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  1. Force (God) in Descartes' Physics.Gary C. Hatfield - 1979 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (2):113-140.
    It is difficult to evaluate the role of activity - of force or of that which has causal efficacy - in Descartes’ natural philosophy. On the one hand, Descartes claims to include in his natural philosophy only that which can be described geometrically, which amounts to matter (extended substance) in motion (where this motion is described kinematically).’ Yet on the other hand, rigorous adherence to a purely geometrical description of matter in motion would make it difficult to account for the (...)
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  • Occasionalism and Efficacious Laws in Malebranche.Nicholas Jolley - 2002 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):245–257.
  • The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures.Lawrence Nolan - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):169–194.
    In the Fifth Meditation, Descartes makes a remarkable claim about the ontological status of geometrical figures. He asserts that an object such as a triangle has a 'true and immutable nature' that does not depend on the mind, yet has being even if there are no triangles existing in the world. This statement has led many commentators to assume that Descartes is a Platonist regarding essences and in the philosophy of mathematics. One problem with this seemingly natural reading is that (...)
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  • Descartes's Nomic Concurrentism: Finite Causation and Divine Concurrence.Andrew Pessin - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):25-49.
  • Malebranche and Occasionalism: A Reply to Steven Nadler.Desmond M. Clarke - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):499-504.
    In Malebranche's account of occasional causality, God exercises his general will with respect to every event that merits a causal explanation. Nadler distinguishes two pictures of God's involvement; (1) there are as many distinct acts of God's will as there are causal events to be explained; (2) God's will is exercised once only, when the natural order of causes is created. I argue that Malebranche's concept of God is inconsistent with a real distinction between God and acts of his will, (...)
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  • Occasionalism and General Will in Malebranche.Steven M. Nadler - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):31-47.
    This paper examines a common misreading of the mechanics of Malebranche's doctrine of divine causal agency, occasionalism, and its roots in a related misreading of Malebranche's theories. God, contrary to this misreading, is for Malebranche constantly and actively causally engaged in the world, and does not just establish certain laws of nature. The key is in understanding just what Malebranche means by general volitions'.
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  • Malebranche's Distinction Between General and Particular Volitions.Andrew Pessin - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):77-99.
  • Descartes on the Creation of the Eternal Truths.E. M. Curley - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (4):569-597.
  • Descartes's Theory of Modality.Jonathan Bennett - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):639-667.
    Descartes propounded the allegedly "strange", "peculiar", "curious" and "incoherent" doctrine that necessary truths are made true by God's voluntary act. It is generally held that this doctrine must be kept out of sight while other Cartesian topics are being discussed. This paper offers an interpretation of this Cartesian doctrine under which it comes out as reasonable, consistent with the rest of his philosophy, and possible even true. According to this interpretation--which is more respectful of and close to Descartes's text than (...)
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  • Malebranche's Theodicy.Andrew G. Black - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):27-44.
    Malebranche's Theodicy ANDREW G. BLACK LEIBNIZ'S SOLUTION tO the problem of evil, his theodicy, might be regarded as a paradigm of philosophical theology. Its pattern, as with so much of Leibniz's philosophy, is reconciliation of deep metaphysical truth with recalcitrant ap- pearance. Thus, a theodicy is not just any solution to the problem; strictly speaking it is a vindication of divine providence in the face of the challenge posed by apparent imperfections of all kinds in creation.' The preeminence of Leibniz's (...)
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  • Descartes on the Creation of the Eternal Truths.Harry Frankfurt - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (1):36-57.
  • Natures, Laws, and Miracles: The Roots of Leibniz's Critique of Occasionalism.Donald Rutherford - 1993 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), Causation in Early Modern Philosophy. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 135--58.
    Leibniz raises three main objections to the doctrine of occasionalism: (1) it is inconsistent with the supposition of finite substances; (2) it presupposes the occurrence of "perpetual miracles"; (3) it requires that God "disturb" the ordinary laws of nature. At issue in objection (1) is the proper understanding of divine omnipotence, and of the relationship between the power of God and that of created things. I argue that objections (2) and (3), on the other hand, derive from a particular conception (...)
     
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  • Necessity and Physical Laws in Descartes's Philosophy.Janet Broughton - 1987 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3/4):205.
    I argue that although in his earlier work descartes thought of the laws of motion as "eternal truths," he later came to think of them as truths whose necessity is of a different type.
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  • Indifference, Necessity, and Descartes's Derivation of the Laws of Motion.Blake D. Dutton - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):193-212.
    Indifference, Necessity, and Descartes's Derivation of the Laws of Motion BLAKE D. DUTTON WHILE WORKING ON Le Monde, his first comprehensive scientific treatise, Des- cartes writes the following to Mersenne: "I think that all those to whom God has given the use of this reason have an obligation to employ it principally in the endeavor to know him and to know themselves. This is the task with which I began my studies; and I can say that I would not have (...)
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  • Occasionalism and the Mind-Body Problem.Steven Nadler - 1997 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
  • Occasionalism and the Cartesian Metaphysic of Motion.T. M. Lennon - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 1 (1):29.
     
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  • Malebranche's Occasionalism: A Reply to Clarke.Steven M. Nadler - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):505-508.