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  1. Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1953 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  • In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism.Stanley CAVELL - 1988 - University of Chicago Press.
    These lectures by one of the most influential and original philosophers of the twentieth century constitute a sustained argument for the philosophical basis of romanticism, particularly in its American rendering. Through his examination of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Wordsworth, and Coleridge, Stanley Cavell shows that romanticism and American transcendentalism represent a serious philosophical response to the challenge of skepticism that underlies the writings of Wittgenstein and Austin on ordinary language.
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  • The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy.Stanley Cavell - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This reissue of an American philosophical classic includes a new preface by Cavell, in which he discusses the work's reception and influence. The work fosters a fascinating relationship between philosophy and literature both by augmenting his philosophical discussions with examples from literature and by applying philosophical theories to literary texts. Cavell also succeeds in drawing some very important parallels between the British analytic tradition and the continental tradition, by comparing skepticism as understood in Descartes, Hume, and Kant with philosophy of (...)
  • The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy.Stanley Cavell - 1979 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This handsome new edition of Stanley Cavell's landmark text, first published 20 years ago, provides a new preface that discusses the reception and influence of his work, which occupies a unique niche between philosophy and literary studies.
     
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  • Must We Mean What We Say?Stanley Cavell - 1958 - In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Inquiry. New York: Dover Publications. pp. 172 – 212.
  • Postmodernism and the Education of the Whole Person.Paul Standish - 1995 - Philosophy of Education 29 (1):121-135.
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  • In Her Own Voice: Convention, Conversion, Criteria.Paul Standish - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):91–106.
  • Professional Codes of Practice and Ethical Conduct.Angus James Dawson - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):145-153.
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  • The Individualized Society.Zygmunt Bauman - 2001
  • Crossing Borders Within: Stanley Cavell and the Politics of Interpretation.Naoko Saito & Paul Standish - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (4):419-433.
  • Postmodernism and the Education of the Whole Person.Paul Standish - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):121–135.
  • Philosophy the Day after Tomorrow.Stanley Cavell - 2006 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (2):400-401.
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  • Must We Mean What We Say?S. CAVELL - 1969
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  • Disowning Knowledge in Seven Plays of Shakespeare.Stanley Cavell - 2003
     
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  • Stanley Cavell: Skepticism, Subjectivity, and the Ordinary.Espen Hammer - 2002 - Polity.
    Stanley Cavell is a leading figure in American philosophy and one of the most exhilarating and wide-ranging intellectuals of our time. In this book Espen Hammer offers a lucid and thorough account of the development of Cavell's work, from his early writings on ordinary language philosophy and skepticism to his most recent contributions to film studies, literary theory, romanticism, ethics, and politics. The book traces the many lines of skepticism occurring in Cavell's work and shows how they amount to a (...)
     
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  • Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome the Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism.Stanley Cavell - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two traditions of English and German philosophy shun one another; where the cultures of America and Europe unsettle one another.
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  • The Cavell Reader.Stephen Mulhall (ed.) - 1996 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Philosophy the Day After Tomorrow.Stanley Cavell - 2005 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    Something out of the ordinary -- The interminable Shakespearean text -- Fred Astaire asserts the right to praise -- Henry James returns to America and to Shakespeare -- Philosophy the day after tomorrow -- What is the scandal of skepticism? -- Performative and passionate utterance -- The Wittgensteinian event -- Thoreau thinks of ponds, Heidegger of rivers -- The world as things.
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  • The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson.Naoko Saito - 2005 - Fordham University Press.
    In the name of efficiency, the practice of education has come to be dominated by neoliberal ideology and procedures of standardization and quantification. Such attempts to make all aspects of practice transparent and subject to systematic accounting lack sensitivity to the invisible and the silent, to something in the human condition that cannot readily be expressed in an either-or form. Seeking alternatives to such trends, Saito reads Dewey’s idea of progressive education through the lens of Emersonian moral perfectionism (to borrow (...)
  • Education in an Age of Nihilism.Nigel Blake (ed.) - 2000 - Routledge/Falmer.
    This timely book addresses concerns about educational and moral standards in a world characterised by a growing nihilism.
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