Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate.John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   161 citations  
  • Managing Relationships with Environmental Stakeholders: A Study of U.K. Water and Electricity Utilities. [REVIEW]Brian Harvey & Anja Schaefer - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):243 - 260.
    In this paper we report a study of the approach of six U.K. water and electricity companies towards managing the relationship with their ''green'' stakeholders. Stakeholders are accorded increasing importance in political discourse and stakeholder theory is emerging as a promising framework for the analysis of corporate social performance.We studied the companies'' general approach towards green stakeholders, their dealings with specific stakeholder groups and whether they emphasised the consultation or the information aspect of stakeholder management. We found that none of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Evolution of a Definitional Construct.Archie B. Carroll - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (3):268-295.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   317 citations  
  • Stakeholder Influence on Corporate Strategies Over Time.Waymond Susana & Gago Rodgers - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):349 - 363.
    Modern management reporting on its company''s performance is influenced by individuals ethical considerations. Stakeholders philosophies have continued to change over the last 75 years affecting reporting systems for companies reporting information internally and externally. These fundamental changes in philosophy have affected how information is conveyed. We are not claiming that only one philosophical viewpoint dominates companies reporting practices, but there does appear to be a changing trend of philosophies building on one another. We use resource dependence theory in relationship to (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Business Ethics and Stakeholder Analysis.Kenneth E. Goodpaster - 1991 - Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):53-73.
    Much has been written about stakeholder analysis as a process by which to introduce ethical values into management decision-making. This paper takes a critical look at the assumptions behind this idea, in an effort to understand better the meaning of ethical management decisions.A distinction is made between stakeholder analysis and stakeholder synthesis. The two most natural kinds of stakeholder synthesis are then defined and discussed: strategic and multi-fiduciary. Paradoxically, the former appears to yield business without ethics and the latter appears (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   168 citations  
  • Business Ethics and Stakeholder Theory.Wesley Cragg - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):113-142.
    Abstract: Stakeholder theorists have typically offered both a business case and an ethics case for business ethics. I evaluate arguments for both approaches and find them wanting. I then shift the focus from ethics to law and ask: “Why should corporations obey the law?” Contrary to what shareholder theories typically imply, neoclassical or profit maximization theories of the firm can offer answers based only on instrumental justifications. Instrumental justifications for obeying the law, however, are pragmatically and normatively incoherent. This is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • Reasoning About Responsibilities: Mining Company Managers on What Stakeholders Are Owed. [REVIEW]Wesley Cragg & Alan Greenbaum - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (3):319 - 335.
    Stakeholder theories propose that managers are responsible not only for maximizing shareholder value, but also for taking into account the well being of other parties affected by corporate decisions. While the language of stakeholder theory has been taken up in industries like mining, controversy remains. Disagreements arise not only about the apportionment of costs and benefits among stakeholders, but about who counts as a stakeholder and about how "costs" and "benefits" are to be conceived. This paper investigates these questions empirically (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Change in Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective. [REVIEW]Bernadette M. Ruf, Krishnamurty Muralidhar, Robert M. Brown, Jay J. Janney & Karen Paul - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):143 - 156.
    Stakeholder theory provides a framework for investigating the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance. This relationship is investigated by examining how change in CSP is related to change in financial accounting measures. The findings provide some support for a tenet in stakeholder theory which asserts that the dominant stakeholder group, shareholders, financially benefit when management meets the demands of multiple stakeholders. Specifically, change in CSP was positively associated with growth in sales for the current and subsequent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • The Stakeholder Theory and the Common Good.Antonio Argandoña - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1093-1102.
    The theory of the social responsibility of the firm oscillates between two extremes: one that reduces the firm's responsibility to the obtainment of (the greatest possible) profit for its shareholders, and another that extends the firm's responsibility to include a wide range of actors with an interest or "stake" in the firm. The stakeholder theory of the social responsibility of business is more appealing from an ethical point of view, and yet it lacks a solid foundation that would be acceptable (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  • The Link Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: Evidence From the Banking Industry. [REVIEW]W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • Attitudes.George Y. Bizer, Jamie C. Barden & Richard E. Petty - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  • From the Editor.Thomas Jones - 1994 - Business and Society 33 (1):3-4.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate Twenty-Five Years of Incomparable Research.Jennifer J. Griffin & John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   174 citations  
  • Implementing the Social Audit in an Organization.Keith Davis & Robert Bromstrom - 1975 - Business and Society 16 (1):13-18.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Is There a Theory in Stakeholder Theory.Thomas M. Jones - 1994 - Business and Society 33 (1):98-101.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations