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  1. Reply to My Critics: A Response to Reviews of Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution. [REVIEW]Michael J. Behe - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (5):683-707.
    In Darwin's Black Box: The BiochemicalChallenge to Evolution I argued thatpurposeful intelligent design, rather thanDarwinian natural selection, better explainssome aspects of the complexity that modernscience has discovered at the molecularfoundation of life. In the five years since itspublication the book has been widely discussedand has received considerable criticism. Here Irespond to what I deem to be the mostfundamental objections. In the first part ofthe article I address empirical criticismsbased on experimental studies alleging eitherthat biochemical systems I discussed are notirreducibly complex (...)
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  • The Fall and Foundations.Edward Grant - 2009 - Metascience 18 (1):43-51.
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  • Peter Harrison, The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xi+300. ISBN 978-0-521-87559-2. £50.00. [REVIEW]Stephen Gaukroger - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (2):294.
  • How Not to Detect DesignThe Design Inference. William A. Dembski.Brandon Fitelson, Christopher Stephens & Elliott Sober - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):472-488.
    As every philosopher knows, “the design argument” concludes that God exists from premisses that cite the adaptive complexity of organisms or the lawfulness and orderliness of the whole universe. Since 1859, it has formed the intellectual heart of creationist opposition to the Darwinian hypothesis that organisms evolved their adaptive features by the mindless process of natural selection. Although the design argument developed as a defense of theism, the logic of the argument in fact encompasses a larger set of issues. William (...)
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  • Isaac Newton, Heretic: The Strategies of a Nicodemite.Stephen D. Snobelen - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Science 32 (4):381-419.
    There was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews: the same came to Jesus by night…John 3: 1–2A lady asked the famous Lord Shaftesbury what religion he was of. He answered the religion of wise men. She asked, what was that? He answered, wise men never tell.Diary of Viscount Percival , i, 113NEWTON AS HERETICIsaac Newton was a heretic. But like Nicodemus, the secret disciple of Jesus, he never made a public declaration of his private (...)
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  • Popper and Maxwell on Scientific Progress.Leemon McHenry - 2009 - In Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Maxwell. Frankfurt, Germany: pp. 233-248.
    Karl Popper's celebrated theory of falsification provides a rigorous view of science but it has been criticized as failing to explain how science makes progress. In this essay, I compare Popper's falsificationism with Nicholas Maxwell's aim-oriented empiricism and examine the role that metaphysics plays in explaining scientific progress.
     
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  • Religion and the Rise of Modern Science.R. Hooykaas - 1974 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 36 (1):170-170.
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  • Seeing Through the Scholium: Religion and Reading Newton in the Eighteenth Century.Larry Stewart - 1996 - History of Science 34 (2):123-165.
  • An Empiricist's View of the Nature of Religious Belief.R. B. Braithwaite - 1956 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 11 (3):488-489.
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  • Nonoverlapping Magisteria.Stephen Jay Gould - 1997 - Natural History 106 (2):16--22.
    ncongruous places often inspire anomalous stories. In early 1984, I spent several nights at the Vatican housed in a hotel built for itinerant priests. While pondering over such puzzling issues as the intended function of the bidets in each bathroom, and hungering for something other than plum jam on my breakfast rolls (why did the basket only contain hundreds of identical plum packets and not a one of, say, strawberry?), I encountered yet another among the innumerable issues of contrasting cultures (...)
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  • Social Epistemology.Steve Fuller - 1990 - Erkenntnis 33 (1):131-135.
     
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  • Darwin's Nemesis: Phillip Johnson and the Intelligent Design Movement.W. A. Dembski - 2008 - Hts Theological Studies 64 (3):1556-1558.