Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. A Perfect Moral Storm: The Ethical Tragedy of Climate Change.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    Climate change is a global problem that is predominantly an intergenerational conflict, and which takes place in a setting where our ethical impulses are weak. This "perfect moral storm" poses a profound challenge to humanity. This book explains how the "perfect storm" metaphor makes sense of our current malaise, and why a better ethics can help see our way out.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • A Perfect Moral Storm: Climate Change, Intergenerational Ethics and the Problem of Moral Corruption.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):397 - 413.
    The peculiar features of the climate change problem pose substantial obstacles to our ability to make the hard choices necessary to address it. Climate change involves the convergence of a set of global, intergenerational and theoretical problems. This convergence justifies calling it a 'perfect moral storm'. One consequence of this storm is that, even if the other difficult ethical questions surrounding climate change could be answered, we might still find it difficult to act. For the storm makes us extremely vulnerable (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  • The Foundations of Bioethics.H. Tristram Engelhardt - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    The book challenges the values of much of contemporary bioethics and health care policy by confronting their failure to secure the moral norms they seek to apply.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  • Practical Ethics.Peter Singer - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    For thirty years, Peter Singer's Practical Ethics has been the classic introduction to applied ethics. For this third edition, the author has revised and updated all the chapters and added a new chapter addressing climate change, one of the most important ethical challenges of our generation. Some of the questions discussed in this book concern our daily lives. Is it ethical to buy luxuries when others do not have enough to eat? Should we buy meat from intensively reared animals? Am (...)
  • After Virtue.A. MACINTYRE - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 46 (1):169-171.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   957 citations  
  • Experts: Which Ones Should You Trust?Alvin I. Goldman - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):85-110.
    Mainstream epistemology is a highly theoretical and abstract enterprise. Traditional epistemologists rarely present their deliberations as critical to the practical problems of life, unless one supposes—as Hume, for example, did not—that skeptical worries should trouble us in our everyday affairs. But some issues in epistemology are both theoretically interesting and practically quite pressing. That holds of the problem to be discussed here: how laypersons should evaluate the testimony of experts and decide which of two or more rival experts is most (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   121 citations  
  • Justice as Fairness: A Restatement.John Rawls - 2001 - Harvard University Press.
    This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s.
  • Against Method.Paul Feyerabend - 1975 - London: New Left Books.
  • Climate Ethics: Essential Readings.Stephen M. Gardiner, Simon Caney, Dale Jamieson & Henry Shue - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    This collection gathers a set of central papers from the emerging area of ethics and climate change.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing.Miranda Fricker - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Fricker shows that virtue epistemology provides a general epistemological idiom in which these issues can be forcefully discussed.
  • Scientific Knowledge Suppresses but Does Not Supplant Earlier Intuitions.Andrew Shtulman & Joshua Valcarcel - 2012 - Cognition 124 (2):209-215.
  • Democracy and Moral Conflict.Robert B. Talisse - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why democracy? Most often this question is met with an appeal to some decidedly moral value, such as equality, liberty, dignity or even peace. But in contemporary democratic societies, there is deep disagreement and conflict about the precise nature and relative worth of these values. And when democracy votes, some of those who lose will see the prevailing outcome as not merely disappointing, but morally intolerable. How should citizens react when confronted with a democratic result that they regard as intolerable? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations.Robert King Merton - 1973 - University of Chicago Press.
  • Moral Agnosticism: An Ethics of Inquiry and Public Discourse.Lawerence Torcello - 2014 - Teaching Ethics 14 (2):3-16.
    Taking Anthropogenic global warming as its framing example this paper develops an ethics of inquiry and public discourse influenced by Rawlsian public reason. The need to embrace scientific fact during civil discourse on topics of moral and political controversy is stressed as an ethical mandate. The paper argues: (1) ethicists have a moral obligation to recognize scientific consensus when relevant to ethical discussions. (2) The failure to condemn science denialism when it interferes with the public’s understanding of ethical issues is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • One World: The Ethics of Globalization.Peter Singer - 2002 - Yale University Press.
    In a new preface, Peter Singer discusses the prospects for the ethical approach he advocates."--BOOK JACKET.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  • Moral Realism as Moral Motivation: The Impact of Meta-Ethics on Everyday Decision-Making.Liane Young & A. J. Durwin - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 49 (2):302-306.
    People disagree about whether “moral facts” are objective facts like mathematical truths (moral realism) or simply products of the human mind (moral antirealism). What is the impact of different meta-ethical views on actual behavior? In Experiment 1, a street canvasser, soliciting donations for a charitable organization dedicated to helping impoverished children, primed passersby with realism or antirealism. Participants primed with realism were twice as likely to be donors, compared to control participants and participants primed with antirealism. In Experiment 2, online (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Public Reception of Climate Science: Coherence, Reliability, and Independence.Ulrike Hahn, Adam J. L. Harris & Adam Corner - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):180-195.
