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  1. Berkeley’s Thought. [REVIEW]Lex Newman - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):314-318.
    By his own account, Pappas "focuses on three core elements" of Berkeley's thought: abstraction, immediate perception, and common sense. The reader will also find interesting commentary on numerous other aspects of Berkeley's thought, including detailed treatments of the esse is percipi principle and Berkeley's claimed avoidance of skepticism.
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  • Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas.Thomas M. Lennon - 1989 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):644-647.
  • Judgment and Proposition: From Descartes to Kant.Gabriel Nuchelmans - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (3):481-483.
  • Berkeley's Theory of Abstract Ideas.C. C. W. Taylor - 1978 - Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):97-115.
    While claiming to refute locke's theory of abstract ideas, Berkeley himself accepts a form of abstractionism. Locke's account of abstraction is indeterminate between two doctrines: 1) abstract ideas are representations of paradigm instances of kinds, 2) abstract ideas are schematic representations of the defining features of kinds. Berkeley's arguments are directed exclusively against 2, And refute only a specific version of it, Which there is no reason to ascribe to locke; berkeley himself accepts abstract ideas of the former type. Locke's (...)
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  • Idea and Ontology: An Essay in Early Modern Metaphysics of Ideas.Marc A. Hight - 2013 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The prevailing view about the history of early modern philosophy, which the author dubs “the early modern tale” and wants to convince us is really a fairy tale, has it that the focus on ideas as a solution to various epistemological puzzles, first introduced by Descartes, created difficulties for the traditional ontological scheme of substance and mode. The early modern tale depicts the development of “the way of ideas” as abandoning ontology at least by the time of Berkeley. This, in (...)
     
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  • Locke on the Semantic and Epistemic Role of Simple Ideas of Sensation.Martha Brandt Bolton - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):301–321.
  • John Locke.Richard I. Aaron - 1937 - Clarendon Press.
  • John Locke and Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Anstey presents a thorough and innovative study of John Locke's views on the method and content of natural philosophy. Focusing on Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding, but also drawing extensively from his other writings and manuscript remains, Anstey argues that Locke was an advocate of the Experimental Philosophy: the new approach to natural philosophy championed by Robert Boyle and the early Royal Society who were opposed to speculative philosophy. On the question of method, Anstey shows how Locke's pessimism about (...)
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  • Malebranche and Arnauld on Ideas.Richard A. Watson - 1994 - Modern Schoolman 71 (4):259-270.
  • Ideas and Explanation in Early Modern Philosophy.Kenneth L. Pearce - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    Malebranche argues that ideas are representative beings existing in God. He defends this thesis by an inference to the best explanation of human perception. It is well-known that Malebranche's theory of vision in God was forcefully rejected by philosophers such as Arnauld, Locke, and Berkeley. However, the notion that ideas exist in God was not the only controversial aspect of Malebranche's approach. Another controversy centered around Malebranche's view that ideas are to be understood as posits in an explanatory theory. Opponents (...)
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  • Direct Realism, Intentionality, and the Objective Being of Ideas.Paul Hoffman - 2002 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):163-179.
    My aim is to arrive at a better understanding of the distinction between direct realism and representationalism by offering a critical analysis of Steven Nadler.
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  • Arnauld's Verbal Distinction Between Ideas and Perceptions.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2016 - History and Philosophy of Logic 37 (4):375-390.
    In his dispute with Malebranche about the nature of ideas, Arnauld endorses a form of direct realism. This appears to conflict with views put forward by Arnauld and his collaborators in the Port-Royal Grammar and Logic where ideas are treated as objects in the mind. This tension can be resolved by a careful examination of Arnauld's remarks on the semantics of ‘perception’ and ‘idea’ in light of the Port-Royal theory of language. This examination leads to the conclusion that Arnauld's ideas (...)
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  • Locke: Epistemology and Ontology.Michael Ayers - 1991 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
     
