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  1. What is Apophaticism? Ways of Talking About an Ineffable God.Scott Michael & Citron Gabriel - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):23--49.
    Apophaticism -- the view that God is both indescribable and inconceivable -- is one of the great medieval traditions of philosophical thought about God, but it is largely overlooked by analytic philosophers of religion. This paper attempts to rehabilitate apophaticism as a serious philosophical option. We provide a clear formulation of the position, examine what could appropriately be said and thought about God if apophaticism is true, and consider ways to address the charge that apophaticism is self-defeating. In so doing (...)
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  • Does Faith Entail Belief?Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (2):142-162.
    Does faith that p entail belief that p? If faith that p is identical with belief that p, it does. But it isn’t. Even so, faith that p might be necessarily partly constituted by belief that p, or at least entail it. Of course, even if faith that p entails belief that p, it does not follow that faith that p is necessarily partly constituted by belief that p. Still, showing that faith that p entails belief that p would be (...)
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  • Why I Am Not a Nominalist.John P. Burgess - 1983 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 24 (1):93-105.
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  • Can an Atheist Believe in God?Andrew S. Eshleman - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (2):183 - 199.
    Some have proposed that it is reasonable for an atheist to pursue a form of life shaped by engagement with theistic religious language and practice, once language and belief in God are interpreted in the appropriate non-realist manner. My aim is to defend this proposal in the face of several objections that have been raised against it. First, I engage in some conceptual spadework to distinguish more clearly some varieties of religious non-realism. Then, in response to two central objections, I (...)
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  • Authentic Faith and Acknowledged Risk: Dissolving the Problem of Faith and Reason.Daniel J. Mckaughan - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (1):101-124.
    One challenge to the rationality of religious commitment has it that faith is unreasonable because it involves believing on insufficient evidence. However, this challenge and influential attempts to reply depend on assumptions about what it is to have faith that are open to question. I distinguish between three conceptions of faith each of which can claim some plausible grounding in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. Questions about the rationality or justification of religious commitment and the extent of compatibility with doubt look different (...)
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  • Philosophy of Religion, Fictionalism, and Religious Diversity.Victoria S. Harrison - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1-3):43-58.
    Until recently philosophy of religion has been almost exclusively focused upon the analysis of western religious ideas. The central concern of the discipline has been the concept God , as that concept has been understood within Judaeo-Christianity. However, this narrow remit threatens to render philosophy of religion irrelevant today. To avoid this philosophy of religion should become a genuinely multicultural discipline. But how, if at all, can philosophy of religion rise to this challenge? The paper considers fictionalism about religious discourse (...)
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  • Affective Theism and People of Faith.Jonathan L. Kvanvig - 2013 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 37 (1):109-128.
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts by Kendall Walton. [REVIEW]Gregory Currie - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (7):367-370.
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  • A Critique of Religious Fictionalism.Benjamin S. Cordry - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):77-89.
    Andrew Eshleman has argued that atheists can believe in God by being fully engaged members of religious communities and using religious discourse in a non-realist way. He calls this position 'fictionalism' because the atheist takes up religion as a useful fiction. In this paper I critique fictionalism along two lines: that it is problematic to successfully be a fictionalist and that fictionalism is unjustified. Reflection on fictionalism will point to some wider problems with religious anti-realism.
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  • The Afterlife: Beyond Belief.Andrew Eshleman - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 80 (2):163-183.
    When a Christian refers to the future full realization of the kingdom of God in an afterlife, it is typically assumed that she is expressing beliefs about the existence and activity of God in conjunction with supernatural beliefs about an otherworldly realm and the possibility of one’s personal survival after bodily death. In other words, the religious language is interpreted in a realist fashion and the religious person here is construed as a religious believer. A corollary of this widely-held realist (...)
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  • The Significance of Religious Experience.Howard Wettstein - 2009 - Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):381-398.
    This book is collection of published and unpublished essays on the philosophy of religion by Howard Wettstein.
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  • The Kantian Moral Hazard Argument for Religious Fictionalism.Christopher Jay - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):207-232.
    In this paper I do three things. Firstly, I defend the view that in his most familiar arguments about morality and the theological postulates, the arguments which appeal to the epistemological doctrines of the first Critique, Kant is as much of a fictionalist as anybody not working explicitly with that conceptual apparatus could be: his notion of faith as subjectively and not objectively grounded is precisely what fictionalists are concerned with in their talk of nondoxastic attitudes. Secondly, I reconstruct a (...)
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  • Religious Fictionalism Defended: Reply to Cordry.Andrew Eshleman - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):91-96.
    In his paper, 'A critique of religious fictionalism', Benjamin Cordry raises a series of objections to a fictionalist form of religious non-realism that I proposed in my earlier paper, 'Can an atheist believe in God?'. They fall into two main categories: those alleging that an atheist would be unjustified in adopting fictionalism, and those alleging that fictionalism could not be successfully implemented, or practised communally. I argue that these objections can be met.
