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  1. Early Analytic Philosophy: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein.Øystein Linnebo - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):98-101.
    Analytic philosophy has traditionally been little concerned with the history of philosophy, including that of analytic philosophy itself. But in recent years the study of the early period of the analytic tradition has become an active and lively branch of Anglo-American philosophy. Early Analytic Philosophy, a collection of papers presented in honor of professor Leonard Linsky at the University of Chicago in April 1992, is an example of this. The contributors, many of them leading scholars in the field of early (...)
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  • Early Analytic Philosophy: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein : Essays in Honor of Leonard Linsky.William W. Tait (ed.) - 1996 - Open Court.
    These essays present new analyses of the central figures of analytic philosophy -- Frege, Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, and Carnap -- from the beginnings of the analytic movement into the 1930s. The papers do not reflect a single perspective, but rather express divergent interpretations of this controversial intellectual milieu.
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  • Grundgesetze der Arithmetik: Begriffsschriftlich Abgeleitet.Gottlob Frege - 1962 - G. Olms.
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  • A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.John P. Burgess & Gideon Rosen - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Numbers and other mathematical objects are exceptional in having no locations in space or time or relations of cause and effect. This makes it difficult to account for the possibility of the knowledge of such objects, leading many philosophers to embrace nominalism, the doctrine that there are no such objects, and to embark on ambitious projects for interpreting mathematics so as to preserve the subject while eliminating its objects. This book cuts through a host of technicalities that have obscured previous (...)
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  • What is Mathematics, Really?Reuben Hersh - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Platonism is the most pervasive philosophy of mathematics. Indeed, it can be argued that an inarticulate, half-conscious Platonism is nearly universal among mathematicians. The basic idea is that mathematical entities exist outside space and time, outside thought and matter, in an abstract realm. In the more eloquent words of Edward Everett, a distinguished nineteenth-century American scholar, "in pure mathematics we contemplate absolute truths which existed in the divine mind before the morning stars sang together, and which will continue to exist (...)
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  • Proof and Knowledge in Mathematics.Michael Detlefsen (ed.) - 1992 - Routledge.
    These questions arise from any attempt to discover an epistemology for mathematics. This collection of essays considers various questions concerning the nature of justification in mathematics and possible sources of that justification. Among these are the question of whether mathematical justification is _a priori_ or _a posteriori_ in character, whether logical and mathematical differ, and if formalization plays a significant role in mathematical justification.
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  • Proof and Knowledge in Mathematics.Janet Folina - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (182):125-127.
  • What Numbers Could Not Be.Paul Benacerraf - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (1):47-73.
  • A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.Bob Hale - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):161-167.
  • Frege on Knowing the Third Realm.Tyler Burge - 1992 - Mind 101 (404):633-650.
  • A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.Thomas Hofweber - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):723-727.
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  • Against Intuitionism: Constructive Mathematics is Part of Classical Mathematics. [REVIEW]W. W. Tait - 1983 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 12 (2):173 - 195.
  • Does Mathematics Need New Axioms.Solomon Feferman, Harvey M. Friedman, Penelope Maddy & John R. Steel - 1999 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 6 (4):401-446.
    Part of the ambiguity lies in the various points of view from which this question might be considered. The crudest di erence lies between the point of view of the working mathematician and that of the logician concerned with the foundations of mathematics. Now some of my fellow mathematical logicians might protest this distinction, since they consider themselves to be just more of those \working mathematicians". Certainly, modern logic has established itself as a very respectable branch of mathematics, and there (...)
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  • Proof and Knowledge in Mathematics.Michael Detlefsen - 1995 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 185 (1):133-134.
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  • Philosophy of mathematics, selected readings.Paul Benacerraf & Hilary Putnam - 1966 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 156:501-502.
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  • Truth and Other Enigmas.Michael Dummett - 1980 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 170 (1):62-65.
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  • A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.John P. Burgess & Gideon Rosen - 2001 - Studia Logica 67 (1):146-149.
     
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  • Truth and Other Enigmas.Michael Dummett - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (122):47-67.
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  • A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.John Burgess & Gideon Rosen - 2000 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):124-126.
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  • Frege Versus Cantor and Dedekind: On the Concept of Number.William Tait - manuscript
    There can be no doubt about the value of Frege's contributions to the philosophy of mathematics. First, he invented quantification theory and this was the first step toward making precise the notion of a purely logical deduction. Secondly, he was the first to publish a logical analysis of the ancestral R* of a relation R, which yields a definition of R* in second-order logic.1 Only a narrow and arid conception of philosophy would exclude these two achievements. Thirdly and very importantly, (...)
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