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  1. Semeiotic and the Cement of the Universe: A Peircean Process Approach to Causation.Menno Hulswit - 2001 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 37 (3):339 - 363.
  • Peirce and Communication.Jürgen Habermas - 1995 - In Kenneth Laine Ketner (ed.), Peirce and Contemporary Thought: Philosophical Inquiries. Fordham University Press. pp. 243--266.
     
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  • Peirce's Theory of Signs.T. L. Short - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, T. L. Short corrects widespread misconceptions of Peirce's theory of signs and demonstrates its relevance to contemporary analytic philosophy of language, mind and science. Peirce's theory of mind, naturalistic but nonreductive, bears on debates of Fodor and Millikan, among others. His theory of inquiry avoids foundationalism and subjectivism, while his account of reference anticipated views of Kripke and Putnam. Peirce's realism falls between 'internal' and 'metaphysical' realism and is more satisfactory than either. His pragmatism is not verificationism; (...)
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  • Semiosis and Pragmatism.João Queiroz & Floyd Merrell - 2006 - Sign Systems Studies 34 (1):37-64.
    Philosophers and social scientists of diverse orientations have suggested that the pragmatics of semiosis is germane to a dynamic account of meaning as process. Semiosis, the central focus of C. S. Peirce’s pragmatic philosophy, may hold a key to perennial problems regarding meaning. Indeed, Peirce’s thought should be deemed seminal when placed within the cognitive sciences, especially with respect to his concept of the sign. According to Peirce’s pragmatic model, semiosis is a triadic, time-bound, context-sensitive, interpreter-dependent, materially extended dynamic process. (...)
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  • A History of Philosophy in America.Elizabeth Flower & Murrey Murphey - 1977 - G.P.Putnam's Sons.
    This volume is part one of a two-volume set. Volume I: From the Puritans through Transcendentalism. Volume I: From the St. Louis Hegelians through C. I. Lewis.
     
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  • Peirce, Signs, and Meaning.Floyd Merrell - 1997 - University of Toronto Press.
     
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  • Semiosis as an Emergent Process.João Queiroz & Charbel Niño El-Hani - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):78-116.
    : In this paper, we intend to discuss if and in what sense semiosis (meaning process, cf. C. S. Peirce) can be regarded as an "emergent" process in semiotic systems. It is not our problem here to answer when or how semiosis emerged in nature. As a prerequisite for the very formulation of these problems, we are rather interested in discussing the conditions which should be fulfilled for semiosis to be characterized as an emergent process. The first step in this (...)
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  • Machine Mentality and the Nature of the Ground Relation.Darren Whobrey - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (3):307-346.
    John Searle distinguished between weak and strong artificial intelligence (AI). This essay discusses a third alternative, mild AI, according to which a machine may be capable of possessing a species of mentality. Using James Fetzer's conception of minds as semiotic systems, the possibility of what might be called ``mild AI'' receives consideration. Fetzer argues against strong AI by contending that digital machines lack the ground relationship required of semiotic systems. In this essay, the implementational nature of semiotic processes posited by (...)
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  • Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs. [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cognition is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition as computation across representations is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from their interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such — apart (...)
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  • Intelligence Without Representation – Merleau-Ponty's Critique of Mental Representation the Relevance of Phenomenology to Scientific Explanation.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):367-383.
    Existential phenomenologists hold that the two most basic forms of intelligent behavior, learning, and skillful action, can be described and explained without recourse to mind or brain representations. This claim is expressed in two central notions in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception: the intentional arc and the tendency to achieve a maximal grip. The intentional arc names the tight connection between body and world, such that, as the active body acquires skills, those skills are stored, not as representations in the mind, (...)
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  • Towards the Emergence of Meaning Processes in Computers From Peircean Semiotics.Antônio Gomes, Ricardo Gudwin, Charbel Niño El-Hani & João Queiroz - 2007 - Mind and Society 6 (2):173-187.
    In this work, we propose a computational approach to the triadic model of Peircean semiosis (meaning processes). We investigate theoretical constraints about the feasibility of simulated semiosis. These constraints, which are basic requirements for the simulation of semiosis, refer to the synthesis of irreducible triadic relations (Sign–Object–Interpretant). We examine the internal organization of the triad S–O–I, that is, the relative position of its elements and how they relate to each other. We also suggest a multi-level approach based on self-organization principles. (...)
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  • Frege: Philosophy of Language.Michael Dummett - 1973 - London: Duckworth.
    This highly acclaimed book is a major contribution to the philosophy of language as well as a systematic interpretation of Frege, indisputably the father of ...
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  • The Symbol Grounding Problem.Stevan Harnad - 1990 - Physica D 42:335-346.
    There has been much discussion recently about the scope and limits of purely symbolic models of the mind and about the proper role of connectionism in cognitive modeling. This paper describes the symbol grounding problem : How can the semantic interpretation of a formal symbol system be made intrinsic to the system, rather than just parasitic on the meanings in our heads? How can the meanings of the meaningless symbol tokens, manipulated solely on the basis of their shapes, be grounded (...)
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  • The Continuity of Peirce’s Thought.Kelly A. Parker - 1998 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    A comprehensive and systematic reconstruction of the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, perhaps America's most far-ranging and original philosopher, which reveals the unity of his complex and influential body of thought. We are still in the early stages of understanding the thought of C. S. Peirce (1839-1914). Although much good work has been done in isolated areas, relatively little considers the Peircean system as a whole. Peirce made it his life's work to construct a scientifically sophisticated and logically rigorous philosophical (...)
  • Process Metaphysics. An Introduction to Process Philosophy.Nicholas Rescher - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Presents a synoptic, compact, and accessible exposition of this influential and interesting sector of twentieth-century American philosophy.
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  • Dialogic Semiosis: An Essay on Signs and Meaning.Jorgen Dines JOHANSEN - 1993 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 30 (1):155-166.
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  • Charles Peirce's Pragmatic Pluralism.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 1994 - State University of New York Press.
    This work runs counter to the traditional interpretations of Peirce's philosophy by eliciting an inherent strand of pragmatic pluralism that is embedded in the very core of his thought and that weaves his various doctrines into a systematic ...
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  • Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language.Saul A. Kripke - 1982 - Harvard University Press.
    In this book Saul Kripke brings his powerful philosophical intelligence to bear on Wittgenstein's analysis of the notion of following a rule.
  • Charles S. Peirce on Norms & Ideals.Vincent G. Potter - 1967 - Fordham University Press.
    In recent years, Charles Sanders Peirce has emerged, in the eyes of philosophers both in America and abroad, as one of America’s major philosophical thinkers. His work has forced us back to philosophical reflection about those basic issues that inevitably confront us as human beings, especially in an age of science. Peirce’s concern for experience, for what is actually encountered, means that his philosophy, even in its most technical aspects, forms a reflective commentary on actual life and on the world (...)
     
