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Andrew Peterson (forthcoming). Should Neuroscience Inform Judgements of Decision-Making Capacity?

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  1.  10
    Natural and Social Inequality.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Page Count 26 This paper examines the moral import of a distinction between natural and social inequalities. Following Thomas Nagel, it argues for a “denatured” distinction that relies less on the biological vs. social causation of inequalities than on the idea that society is morally responsible for some inequalities but not others. It maintains that securing fair equality of opportunity by eliminating such social inequalities has particularly high priority in distributive justice. Departing from Nagel, it argues that society (...)
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  2.  6
    Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in Patients with Communication Impairments.Molly Cairncross, Andrew Peterson, Andrea Lazosky, Teneille Gofton & Charles Weijer - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):691-699.
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  3.  21
    On Risk and Decisional Capacity.David Checkland - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):35 – 59.
    Limits to paternalism are, in the liberal democracies, partially defined by the concepts of decision-making capacity/incapacity (mental competence/incompetence). The paper is a response to Ian Wilkss (1997) recent attempt to defend the idea that the standards for decisional capacity ought to vary with the degree of risk incurred by certain choices. Wilkss defense is based on a direct appeal to the logical features of examples and analogies, thus attempting to by-pass earlier criticisms (e.g., Culver Gert, 1990) of risk-based standards. Wilkss (...)
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  4.  54
    The Neuroscience of Decision Making and Our Standards for Assessing Competence to Consent.Steve Clarke - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):189-196.
    Rapid advances in neuroscience may enable us to identify the neural correlates of ordinary decision making. Such knowledge opens up the possibility of acquiring highly accurate information about people’s competence to consent to medical procedures and to participate in medical research. Currently we are unable to determine competence to consent with accuracy and we make a number of unrealistic practical assumptions to deal with our ignorance. Here I argue that if we are able to detect competence to consent and if (...)
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  5.  3
    Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decision Making.Allen E. Buchanan & Dan W. Brock - 1992 - Ethics 103 (1):172-175.
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  6.  3
    A History and Theory of Informed Consent.Ruth R. Faden & Tom L. Beauchamp - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):605-606.
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  7.  2
    Mosaic Decisionmaking and Reemergent Agency After Severe Brain Injury.J. Fins Joseph - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-12.
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  8. Understanding Autonomy in Light of Intellectual Disability.Leslie P. Francis - 2009 - In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press.
     
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  9.  22
    A Moral Theory of Informed Consent.Benjamin Freedman - 1975 - Hastings Center Report 5 (4):32-39.
  10.  6
    Minors' Assent, Consent, or Dissent to Medical Research.Sanford Leikin - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  11.  15
    Fiduciary Obligation in Clinical Research.Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):424-440.
    Heated debate surrounds the question whether the relationship between physician-researcher and patient-subject is governed by a duty of care. Miller and Weijer argue that fiduciary law provides a strong legal foundation for this duty, and for articulating the terms of the relationship between physician-researcher and patient-subject.
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  12. Fiduciary Obligation in Clinical Research.Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):424-440.
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  13.  76
    Mental Capacity and Decisional Autonomy: An Interdisciplinary Challenge.Gareth S. Owen, Fabian Freyenhagen, Genevra Richardson & Matthew Hotopf - 2009 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):79 – 107.
    With the waves of reform occurring in mental health legislation in England and other jurisdictions, mental capacity is set to become a key medico-legal concept. The concept is central to the law of informed consent and is closely aligned to the philosophical concept of autonomy. It is also closely related to mental disorder. This paper explores the interdisciplinary terrain where mental capacity is located. Our aim is to identify core dilemmas and to suggest pathways for future interdisciplinary research. The terrain (...)
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  14.  2
    Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in the Behaviorally Nonresponsive Patient With Residual Covert Awareness.Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Charles Weijer, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Mackenzie Graham & Adrian M. Owen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (4):3-14.
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  15.  2
    A Principled Argument, But Not a Practical One.Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Charles Weijer & Adrian M. Owen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):52-53.
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  16.  46
    Thinking About the Good: Reconfiguring Liberal Metaphysics (or Not) for People with Cognitive Disabilities.Anita Silvers & Leslie Pickering Francis - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):475-498.
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    Competence to Make Treatment Decisions in Anorexia Nervosa: Thinking Processes and Values.Jacinta Tan, Anne Stewart, Ray Fitzpatrick & R. A. Hope - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):267-282.
  18. Natural and Social Inequality.David Wasserman & Sean Aas - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (5):576-601.
    _ Source: _Page Count 26 This paper examines the moral import of a distinction between natural and social inequalities. Following Thomas Nagel, it argues for a “denatured” distinction that relies less on the biological vs. social causation of inequalities than on the idea that society is morally responsible for some inequalities but not others. It maintains that securing fair equality of opportunity by eliminating such social inequalities has particularly high priority in distributive justice. Departing from Nagel, it argues that society (...)
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