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  1. Descartes on Causation.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    This book is a systematic study of Descartes' theory of causation and its relation to the medieval and early modern scholastic philosophy that provides its proper historical context. The argument presented here is that even though Descartes offered a dualistic ontology that differs radically from what we find in scholasticism, his views on causation were profoundly influenced by scholastic thought on this issue. This influence is evident not only in his affirmation in the Meditations of the abstract scholastic axioms that (...)
  • Physiologia: Natural Philosophy in Late Aristotelian and Cartesian Thought.Dennis Des Chene - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    Physiologia provides an accessible and comprehensive guide to late Aristotelian natural philosophy; with that context in hand, it offers new interpretations of major themes in Descartes’s natural philosophy.
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  • The Search After Truth.Nicolas Malebranche - 1991 - In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Early Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
  • Cartesian Causation: Body–Body Interaction, Motion, and Eternal Truths Tad M. SchmaltzE-Mail The Corresponding Author.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (4):737-762.
    There is considerable debate among scholars over whether Descartes allowed for genuine body–body interaction. I begin by considering Michael Della Rocca’s recent claim that Descartes accepted such interaction, and that his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths indicates how this interaction could be acceptable to him. Though I agree that Descartes was inclined to accept real bodily causes of motion, I differ from Della Rocca in emphasizing that his ontology ultimately does not allow for them. This is not (...)
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  • Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion.Nicolas Malebranche - 1923 - Cambridge University Press.
    Malebranche's Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion is in many ways the best introduction to his thought, and provides the most systematic exposition of his philosophy as a whole. In it, he presents clear and comprehensive statements of his two best-known contributions to metaphysics and epistemology, namely, the doctrines of occasionalism and vision in God; he also states his views on such central issues as self-knowledge, the existence of the external world and the problem of theodicy. His skilful handling of (...)
  • Occasionalism and Mechanism: Fontenelle's Objections to Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):293 – 313.
  • The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, Vol. 3: Correspondence, Trans. By John G. Cottingham, Robert Stoothof, Dugald Murdoch, and Anthony Kenny.René Descartes - 1991 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The Philosophical Writings of Descartes VOLUME 3. Volumes 1 and 2 provide a completely new translation of many of the major works in metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy.
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  • Force (God) in Descartes' Physics.Gary C. Hatfield - 1979 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (2):113-140.
    It is difficult to evaluate the role of activity - of force or of that which has causal efficacy - in Descartes’ natural philosophy. On the one hand, Descartes claims to include in his natural philosophy only that which can be described geometrically, which amounts to matter (extended substance) in motion (where this motion is described kinematically).’ Yet on the other hand, rigorous adherence to a purely geometrical description of matter in motion would make it difficult to account for the (...)
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  • Descartes's Nomic Concurrentism: Finite Causation and Divine Concurrence.Andrew Pessin - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):25-49.
  • The Problem of Secondary Causation in Descartes: A Response to Des Chene.Helen Hattab - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (2):93-118.
    : In this paper I address the vexed question of secondary causation in René Descartes' physics, and examine several influential interpretations, especially the one recently proposed by Dennis Des Chene. I argue that interpreters who regard Cartesian bodies as real secondary causes, on the grounds that the modes of body include real forces, contradict Descartes' account of modes. On the other hand, those who deny that Descartes affirms secondary causation, on the grounds that forces cannot be modes of extension, commit (...)
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  • Occasionalism and the Cartesian Metaphysic of Motion.T. M. Lennon - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (sup1):29-40.
  • “Quantum in Se Est”.I. Bernard Cohen - 1964 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 38:36-46.
  • Occasionalism and General Will in Malebranche.Steven M. Nadler - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):31-47.
    This paper examines a common misreading of the mechanics of Malebranche's doctrine of divine causal agency, occasionalism, and its roots in a related misreading of Malebranche's theories. God, contrary to this misreading, is for Malebranche constantly and actively causally engaged in the world, and does not just establish certain laws of nature. The key is in understanding just what Malebranche means by general volitions'.
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  • Malebranche's Distinction Between General and Particular Volitions.Andrew Pessin - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):77-99.
  • Descartes’s Changing Mind.Peter Machamer & J. E. McGuire - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):398-419.
    Descartes is always concerned about knowledge. However, the Galileo affair in 1633, the reactions to his Discourse on method, and later his need to reply to objections to his Meditations provoked crises in Descartes’s intellectual development the import of which has not been sufficiently recognized. These events are the major reasons why Descartes’s philosophical position concerning how we know and what we may know is radically different at the end of his life from what it was when he began. We (...)
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  • Malebranche's Theodicy.Andrew G. Black - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (1):27-44.
    Malebranche's Theodicy ANDREW G. BLACK LEIBNIZ'S SOLUTION tO the problem of evil, his theodicy, might be regarded as a paradigm of philosophical theology. Its pattern, as with so much of Leibniz's philosophy, is reconciliation of deep metaphysical truth with recalcitrant ap- pearance. Thus, a theodicy is not just any solution to the problem; strictly speaking it is a vindication of divine providence in the face of the challenge posed by apparent imperfections of all kinds in creation.' The preeminence of Leibniz's (...)
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  • Occasionalism: Causation Among the Cartesians.Steven Nadler - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    These essays examine the philosophical, scientific, theological and religious themes and arguments of occasionalism, as well as its roots in medieval views on ...
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  • Force and Inertia in the Seventeenth Century: Descartes and Newton.Alan Gabbey - 1980 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Descartes: Philosophy, Mathematics and Physics. Barnes & Noble. pp. 230--320.
     
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  • The Metaphysics and Physics of Force in Descartes.Martial Gueroult - 1980 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Descartes: Philosophy, Mathematics and Physics. Harvester Press. pp. 196--229.
     
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  • Descartes Selon l'Ordre des Raisons.Martial Guéroult - 1953 - Aubier.
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  • Descartes's Changing Mind.Peter K. Machamer - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first book to focus on Descartes's changing views, and it is welcome."--Roger Ariew, University of South Florida.
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  • If a Body Meet a Body.Michael Della Rocca - 1999 - In Gennaro Rocco & Huenemann Charles (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford University Press.
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  • Occasionalism and the Cartesian Metaphysic of Motion.T. M. Lennon - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 1 (1):29.
     
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  • Malebranche's Occasionalism: A Reply to Clarke.Steven M. Nadler - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):505-508.