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  • The Development of Peirce's Philosophy.Murray G. Murphey - 1961 - Cambridge: Mass., Harvard University Press.
    Introduction IT is generally agreed that Charles Sanders Peirce was one of America's greatest philosophers, yet even today there is little agreement as to ...
  • Being There: Putting Brain, Body and World Together Again.Andy Clark - 1997 - MIT Press.
    In treating cognition as problem solving, Andy Clark suggests, we may often abstract too far from the very body and world in which our brains evolved to guide...
  • Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce.Charles S. Peirce - 1931 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    PRINCIPLES OF PHILOSOPHY" CHAPTER 1 LESSONS FROM THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY §1. NOMINALISM* 15. Very early in my studies of logic, before I had really been ...
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  • Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea.John Haugeland - 1985 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    The idea that human thinking and machine computing are "radically the same" provides the central theme for this marvelously lucid and witty book on...
  • Cognition in the Wild.Edwin Hutchins - 1995 - MIT Press.
    Hutchins examines a set of phenomena that have fallen between the established disciplines of psychology and anthropology, bringing to light a new set of relationships between culture and cognition.
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  • Extending Ourselves: Computational Science, Empiricism, and Scientific Method.Paul Humphreys - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Computational methods have become the dominant technique in many areas of science. This book contains the first systematic philosophical account of these new methods and their consequences for scientific method. This book will be of interest to philosophers of science and to anyone interested in the role played by computers in modern science.
     