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  • Locke on Attention.Matthew Stuart - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):487-505.
    Locke’s remarks about attention have not received a great deal of attention from commentators. In Section 1, I make the case that attention plays an important role in his philosophy. In Section 2, I describe and discuss five Lockean claims about attention. In Section 3, I explore Locke’s views about attention in relation to his account of sense perception. He thinks that we attend to objects by attending to ideas, and I argue that he treats sensory ideas as transparent in (...)
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  • The Relation Between Anti-Abstractionism and Idealism in Berkeley's Metaphysics.Samuel C. Rickless - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):723-740.
    George Berkeley maintains both anti-abstractionism (that abstract ideas are impossible) and idealism (that physical objects and their qualities are mind-dependent). Some scholars (including Atherton, Bolton, and Pappas) have argued, in different ways, that Berkeley uses anti-abstractionism as a premise in a simple argument for idealism. In this paper, I argue that the relation between anti-abstractionism and idealism in Berkeley's metaphysics is more complex than these scholars acknowledge. Berkeley distinguishes between two kinds of abstraction, singling abstraction and generalizing abstraction. He then (...)
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  • Locke and Arnauld on Judgment and Proposition.Maria van der Schaar - 2008 - History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (4):327-341.
    To understand pre-Fregean theories of judgment and proposition, such as those found in Locke and the Port-Royal logic, it is important to distinguish between propositions in the modern sense and propositions in the pre-Fregean sense. By making this distinction it becomes clear that these pre-Fregean theories cannot be meant to solve the propositional attitude problem. Notwithstanding this fact, Locke and Arnauld are able to make a distinction between asserted and unasserted propositions (in their sense). The way Locke makes this distinction (...)
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  • Locke's Implicit Ontology of Ideas.Marc A. Hight - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):17-42.
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  • Lockean Operations.Matthew Stuart - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (3):511 – 533.
  • A New Look at the Speckled Hen.M. Tye - 2009 - Analysis 69 (2):258-263.
    We owe the problem of the speckled hen to Gilbert Ryle. It was suggested to A.J. Ayer by Ryle in connection with Ayer’s account of seeing. Suppose that you are standing before a speckled hen with your eyes trained on it. You are in good light and nothing is obstructing your view. You see the hen in a single glance. The hen has 47 speckles on its facing side, let us say, and the hen ap­ pears speckled to you. On (...)
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  • Berkeley’s Thought. [REVIEW]Howard Robinson - 2004 - Mind 113 (451):571-575.
  • Language and the Structure of Berkeley's World.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's philosophy is meant to be a defense of commonsense. However, Berkeley's claim that the ultimate constituents of physical reality are fleeting, causally passive ideas appears to be radically at odds with commonsense. In particular, such a theory seems unable to account for the robust structure which commonsense (and Newtonian physics) takes the world to exhibit. The problem of structure, as I understand it, includes the problem of how qualities can be grouped by their co-occurrence in a single enduring object (...)
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  • John Locke.W. von Leyden - 1956 - Philosophical Quarterly 6 (23):182.
  • Propositional Attitudes in Modern Philosophy.Walter Ott - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (3):551-568.
    Philosophers of the modern period are often presented as having made an elementary error: that of confounding the atttitude one adopts toward a proposition with its content. By examining the works of Locke and the Port-Royalians, I show that this accusation is ill-founded and that Locke, in particular, has the resources to construct a theory of propositional attitudes.
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  • Berkeley's Thought.George S. Pappas - 2019 - Cornell University Press.
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  • Berkeley and the Ineffable.Thomas M. Lennon - 1988 - Synthese 75 (2):231 - 250.
  • Locke on Sensitive Knowledge and the Veil of Perception – Four Misconceptions.Lex Newman - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):273–300.
    Interpreters of Locke’s Essay are divided over whether to attribute to him a Representational Theory of Perception (RTP). Those who object to an RTP interpretation cite (among other things) Locke’s Book IV account of sensitive knowledge, contending that the account is incompatible with RTP. The aim of this paper is to rebut this kind of objection – to defend an RTP reading of the relevant Book IV passages. Specifically, I address four influential assumptions (about sensitive knowledge) cited by opponents of (...)
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  • The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715.Lex Newman & Thomas M. Lennon - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):272.
  • Arnauld and the Cartesian philosophy of ideas.Steven M. NADLER - 1989 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 181 (1):110-111.
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  • Berkeley: An Interpretation.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1989 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David Hume wrote that Berkeley's arguments `admit of no answer but produce no conviction'. This book aims at the kind of understanding of Berkeley's philosophy that comes from seeing how we ourselves might be brought to embrace it. Berkeley held that matter does not exist, and that the sensations we take to be caused by an indifferent and independent world are instead caused directly by God. Nature becomes a text, with no existence apart from the spirits who transmit and receive (...)
     
