the working conditions under which their products (...)
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  • Mattel, Inc.: Global Manufacturing Principles (GMP) - A Life-Cycle Analysis of a Company-Based Code of Conduct in the Toy Industry. [REVIEW]S. Prakash Sethi, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):483 - 517.
    Over the last 20+ years, multinational corporations (MNCs) have been confronted with accusations of abuse of market power and unfair and unethical business conduct especially as it relates to their overseas operations and supply chain management. These accusations include, among others, worker exploitation in terms of unfairly low wages, excessive work hours, and unsafe work environment; pollution and contamination of air, ground water and land resources; and, undermining the ability of natural government to protect the well-being of their citizens. MNCs (...)
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  • Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.
  • Creating Corporate Accountability: Foundational Principles to Make Corporate Citizenship Real. [REVIEW]Sandra Waddock - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):313-327.
    This paper explores the growing array of initiatives aimed at creating corporate accountability with the goal of attempting to uncover the foundation principles that underlie them and create a floor below which practices are ethically questionable. Using the Global Compact's nine principles and the work of Transparency International as guides, foundational principles seem to exist in the areas of human rights, labor standards, environment, and anti-corruption initiatives.
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  • Responsible Retailing: The Practice of CSR in Banana Plantations in Costa Rica. [REVIEW]Pamela K. Robinson - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S2):279 - 289.
    During the last 10 years or so, a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives have been introduced in global supply chains, which aim to improve the conditions of workers engaged in producing goods for export. This article discusses the observations of CSR in practice in the Costa Rican-United Kingdom (UK) banana chain. The banana chain makes for an interesting case study because there are dominant corporate actors at each end who are in a position to influence the conditions experienced (...)
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  • Corporate Responsibility in Scandinavian Supply Chains.Robert Strand - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):179 - 185.
    This article examines corporate responsibility in the supply chains of four of the largest Scandinavian multinational corporations - IKEA, Nokia, Novo Nordisk, and StatoilHydro - and offers two key findings. First, these Scandinavian companies have all implemented responsible supply chain practices where suppliers in developing nations, and the communities of these suppliers, are engaged as key stakeholders and treated as partners. Second, these supply chain practices all share the common bond of having honesty and the establishment of trust-based relationships at (...)
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  • Suppliers’ Compliance with MNCs’ Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers.Niklas Egels-Zandén - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45-62.
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations. This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers' level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers' codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards in the toy retailers' (...)
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  • Impacts of Corporate Code of Conduct on Labor Standards: A Case Study of Reebok’s Athletic Footwear Supplier Factory in China.Xiaomin Yu - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):513-529.
    This study examines the social impacts of labor-related corporate social responsibility policies or corporate codes of conduct on upholding labor standards through a case study of CSR discourses and codes implementation of Reebok - a leading branded company enjoying a high-profiled image for its human rights achievement - in a large Taiwanese-invested athletic footwear factory located in South China. I find although implementation of Reebok labor-related codes has resulted in a "race to ethical and legal minimum" labor standards when notoriously (...)
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  • Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (3):206-222.
  • Mattel, Inc.: Global Manufacturing Principles – A Life-Cycle Analysis of a Company-Based Code of Conduct in the Toy Industry.S. Prakash Sethi, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):483-517.
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