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  1. A Developmental Model for the Evolution of Language and Intelligence in Early Hominids.Sue Taylor Parker & Kathleen Rita Gibson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):367-381.
  • How the Child Got His Stages.S. T. Parker & K. R. Gibson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):399-407.
  • What Explains Differences in Men’s and Women’s Production?Rebecca Bliege Bird, Brian F. Codding & Douglas W. Bird - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (2):105-129.
    Researchers commonly use long-term average production inequalities to characterize cross-cultural patterns in foraging divisions of labor, but little is known about how the strategies of individuals shape such inequalities. Here, we explore the factors that lead to daily variation in how much men produce relative to women among Martu, contemporary foragers of the Western Desert of Australia. We analyze variation in foraging decisions on temporary foraging camps and find that the percentage of total camp production provided by each gender varies (...)
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  • Nonmarket Cooperation in the Indigenous Food Economy of Taimyr, Arctic Russia: Evidence for Control and Benefit.John Ziker - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):571-571.
    Empirical data on food sharing in native Dolgan, Nganasan, and Nenets communities in Siberia provide evidence for hunter control over big game and fish, as well as likely benefits of inter-household sharing. Most food sharing occurs with kin and, thus, kin-selection-based nepotism cannot be ruled out. Reciprocal interhousehold sharing at meals occurs less often. Social context is discussed.
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  • To Give and to Give Not: The Behavioral Ecology of Human Food Transfers.Michael Gurven - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):543-559.
    The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal altruism, tolerated scrounging, and costly signaling. Debates about the relevance of these models focus primarily on the extent (...)
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  • Meal Sharing Among the Ye’Kwana.Raymond Hames & Carl McCabe - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (1):1-21.
    In this study meal sharing is used as a way of quantifying food transfers between households. Traditional food-sharing studies measure the flow of resources between households. Meal sharing, in contrast, measures food consumption acts according to whether one is a host or a guest in the household as well as the movement of people between households in the context of food consumption. Our goal is to test a number of evolutionary models of food transfers, but first we argue that before (...)
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  • Food Sharing at Meals.John Ziker & Michael Schnegg - 2005 - Human Nature 16 (2):178-210.
  • Reservation Food Sharing Among the Ache of Paraguay.Michael Gurven, Wesley Allen-Arave, Kim Hill & A. Magdalena Hurtado - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (4):273-297.
    We describe food transfer patterns among Ache Indians living on a permanent reservation. The social atmosphere at the reservation is characterized by a larger group size, a more predictable diet, and more privacy than the Ache typically experience in the forest while on temporary foraging treks. Although sharing patterns vary by resource type and package size, much of the food available at the reservation is given to members of just a few other families. We find significant positive correlations between amounts (...)
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  • A Bioeconomic Approach to Marriage and the Sexual Division of Labor.Michael Gurven, Jeffrey Winking, Hillard Kaplan, Christopher von Rueden & Lisa McAllister - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (2):151-183.
    Children may be viewed as public goods whereby both parents receive equal genetic benefits yet one parent often invests more heavily than the other. We introduce a microeconomic framework for understanding household investment decisions to address questions concerning conflicts of interest over types and amount of work effort among married men and women. Although gains and costs of marriage may not be spread equally among marriage partners, marriage is still a favorable, efficient outcome under a wide range of conditions. This (...)
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  • Tolerated Theft, Suggestions About the Ecology and Evolution of Sharing, Hoarding and Scrounging.N. G. Blurton Jones - 1987 - Social Science Information 26 (1):31-54.
  • A Statnet Tutorial.S. M. Goodreau, M. S. Handcock, D. R. Hunter, C. T. Butts & M. Morris - unknown
    The statnet suite of R packages contains a wide range of functionality for the statistical analysis of social networks, including the implementation of exponential-family random graph models. In this paper we illustrate some of the functionality of statnet through a tutorial analysis of a friendship network of 1,461 adolescents.
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  • Ergm: A Package to Fit, Simulate and Diagnose Exponential-Family Models for Networks.M. Morris, S. M. Goodreau, C. T. Butts, M. S. Handcock & D. R. Hunter - unknown
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  • The Major Transitions in Evolution.John Maynard Smith & Eors Szathmary - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):151-152.
  • The Evolution of Reciprocal Altruism.Robert Trivers - 1971 - Quarterly Review of Biology 46 (1):35-57.
    A model is presented to account for the natural selection of what is termed reciprocally altruistic behavior. The model shows how selection can operate -against the cheater (non-reciprocator) in the system. Three instances of altruistic behavior are discussed, the evolution of which the model can explain: (1) behavior involved in cleaning symbioses; (2) warning cries in birds: and (3) human reciprocal altruism. Regarding human reciprocal altruism, it is shown that the details of the psychological system that regulates this altruism can (...)
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