Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1522 citations  
  • John Dewey's Ethics: Democracy as Experience.Gregory Pappas - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    John Dewey, widely known as "America's philosopher," provided important insights into education and political philosophy, but surprisingly never set down a complete moral or ethical philosophy. Gregory Fernando Pappas presents the first systematic and comprehensive treatment of Dewey's ethics. By providing a pluralistic account of moral life that is both unified and coherent, Pappas considers ethics to be key to an understanding of Dewey's other philosophical insights, especially his views on democracy. Pappas unfolds Dewey's ethical vision by looking carefully at (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • The American Pragmatists.Cheryl Misak - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Cheryl Misak presents a history of the great American philosophical tradition of pragmatism, from its inception in the 1870s to the present day. She traces the connections between classical American pragmatism and contemporary analytic philosophy, and draws out the continuing influence of pragmatist ideas in the recent history of philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • The Need for Systematic Reviews of Reasons.Neema Sofaer & Daniel Strech - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (6):315-328.
    There are many ethical decisions in the practice of health research and care, and in the creation of policy and guidelines. We argue that those charged with making such decisions need a new genre of review. The new genre is an application of the systematic review, which was developed over decades to inform medical decision-makers about what the totality of studies that investigate links between smoking and cancer, for example, implies about whether smoking causes cancer. We argue that there is (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology.C. E. Ayres - 1922 - Journal of Philosophy 19 (17):469-475.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   255 citations  
  • Beyond Consent in Research.Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Vulnerability in Research and Health Care; Describing the Elephant in the Room?Samia A. Hurst - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (4):191–202.
    Despite broad agreement that the vulnerable have a claim to special protection, defining vulnerable persons or populations has proved more difficult than we would like. This is a theoretical as well as a practical problem, as it hinders both convincing justifications for this claim and the practical application of required protections. In this paper, I review consent-based, harm-based, and comprehensive definitions of vulnerability in healthcare and research with human subjects. Although current definitions are subject to critique, their underlying assumptions may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  • Beyond Consent in Research: Revisiting Vulnerability in Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders.Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana & Laura Macdonald - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Dewey's Conception of Growth Reconsidered.Daniel Pekarsky - 1990 - Educational Theory 40 (3):283-294.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology.John Dewey - 1923 - Mind 32 (125):79-86.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations