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  1. Biosemiotic Questions.Kalevi Kull, Claus Emmeche & Donald Favareau - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):41-55.
    This paper examines the biosemiotic approach to the study of life processes by fashioning a series of questions that any worthwhile semiotic study of life should ask. These questions can be understood simultaneously as: (1) questions that distinguish a semiotic biology from a non-semiotic (i.e., reductionist–physicalist) one; (2) questions that any student in biosemiotics should ask when doing a case study; and (3) still currently unanswered questions of biosemiotics. In addition, some examples of previously undertaken biosemiotic case studies are examined (...)
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  • The Hypothesis of a Genetic Protolanguage: An Epistemological Investigation. [REVIEW]Gregory Katz - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (1):57-73.
    Progress in molecular biology has revealed profound relations between linguistic and genomic sciences, mainly through advances in bioinformatics. The structural symmetries between biochemical and verbal syntaxes raise the question of their origins: did they emerge independently, or did one arise from the other? Does the genetic code contain the traces of a protolanguage, a universal grammar whose gradual evolution and successive mutations progressively led to the polymorphism of natural languages? To explore this question, we review the isomorphism of the genetic (...)
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  • Knowledge Representation and Metaphor.E. Cornell Way - 1991 - Springer Verlag.
    This series will include monographs and collections of studies devoted to the investigation and exploration of knowledge, information, and data processing systems of all kinds, no matter whether human, animal, or machine. Its scope is intended to span the full range of interests from classical problems in the philosophy of mind and philosophical psychol ogy through issues in cognitive psychology and sociobiology to ideas related to artificial intelligence and computer science. While primary emphasis will be placed upon theoretical, conceptual, and (...)
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  • The Physics of Autonomous Biological Information.Howard H. Pattee - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (3):224-226.
    The general concept of information does not belong in the category of universal and inexorable physical laws but in the category of initial conditions and boundary conditions. Boundary conditions formed by local structures are often called constraints. Informational structures such as symbol vehicles are a special type of constraint. It should be clear that the concepts of initial conditions and constraints in physics make no sense outside the context of the law-based physical dynamics to which they apply. This is also (...)
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  • Meaning.Michael Polanyi - 1975 - University of Chicago Press.
    Published very shortly before his death in February 1976, Meaning is the culmination of Michael Polanyi's philosophic endeavors.
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  • Imagery in Scientific Thought: Creating 20th-Century Physics.Arthur I. Miller - 1984 - MIT Press.
    Arthur I. Miller is a historian of science whose approach has been strongly influenced by current work in cognitive science, and in this book he shows how the two fields might be fruitfully linked to yield new insights into the creative process.
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  • Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff & Mark Johnson - 1980 - University of Chicago Press.
    The now-classic Metaphors We Live By changed our understanding of metaphor and its role in language and the mind. Metaphor, the authors explain, is a fundamental mechanism of mind, one that allows us to use what we know about our physical and social experience to provide understanding of countless other subjects. Because such metaphors structure our most basic understandings of our experience, they are "metaphors we live by"--metaphors that can shape our perceptions and actions without our ever noticing them. In (...)
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  • Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution.Theodosius Dobzhansky - 1973 - American Biology Teacher 35:125-129.
  • The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field.Harry Merrill Gehman - 1949 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (2):288-289.
  • Code-Duality and the Semiotics of Nature.Claus Emmeche - manuscript
    The final version of the paper is published pp. 117-166 in: Myrdene Anderson and Floyd Merrell (eds.): On Semiotic Modeling . Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin and New York, 1991.
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  • Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution.Theodosius Dobzhansky - 1983 - In J. Peter Zetterberg (ed.), Evolution Versus Creationism: The Public Education Controversy. Oryx Press. pp. 18--28.
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  • Physical and Functional Conditions for Symbols, Codes, and Languages.H. H. Pattee - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (2):147-168.
    All sciences have epistemic assumptions, a language for expressing their theories or models, and symbols that reference observables that can be measured. In most sciences the language in which their models are expressed are not the focus of their attention, although the choice of language is often crucial for the model. On the contrary, biosemiotics, by definition, cannot escape focusing on the symbol–matter relationship. Symbol systems first controlled material construction at the origin of life. At this molecular level it is (...)
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  • The Faculty of Language: What is It, Who has It, and How Did It Evolve?Hauser Marc, D. Chomsky, Noam Fitch & W. Tecumseh - 2002 - Science 298 (22):1569-1579.
    We argue that an understanding of the faculty of language requires substantial interdisciplinary cooperation. We suggest how current developments in linguistics can be profitably wedded to work in evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience. We submit that a distinction should be made between the faculty of language in the broad sense (FLB)and in the narrow sense (FLN). FLB includes a sensory-motor system, a conceptual-intentional system, and the computational mechanisms for recursion, providing the capacity to generate an infinite range of expressions (...)
     
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  • More is Different.P. W. Anderson - 1994 - In H. Gutfreund & G. Toulouse (eds.), Biology and Computation: A Physicist's Choice. World Scientific. pp. 3--21.
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