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  • A Modal Fictionalist Result.John Divers - 1999 - Noûs 33 (3):317-346.
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  • Replies to My Colleagues.Jl Schellenberg - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (2):257-285.
  • Religion for Naturalists.Natalja Deng - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):195-214.
    Some naturalists feel an affinity with some religions, or with a particular religion. They may have previously belonged to it, and/or been raised in it, and/or be close to people who belong to it, and/or simply feel attracted to its practices, texts and traditions. This raises the question of whether and to what extent a naturalist can lead the life of a religious believer. The sparse literature on this topic focuses on religious fictionalism. I also frame the debate in these (...)
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  • An Essay on Belief and Acceptance.Joseph Moore & L. Jonathan Cohen - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):705.
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  • An Interpretation of Religion: Human Responses to the Transcendent.John Hick - 1990 - Philosophy East and West 40 (4):557-562.
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  • Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief.John Bishop - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (2):107-109.
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  • Metaphor and Religious Language. [REVIEW]William P. Alston - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (4):595-597.
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  • Lectures and Conversations on Aesthetics, Psychology and Religious Belief.Ludwig Wittgenstein & Cyril Barrett - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (4):554-557.
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  • Truth in Fiction.David Lewis - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
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  • Propositional Faith: What It is and What It is Not.Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):357-372.
    Reprinted in Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology, Wadsworth 2015, 6th edition, eds Michael Rea and Louis Pojman. What is propositional faith? At a first approximation, we might answer that it is the psychological attitude picked out by standard uses of the English locution “S has faith that p,” where p takes declarative sentences as instances, as in “He has faith that they’ll win”. Although correct, this answer is not nearly as informative as we might like. Many people say that there (...)
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  • Christianity and Paradox.William P. Alston & Ronald W. Hepburn - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (1):118.
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  • The Philosophy of 'As If.'.E. Jordan & H. Vaihinger - 1926 - Philosophical Review 35 (4):370.
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  • A Paradox of Existence.Stephen Yablo - 2000 - In T. Hofweber & A. Everett (eds.), Empty Names, Fiction, and the Puzzles of Non-Existence. CSLI Publications. pp. 275--312.
    ontology metaontology wright platonism fregean existence epistemology.
     
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  • The Myth of Morality.Richard Joyce - 2001 - Mind 113 (452):760-763.
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  • Can It Be Rational to Have Faith?Lara Buchak - 2012 - In Jake Chandler & Victoria Harrison (eds.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 225.
    This paper provides an account of what it is to have faith in a proposition p, in both religious and mundane contexts. It is argued that faith in p doesn’t require adopting a degree of belief that isn’t supported by one’s evidence but rather it requires terminating one’s search for further evidence and acting on the supposition that p. It is then shown, by responding to a formal result due to I.J. Good, that doing so can be rational in a (...)
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  • Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion.J. L. Schellenberg - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):113-117.
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  • Modal Fictionalism.Gideon Rosen - 1990 - Mind 99 (395):327-354.
  • Religious Language.Michael Scott - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (6):505-515.
    This study reviews some of the principal themes in contemporary work on religious language. Unlike other recent surveys, the most pressing issues about religious language are addressed from the perspective of the philosophy of language; different positions taken on these issues by philosophers of religion and theologians are considered. Topics that are covered include: the subject matter of religious discourse, reductionism and subjectivism, expressivism, the nature of religious metaphor, religious fictionalism and truth in religious discourse. The study also looks at (...)
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  • An Empiricist's View of the Nature of Religious Belief.R. B. Braithwaite - 1956 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 11 (3):488-489.
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  • Science Without Numbers.Hartry H. Field - 1982 - Synthese 51 (2):283-291.
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  • Religious Fictionalism Defended: Reply to Cordry: Andrew Eshleman.Andrew Eshleman - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):91-96.
    In his paper, ‘A critique of religious fictionalism’, Benjamin Cordry raises a series of objections to a fictionalist form of religious non-realism that I proposed in my earlier paper, ‘Can an atheist believe in God?’. They fall into two main categories: those alleging that an atheist would be unjustified in adopting fictionalism, and those alleging that fictionalism could not be successfully implemented, or practised communally. I argue that these objections can be met.
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  • Schellenberg on Propositional Faith.Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2013 - Religious Studies (2):181-194.
    This paper assesses J. L. Schellenberg’s account of propositional faith and, in light of that assessment, sketches an alternative that avoids certain objections and coheres better with Schellenberg’s aims.
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  • A Critique of Religious Fictionalism: BENJAMIN S. CORDRY.Benjamin S. Cordry - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):77-89.
    Andrew Eshleman has argued that atheists can believe in God by being fully engaged members of religious communities and using religious discourse in a non-realist way. He calls this position ‘fictionalism’ because the atheist takes up religion as a useful fiction. In this paper I critique fictionalism along two lines: that it is problematic to successfully be a fictionalist and that fictionalism is unjustified. Reflection on fictionalism will point to some wider problems with religious anti-realism.
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