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  1. A Theory of Crimes Against Humanity.David Luban - unknown
    The answer I offer in this Article is that crimes against humanity assault one particular aspect of human being, namely our character as political animals. We are creatures whose nature compels us to live socially, but who cannot do so without artificial political organization that inevitably poses threats to our well-being, and, at the limit, to our very survival. Crimes against humanity represent the worst of those threats; they are the limiting case of politics gone cancerous. Precisely because we cannot (...)
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  • A Criticism of the International Harm Principle.Massimo Renzo - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):267-282.
    According to the received view crimes like torture, rape, enslavement or enforced prostitution are domestic crimes if they are committed as isolated or sporadic events, but become crimes against humanity when they are committed as part of a ‘widespread or systematic attack’ against a civilian population. Only in the latter case can these crimes be prosecuted by the international community. One of the most influential accounts of this idea is Larry May’s International Harm Principle, which states that crimes against humanity (...)
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  • Fairness to Rightness: Jurisdiction, Legality, and the Legitimacy of International Criminal Law.David Luban - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
  • What is a Crime?Grant Lamond - 2007 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (4):609-632.
    This article presents a philosophical account of the nature of crime. It argues that the criminal law contains both fault-based crimes and strict liability offences, and that these two represent different paradigms of liability. It goes on to argue that the gist of fault-based crimes lies in their being public wrongs, not (as is often thought) because they wrong the public, but because the public is responsible for punishing them, i.e. because they merit state punishment. What makes wrongs deserving of (...)
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  • Beyond Moral Minimalism.David Luban - 2006 - Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):353-360.
  • What is Crime Against Humanity?Richard Vernon - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (3):231–249.
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  • A Defense of International Criminal Law.Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2004 - Ethics 115 (1):35-67.
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  • Authority and Responsibility in International Criminal Law.R. A. Duff - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), Philosophy of International Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 589-604.
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