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  1. Analyzing Oppression.Ann E. Cudd - 2006 - Oup Usa.
    Analyzing Oppression asks: why is oppression often sustained over many generations? The book explains how oppression coercively co-opts the oppressed to join their own oppression and argues that all persons have a moral responsibility to resist it. It finally explores the possibility of freedom in a world actively opposing oppression.
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  • Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity.Sunera Thobani - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):221-224.
  • The Value of Hope.Luc Bovens - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):667-681.
    Hope obeys Aristotle's doctrine of the mean: one should neither hope too much, nor too little. But what determines what constitutes too much and what constitutes too little for a particular person at a particular time? The sceptic presents an argument to the effect that it is never rational to hope. An attempt to answer the sceptic leads us in different directions. Decision-theoretic and preference-theoretic arguments support the instrumental value of hope. An investigation into the nature of hope permits us (...)
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  • A Perceptual Theory of Hope.Michael Milona & Katie Stockdale - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    This paper addresses the question of what the attitude of hope consists in. We argue that shortcomings in recent theories of hope have methodological roots in that they proceed with little regard for the rich body of literature on the emotions. Taking insights from work in the philosophy of emotions, we argue that hope involves a kind of normative perception. We then develop a strategy for determining the content of this perception, arguing that hope is a perception of practical reasons. (...)
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  • Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self.Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays explores the social and relational dimensions of individual autonomy. Rejecting the feminist charge that autonomy is inherently masculinist, the contributors draw on feminist critiques of autonomy to challenge and enrich contemporary philosophical debates about agency, identity, and moral responsibility. The essays analyze the complex ways in which oppression can impair an agent's capacity for autonomy, and investigate connections, neglected by standard accounts, between autonomy and other aspects of the agent, including self-conception, self-worth, memory, and the (...)
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  • Justice and the Politics of Difference.Debra A. DeBruin - 1993 - Ethics 103 (2):398-400.
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  • Trust, Hope and Empowerment.Victoria McGeer - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):237 – 254.
    Philosophers and social scientists have focussed a great deal of attention on our human capacity to trust, but relatively little on the capacity to hope. This is a significant oversight, as hope and trust are importantly interconnected. This paper argues that, even though trust can and does feed our hopes, it is our empowering capacity to hope that significantly underwrites—and makes rational—our capacity to trust.
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  • Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self.Sue Campbell - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):165-168.
  • Review: Oppression and Resistance: Frye's Politics of Reality. [REVIEW]Claudia Card - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):149-166.
    Marilyn Frye's first book, The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory, presents nine philosophical lectures: four on women's subordination, four on resistance and rebellion, one on revolution. Its approach combines a lesbian perspective with analytical philosophy of language. The major contributions of the book are its analysis of oppression, highly suggestive discussions of the roles of attention in knowledge and ignorance and in arrogance and love, a defense of political separatism not based on female supremacism, and a development of (...)
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  • Wishing and Hoping.J. M. O. Wheatley - 1957 - Analysis 18 (6):121 - 131.
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  • Losing One's Self.Cheshire Calhoun - 2008 - In Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.), Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.
    What is it that enables agents to find the business of reflective endorsement, deliberation, and willing meaningful? I argue that our having motivating reasons to act-and thus reason to lead a life-depends on a set of background "frames" of agency being in place. These "frames" are attitudes toward and beliefs about our own agency that, under normal conditions, are simply taken for granted as we lead our lives as agents and that thus do not enter into our normative reflection, deliberation, (...)
     
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  • Oppression.Marilyn Frye - 2000 - In Lorraine Code (ed.), Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. London & New York: Routledge. pp. 370.
  • Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.Kimberle Crenshaw - 1989 - The University of Chicago Legal Forum 140:139-167.
  • Hope and Exploitation.Adrienne Martin - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):49-55.
    How do we encourage patients to be hopeful without exploiting their hope? A medical researcher or a pharmaceutical company can take unfair advantage of someone's hope by much subtler means than simply giving misinformation. Hope shapes deliberation, and therefore can make deliberation better or worse, by the deliberator's own standards of deliberation.
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  • How We Hope: A Moral Psychology.Krista K. Thomason - 2018 - The European Legacy 24 (1):114-116.
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  • Five Faces of Oppression.Iris Marion Young - 2009 - In George L. Henderson & Marvin Waterstone (eds.), Geographic Thought: A Praxis Perspective. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 55-71.
  • Five Faces of Oppression.Iris M. Young - 1988 - Philosophical Forum 19 (4):270.
     
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  • [H. Marion].[author unknown] - 1896 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 41:576-576.
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  • The Art of Good Hope.Victoria McGeer - 2004 - Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1):100--127.
    What is hope? Though variously characterized as a cognitive attitude, an emotion, a disposition, and even a process or activity, hope, more deeply, a unifying and grounding force of human agency. We cannot live a human life without hope, therefore questions about the rationality of hope are properly recast as questions about what it means to hope well. This thesis is defended and elaborated as follows. First, it is argued that hope is an essential and distinctive feature of human agency, (...)
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  • Hope and its Place in Mind.Phillip Pettit - 2004 - Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (1):152--165.
    People may have open minds on whether a life-extending drug or technology is going to be developed before their sixties and may strongly desire that development. Do they therefore hope that it occurs? Do they hope for it in the substantive sense of “pinning their hopes” on the development? No, they do not. Hoping for a prospect in that sense certainly presupposes having an open mind on whether it will occur and having a desire for its occurrence. But, more crucially, (...)
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