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Stephen Puryear (2012). Motion in Leibniz's Middle Years: A Compatibilist Approach.

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  1. Space and Relativity in Newton and Leibniz.Richard Arthur - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):219-240.
    In this paper I challenge the usual interpretations of Newton's and Leibniz's views on the nature of space and the relativity of motion. Newton's ‘relative space’ is not a reference frame; and Leibniz did not regard space as defined with respect to actual enduring bodies. Newton did not subscribe to the relativity of intertial motions; whereas Leibniz believed no body to be at rest, and Newton's absolute motion to be a useful fiction. A more accurate rendering of the opposition between (...)
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    Leibniz: An Introduction.C. D. Broad - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, first published in 1975, provides critical and comprehensive introduction to the philosophy of Leibniz.
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    Leibniz: Body, Substance, Monad.Daniel Garber - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Daniel Garber presents a study of Leibniz's conception of the physical world, elucidating his puzzling metaphysics of monads, mind-like simple substances.
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  4. Leibniz and Idealism.Daniel Garber - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. pp. 95--107.
     
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  5. Leibniz's Final System: Monads, Matter, and Animals.Glenn A. Hartz - 2007 - Routledge.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was one of the central figures of seventeenth-century philosophy, and a huge intellectual figure in his age. This book from Glenn A. Hartz is an advanced study of Leibniz's metaphysics. Hartz analyzes a very complicated topic, widely discussed in contemporary commentaries on Leibniz, namely the question of whether Leibniz was a metaphysical idealist, realist, or whether he tried to reconcile both trends in his mature philosophy. Because Leibniz is notoriously unclear about this, much has been written on (...)
     
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    Leibniz on Motion and the Equivalence of Hypotheses.Anja Jauernig - 2008 - The Leibniz Review 18:1-40.
    Contrary to popular belief, I argue that Leibniz is not hopelessly confused about motion: Leibniz is indeed both a relativist and an absolutist about motion, as suggested by the textual evidence, but, appearances to the contrary, this is not a problem; Leibniz’s infamous doctrine of the equivalence of hypotheses is well-supported and well-integrated within Leibniz’s physical theory; Leibniz’s assertion that the simplest hypothesis of several equivalent hypotheses can be held to be true can be explicated in such a way that (...)
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  7. Leibniz on Precise Shapes and the Corporeal World.Samuel Levey - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. pp. 69--94.
     
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    Leibniz on Relativity and the Motion of Bodies.Paul Lodge - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):277--308.
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    Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist.Adams Robert Merrihew - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Legendary since his own time as a universal genius, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) contributed significantly to almost every branch of learning. One of the creators of modern mathematics, and probably the most sophisticated logician between the Middle Ages and Frege, as well as a pioneer of ecumenical theology, he also wrote extensively on such diverse subjects as history, geology, and physics. But the part of his work that is most studied today is probably his writings in metaphysics, which have been (...)
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  10. Leibniz as Idealist.Donald Rutherford - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 4:141-90.
     
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