    Possible measures to mitigate climate change require global collective actions whose impacts will be felt by many, if not all. Implementing such actions requires successful communication of the reasons for them, and hence the underlying climate science, to a degree that far exceeds typical scientific issues which do not require large-scale societal response. Empirical studies have identified factors, such as the perceived level of consensus in scientific opinion and the perceived reliability of scientists, that can limit people's trust in science (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Epistemic Justice as a Virtue of Social Institutions.Elizabeth Anderson - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (2):163-173.
    In Epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker makes a tremendous contribution to theorizing the intersection of social epistemology with theories of justice. Theories of justice often take as their object of assessment either interpersonal transactions (specific exchanges between persons) or particular institutions. They may also take a more comprehensive perspective in assessing systems of institutions. This systemic perspective may enable control of the cumulative effects of millions of individual transactions that cannot be controlled at the individual or institutional levels. This is true (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • An Argument for Holism.Ned Block - 1994 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:151-70.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Conceptual Role Semantics.Ned Block - 1998 - In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 242-256.
    According to Conceptual Role Semantics, the meaning of a representation is the role of that representation in the cognitive life of the agent, e.g. in perception, thought and decision-making. It is an extension of the well known "use" theory of meaning, according to which the meaning of a word is its use in communication and more generally, in social interaction. CRS supplements external use by including the role of a symbol inside a computer or a brain. The uses appealed to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Doing Good Leads to More Good: The Reinforcing Power of a Moral Self-Concept.Liane Young, Alek Chakroff & Jessica Tom - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):325-334.
    What is the role of self-concept in motivating moral behavior? On one account, when people are primed to perceive themselves as “do-gooders”, conscious access to this positive self-concept will reinforce good behavior. On an alternative account, when people are reminded that they have done their “good deed for the day”, they will feel licensed to behave worse. In the current study, when participants were asked to recall their own good deeds (positive self-concept), their subsequent charitable donations were nearly twice that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Descartes: An Analytical and Historical Introduction.Georges Dicker - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    A solid grasp of the main themes and arguments of the seventeenth century philosopher Rene Descartes is an essential tool towards understanding modern thought, and a necessary entree to the work of the empiricists and Immanuel Kant, and to the study of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of mind. Clear and accessible, this book serves as an introduction to Descartes's ideas for undergraduates and as a sophisticated companion to his Meditations for more advanced readers. After a thorough discussion of the main (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle Against Climate Change Failed -- And What It Means for Our Future.Dale Jamieson - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    From the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to the 2009 Copenhagen Climate Conference there was a concerted international effort to stop climate change. This book is about what climate change is, why we failed to stop it, and why it still matters what we do.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Agnotology: The Making and Unmaking of Ignorance.Robert N. Proctor & Londa Schiebinger (eds.) - 2008 - Stanford University Press Stanford, California.
  • Pluralism and Liberal Politics.Robert Talisse - 2011 - Routledge.
    In this book, Robert Talisse critically examines the moral and political implications of pluralism, the view that our best moral thinking is indeterminate and that moral conflict is an inescapable feature of the human condition. Through a careful engagement with the work of William James, Isaiah Berlin, John Rawls, and their contemporary followers, Talisse distinguishes two broad types of moral pluralism: metaphysical and epistemic. After arguing that metaphysical pluralism does not offer a compelling account of value and thus cannot ground (...)
  • Sceptical Essays.Bertrand Russell - 1928 - Routledge.
    'These propositions may seem mild, yet, if accepted, they would absolutely revolutionize human life.' With these words Bertrand Russell introduces what is indeed a revolutionary book. Taking as his starting-point the irrationality of the world, he offers by contrast something 'wildly paradoxical and subversive' Sceptical Essays has never been out of print since its first publication in 1928. Today, besieged as we are by the numbing onslaught of twenty-first-century capitalism, Russell's defense of scepticism and independence of mind is as timely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Ethics of Inquiry and Engagement: The Case of Science in Public.Scott Aikin & Michael Harbour - 2010 - Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (2):155-168.
    There has been a promising discussion brewing recently about whether there is an ethics of inquiry—that is, a unique set of ethical rules that constrains inquirers specifically in their role as inquirers. Most prominently, Philip Kitcher has proposed that there is indeed an ethics of inquiry. He argues that, given the intellectual climate of many modern societies, certain research programs are likely to encourage further social injustice against members of already disadvantaged groups; in such cases, inquirers are obligated to refrain (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Science, Truth, and Democracy.Philip Kitcher - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Striving to boldly redirect the philosophy of science, this book by renowned philosopher Philip Kitcher examines the heated debate surrounding the role of science in shaping our lives. Kitcher explores the sharp divide between those who believe that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary--the purists--and those who believe that it invariably serves the interests of people in positions of power. In a daring turn, he rejects both perspectives, working out a more realistic image of the sciences--one (...)
  • Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem.Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.) - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    What sets the practice of rigorously tested, sound science apart from pseudoscience? In this volume, the contributors seek to answer this question, known to philosophers of science as “the demarcation problem.” This issue has a long history in philosophy, stretching as far back as the early twentieth century and the work of Karl Popper. But by the late 1980s, scholars in the field began to treat the demarcation problem as impossible to solve and futile to ponder. However, the essays that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues From Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.Naomi Oreskes & Erik M. Conway - 2010 - Bloomsbury Press.
    The U.S. scientific community has long led the world in research on such areas as public health, environmental science, and issues affecting quality of life. These scientists have produced landmark studies on the dangers of DDT, tobacco smoke, acid rain, and global warming. But at the same time, a small yet potent subset of this community leads the world in vehement denial of these dangers. -/- Merchants of Doubt tells the story of how a loose-knit group of high-level scientists and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  • Is the State Endorsement of Any Marriage Justifiable? Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions, and the Marriage Privatization Model.Lawrence Torcello - 2008 - Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (1):43-61.
  • Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science From Bunk.Massimo Pigliucci - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction : science versus pseudoscience and the "demarcation problem" -- Hard science, soft science -- Almost science -- Pseudoscience -- Blame the media? -- Debates on science : the rise of think tanks and the decline of public intellectuals -- Science and politics : the case of global warming -- Science in the courtroom : the case against intelligent design -- From superstition to natural philosophy -- From natural philosophy to modern science -- The science wars I : do we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • The Ethics of Belief and Other Essays.William Kingdon Clifford - 1947 - Prometheus Books.
  • An Introduction to Logic.Morris Raphael Cohen - 1962 - New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.
    Written for independent study and suitable for an introductory course in logic, this classic text combines a sound presentation of logic with effective pedagogy ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Casualties as a Moral Measure of Climate Change.John Nolt - 2015 - Climatic Change 130 (3):347–358.
    Climate change will cause large numbers of casualties, perhaps extending over thousands of years. Casualties have a clear moral significance that economic and other technical measures of harm tend to mask. They are, moreover, universally understood, whereas other measures of harm are not. Therefore, the harms of climate change should regularly be expressed in terms of casualties by such agencies such as IPCC’s Working Group III, in addition to whatever other measures are used. Casualty estimates should, furthermore, be used to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • [Book Review] the Theory of Communicative Action. [REVIEW]Jurgen Habermas - 1990 - Ethics 100 (3):641-657.
  • Whose Justice? Which Rationality?Alasdair MacIntyre - 1988 - University of Notre Dame Press.
  • Informal Logic a Handbook for Critical Argumentation.David N. Walton - 1989
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  • Climate Change Justice.Eric A. Posner & David Weisbach - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Climate change and justice are so closely associated that many people take it for granted that a global climate treaty should--indeed, must--directly address both issues together. But, in fact, this would be a serious mistake, one that, by dooming effective international limits on greenhouse gases, would actually make the world's poor and developing nations far worse off. This is the provocative and original argument of Climate Change Justice. Eric Posner and David Weisbach strongly favor both a climate change agreement and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Can Theories Be Refuted? Essays on the Duhem-Quine Thesis.Sandra G. Harding - 1976 - Reidel.
  • Political Liberalism.J. Rawls - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (3):596-598.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1160 citations  
  • Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement.Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse - 2013 - Routledge.
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement presents an accessible and engaging introduction to the theory of argument, with special emphasis on the way argument works in public political debate. The authors develop a view according to which proper argument is necessary for one’s individual cognitive health; this insight is then expanded to the collective health of one’s society. Proper argumentation, then, is seen to play a central role in a well-functioning democracy. Written in a lively style and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Ethics of Inquiry, Scientific Belief, and Public Discourse.Lawrence Torcello - 2011 - Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (3):197-215.
    The scientific consensus regarding anthropogenic climate change is firmly established yet climate change denialism, a species of what I call pseudoskepticism, is on the rise in industrial nations most responsible for climate change. Such denialism suggests the need for a robust ethics of inquiry and public discourse. In this paper I argue: (1) that ethical obligations of inquiry extend to every voting citizen insofar as citizens are bound together as a political body. (2) It is morally condemnable for public officials (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age.Theodore Schick - 2010 - Mcgraw-Hill.
  • The Trouble with Pseudoskepticism.Lawrence Torcello - 2012 - Skeptical Inquirer 36 (3).
    The continuing rejection of anthropogenic global warming by non-experts despite overwhelming scientific consensus is rationally untenable and best described as “pseudoskeptical;” it is akin to AIDS denialism, the advocacy of intelligent design, and anti-vaccination movements.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Exposure and Affect: Overview and Meta-Analysis of Research 1968-1987.Robert F. Bornstein - 1989 - Psychological Bulletin 106:265-89.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations