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  1. Working Knowledges Before and After Circa 1800: Practices and Disciplines in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine.John V. Pickstone - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):489-516.
    Historians of science, inasmuch as they are concerned with knowledges and practices rather than institutions, have tended of late to focus on case studies of common processes such as experiment and publication. In so doing, they tend to treat science as a single category, with various local instantiations. Or, alternatively, they relate cases to their specific local contexts. In neither approach do the cases or their contexts build easily into broader histories, reconstructing changing knowledge practices across time and space. This (...)
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  • Representing and Intervening.Adam Morton - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (4):606-611.
  • Collecting, Comparing, and Computing Sequences: The Making of Margaret O. Dayhoff’s Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure, 1954–1965.Bruno J. Strasser - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (4):623-660.
    Collecting, comparing, and computing molecular sequences are among the most prevalent practices in contemporary biological research. They represent a specific way of producing knowledge. This paper explores the historical development of these practices, focusing on the work of Margaret O. Dayhoff, Richard V. Eck, and Robert S. Ledley, who produced the first computer-based collection of protein sequences, published in book format in 1965 as the Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure. While these practices are generally associated with the rise of (...)
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  • Collecting, Comparing, and Computing Sequences: The Making of Margaret O. Dayhoff’s Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure, 1954–1965. [REVIEW]Bruno J. Strasser - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (4):623 - 660.
    Collecting, comparing, and computing molecular sequences are among the most prevalent practices in contemporary biological research. They represent a specific way of producing knowledge. This paper explores the historical development of these practices, focusing on the work of Margaret O. Dayhoff, Richard V. Eck, and Robert S. Ledley, who produced the first computer-based collection of protein sequences, published in book format in 1965 as the Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure. While these practices are generally associated with the rise of (...)
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  • Working Knowledges Before and After Circa 1800.John V. Pickstone - 2007 - Isis 98 (3):489-516.
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  • Satellite-DNA: A Case-Study for the Evolution of Experimental Techniques.Edna Suárez - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (1):31-57.
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  • Satellite-DNA: A Case-Study for the Evolution of Experimental Techniques.Edna Suárez - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (1):31-57.
    The paper tries to show that an evolutionary perspective helps us to address what is called the adaptation problem, that is, the remarkable coherence, and seemingly successful design, existing between our cognitive tools and the phenomena of the material world. It argues that a fine-grained description of the structure and function of experimental techniques—as a special type amongst evolving scientific practices—is a condition for a better understanding and, ultimately, an explanation of how adaptation among the heterogeneous elements of experimental knowledge (...)
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  • Toward a History of Epistemic Things: Synthesizing Proteins in a Test Tube.[author unknown] - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):563-565.
     
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  • Documenting the Emergence of Bio-Ontologies: Or, Why Researching Bioinformatics Requires HPSSB.Sabina Leonelli - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1).
  • Spurenlesen im Experimentalsystem.Hans-Jörg Rheinberger - 2007 - In Sybille Krämer, Werner Kogge & Gernot Grube (eds.), Spur: Spurenlesen Als Orientierungstechnik Und Wissenskunst. Suhrkamp. pp. 293--308.
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