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  • Symbol Grounding: A New Look at an Old Idea.Ron Sun - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):149-172.
    Symbols should be grounded, as has been argued before. But we insist that they should be grounded not only in subsymbolic activities, but also in the interaction between the agent and the world. The point is that concepts are not formed in isolation (from the world), in abstraction, or "objectively." They are formed in relation to the experience of agents, through their perceptual/motor apparatuses, in their world and linked to their goals and actions. This paper takes a detailed look at (...)
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  • Anti-Representationalism and the Dynamical Stance.Anthony Chemero - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (4):625-647.
    Arguments in favor of anti-representationalism in cognitive science often suffer from a lack of attention to detail. The purpose of this paper is to fill in the gaps in these arguments, and in so doing show that at least one form of anti- representationalism is potentially viable. After giving a teleological definition of representation and applying it to a few models that have inspired anti- representationalist claims, I argue that anti-representationalism must be divided into two distinct theses, one ontological, one (...)
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  • A Stroll Through the Worlds of Robots and Animals: Applying Jakob von Uexkülls Theory of Meaning to Adaptive Robots and Artificial Life.Tom Ziemke & Noel E. Sharkey - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134).
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  • Peirce's Approach to the Self: A Semiotic Perspective on Human Subjectivity.Vincent M. Colapietro - 1988 - State University of New York Press.
    Based on a careful study of his unpublished manuscripts as well as his published work, this book explores Peirce's general theory of signs and the way in which Peirce himself used this theory to understand subjectivity.
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  • Reconstructing the Cognitive World: The Next Step.Michael Wheeler - 2007 - Bradford.
    In _Reconstructing the Cognitive World_, Michael Wheeler argues that we should turn away from the generically Cartesian philosophical foundations of much contemporary cognitive science research and proposes instead a Heideggerian approach. Wheeler begins with an interpretation of Descartes. He defines Cartesian psychology as a conceptual framework of explanatory principles and shows how each of these principles is part of the deep assumptions of orthodox cognitive science. Wheeler then turns to Heidegger's radically non-Cartesian account of everyday cognition, which, he argues, can (...)
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  • The Resistance of Reference: Linguistics, Philosophy, and the Literary Text.Ora Avni - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (3):258-260.
  • Some Leading Ideas of Peirce’s Semiotic.Joseph Ransdell - 1977 - Semiotica 19 (3-4):157-178.
  • Speaker's Reference and Semantic Reference.Saul A. Kripke - 1977 - In Peter A. French, Theodore E. Uehling Jr & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Studies in the Philosophy of Language. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 255-296.
    am going to discuss some issues inspired by a well-known paper ofKeith Donnellan, "Reference and Definite Descriptions,”2 but the interest—to me—of the contrast mentioned in my title goes beyond Donnellan's paper: I think it is of considerable constructive as well as critical importance to the philosophy oflanguage. These applications, however, and even everything I might want to say relative to Donnellan’s paper, cannot be discussed in full here because of problems of length. Moreover, although I have a considerable interest in (...)
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  • Principles of Biological Autonomy.F. Varela - 1979
  • Translations From the Philosophical Writings of Gottlob Frege.Gottlob Frege - 1952 - Blackwell.
  • Grounding Words in Perception and Action: Computational Insights.Deb Roy - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):389-396.
  • Generative and Discriminative Models of Categorization.Deb Roy - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):389-396.
  • Signs of Meaning in the Universe.Jesper Hoffmeyer - 1996
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  • Peirce's Theory of Signs as Foundation for Pragmatism.John Joseph Fitzgerald - 1966 - The Hague: Mouton.
  • Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1985 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
  • Order Out of Chaos: Man's New Dialogue with Nature.I. Prigogine - 1984 - Random House.
  • Philosophy and Our Mental Life.Hilary Putnam - 1975 - In Mind, Language, and Reality. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  • Studies in the Logic of Charles Sanders Peirce.Nathan Houser, Don D. Roberts, James Van Evra & Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 1997 - Philosophische Rundschau 51 (3):193-211.
    This volume represents an important contribution to Peirce’s work in mathematics and formal logic. An internationally recognized group of scholars explores and extends understandings of Peirce’s most advanced work. The stimulating depth and originality of Peirce’s thought and the continuing relevance of his ideas are brought out by this major book.
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  • Gibsonian Affordances for Roboticists.Anthony Chemero & Michael T. Turvey - unknown
    Using hypersets as an analytic tool, we compare traditionally Gibsonian (Chemero 2003; Turvey 1992) and representationalist (Sahin et al. this issue) understandings of the notion ‘affordance’. We show that representationalist understandings are incompatible with direct perception and erect barriers between animal and environment. They are, therefore, scarcely recognizable as understandings of ‘affordance’. In contrast, Gibsonian understandings are shown to treat animal-environment systems as unified complex systems and to be compatible with direct perception. We discuss the fruitful connections between Gibsonian affordances (...)
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  • Course in General Linguistics.Ferdinand De Saussure, Charles Bally, Albert Sechehaye, Albert Riedlinger & Roy Harris - 1987 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49 (1):125-127.
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  • The Machinery of Talk: Charles Peirce and the Sign Hypothesis.Anne Freadman - 2004 - Stanford University Press.
    Freadman uses the term genre to access Peirce’s work, and expands this original theoretical approach by proposing that “genre” interacts with “sign” and that this interaction is central to the study of the semiotic in general.
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  • The Relevance of Peircean Semiotic to Computational Intelligence Augmentation.Joseph Ransdell - manuscript
    This is a copy of the Proceedings version of a paper presented at the Workshop on Computational Intelligence and Semiotics, organized by João Queiroz and Ricardo Gudwin, held at Itaú Cultural, São Paulo, Brazil, on 8-9 October, 2002. (This version contains material not actually delivered at the conference.) Queiroz and Gudwin will be releasing the Proceedings volume on a..
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  • Reflections on the Role of the Communicative Sign in Semeiotic.Mats Bergman - 2000 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 36 (2):225 - 254.
  • The Relevance of Charles Peirce.Eugene Freeman (ed.) - 1983 - Hegeler Institute.