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  • The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715.Thomas M. Lennon - 1993 - Princeton University Press.
    These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions.
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  • Locke on Abstraction: A Response to M. R. Ayers.Jonathan Walmsley - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):123 – 134.
  • Drafts for the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and Other Philosophical Writings.John Locke - 1990 - Clarendon Press.
    This volume is the first of three which will contain all of Locke's extant writings on philosophy which relate to An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, other than those contained in volumes of the Clarendon Edition of John Locke such as the Correspondence. The book contains the two earliest known drafts of the Essay, both written in 1671, and provides for the first time an accurate version of Locke's text together with a record of virtually all his changes, in notes at (...)
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  • Descartes, Malebranche, and the Crisis of Perception.Walter Ott - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The seventeenth century witnesses the demise of two core doctrines in the theory of perception: naive realism about color, sound, and other sensible qualities and the empirical theory, drawn from Alhacen and Roger Bacon, which underwrote it. This created a problem for seventeenth century philosophers: how is that we use qualities such as color, feel, and sound to locate objects in the world, even though these qualities are not real? -/- Ejecting such sensible qualities from the mind-independent world at once (...)
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  • Locke on Ideas of Substance and the Veil of Perception.Gideon Yaffe - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):255–272.
  • Locke's Representationalism Without Veil.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):675 – 696.
  • Locke's Implicit Ontology of Ideas.Marc A. Hight - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):17 – 42.
  • Ideas and Knowledge in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.John W. Yolton - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (2):145-165.
  • Ideas, Pictures, and the Directness of Perception in Descartes and Locke.Lex Newman - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):134-154.
    How are we to understand philosophical claims about sense perception being direct versus indirect? There are multiple relevant notions of perceptual directness, so I argue. Perception of external objects may be direct on some notions, while indirect on others. My interest is with the sense in which ideas count as perceptual mediators in the philosophy of Descartes and Locke. This paper has two broader aims. The first is to clarify four main notions of perceptual directness. The second is to support (...)
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  • Propositions and Judgments in Locke and Arnauld: A Monstrous and Unholy Union?Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (2):255-280.
    Philosophers have accused locke of holding a view about propositions that simply conflates the formation of a propositional thought with the judgment that a proposition is true, and charged that this has obviously absurd consequences.1 Worse, this account appears not to be unique to Locke: it bears a striking resemblance to one found in both the Port-Royal Logic (the Logic, for short) and the Port-Royal Grammar. In the Logic, this account forms part of the backbone of the traditional logic expounded (...)
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  • Locke and the Nature of Ideas.Keith Allen - 2010 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (3):236-255.
    What, according to Locke, are ideas? I argue that Locke does not give an account of the nature of ideas. In the Essay, the question is simply set to one side, as recommended by the “Historical, plain Method” that Locke employs. This is exemplified by his characterization of ‘ideas’ in E I.i.8, and the discussion of the inverted spectrum hypothesis in E II.xxxii. In this respect, Locke's attitude towards the nature of ideas in the Essay is reminiscent of Boyle's diffident (...)
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  • The Theory of Ideas in Gassendi and Locke.Fred S. Michael & Emily Michael - 1990 - Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (3):379-399.
  • Perceptual Acquaintance From Descartes to Reid.John W. Yolton - 1985 - Mind 94 (374):300-302.
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  • Berkeley's Theory of Abstract Ideas.C. C. W. Taylor - 1978 - University of St. Andrew's].
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  • Malebranche and British Philosophy.Charles J. Mccracken - 1985 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (1):128-128.
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  • Malebranche and British Philosophy.Charles Mccracken - 1983 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 173 (4):467-468.
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  • The Works of John Locke.John Locke - 1727 - Printed for T. Tegg, W. Sharpe and Son [Etc.].
     
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  • Locke.A. J. Pyle - 2013 - Polity.
    John Locke has a good claim to the title of the greatest ever English philosopher, and was a founding father of both the empiricist tradition in philosophy and the liberal tradition in politics. This new book provides an accessible introduction to Locke’s thought. Although its primary focus is on the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, it also discusses the Two Treatises on Government, the Essay on Toleration, and the Reasonableness of Christianity, and draws on materials from Locke’s correspondence and notebooks to (...)
     
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  • The Works of John Locke.John Locke & James Augustus St John - 1727 - Henry G. Bohn.
     
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  • Locke: His Philosophical Thought.Nicholas Jolley - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is a general introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, one of the most influential thinkers in modern times. Nicholas Jolley aims to show the fundamental unity of Locke's thought in his masterpiece, the Essay Concerning Human Understanding. In this work Locke advances a coherent theory of knowledge; as against Descartes he argues that knowledge is possible to the extent that it concerns essences which are constructions of the human mind.
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  • The Relevance of Locke's Theory of Ideas to His Doctrine of Nominal Essence and Anti-Essentialist Semantic Theory.Martha Brandt Bolton - 1998 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Locke. Oxford University Press.
     
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