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Truth and Moral Responsibility

In Fabio Bacchini Massimo Dell'Utri & Stefano Caputo (eds.), New Advances in Causation, Agency, and Moral Responsibility. Cambridge Scholars Press (forthcoming)

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  1. Farewell to the Direct Argument.David Widerker - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (6):316.
  • Determinism and Moral Responsiblity Are Incompatible.Ted A. Warfield - 1996 - Philosophical Topics 24 (2):215-26.
  • An Essay on Free Will.Peter Van Inwagen - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    "This is an important book, and no one interested in issues which touch on the free will will want to ignore it."--Ethics. In this stimulating and thought-provoking book, the author defends the thesis that free will is incompatible with determinism. He disputes the view that determinism is necessary for moral responsbility. Finding no good reason for accepting determinism, but believing moral responsiblity to be indubitable, he concludes that determinism should be rejected.
  • An Essay on Free Will.Michael Slote - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):327-330.
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  • Transfer Principles and Moral Responsibility.Eleonore Stump & John Martin Fischer - 2000 - Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):47-56.
  • Transfer Principles and Moral Responsibility.Eleonore Stump & John Martin Fischer - 2000 - Noûs 34 (s14):47-55.
  • Semi-Compatibilism and the Transfer of Non-Responsibility.Mark Ravizza - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 75 (1-2):61-93.
  • Saying Good-Bye to the Direct Argument the Right Way.Michael McKenna - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (3):349-383.
    Peter van Inwagen contends that nonresponsibility transfers across deterministic relations. Suppose it does. If the facts of the past and the laws of nature entail every truth about what one does, and no one is even in part morally responsible for the past and the laws, then no one is even in part morally responsible for what one does. This argument, the Direct Argument, has drawn various critics, who have attempted to produce counterexamples to its core inference principle. This article (...)
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  • Responsibility for Necessities.Stephen Kearns - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 155 (2):307-324.
    It is commonly held that no one can be morally responsible for a necessary truth. In this paper, I will provide various examples that cast doubt on this idea. I also show that one popular argument for the incompatibility of moral responsibility and determinism (van Inwagen’s Direct Argument) fails given my examples.
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Peter van Inwagen - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    Discusses the incompatibility of the concepts of free will and determinism and argues that moral responsibility needs the doctrine of free will.
  • Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility.John Martin Fischer - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):459-466.
  • Free Will and the Necessity of the Past.Joseph Keim Campbell - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):105-111.
  • Free Will and the Necessity of the Past.J. K. Campbell - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):105-111.
  • ``Losing Track of the Sceptic&Quot.Anthony Brueckner - 1985 - Analysis 45 (1):103--104.
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  • Determinism and Moral Responsibility Are Incompatible.Ted Warfield - 1996 - Philosophical Topics 24 (2):215-226.
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  • Saying Good-Bye to the Direct Argument the Right Way.Michael McKenna - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (3):349-383.
    Peter van Inwagen contends that nonresponsibility transfers across deterministic relations. Suppose it does. If the facts of the past and the laws of nature entail every truth about what one does, and no one is even in part morally responsible for the past and the laws, then no one is even in part morally responsible for what one does. This argument, the Direct Argument, has drawn various critics, who have attempted to produce counterexamples to its core inference principle. This article (...)
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  • Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility.John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a comprehensive, systematic theory of moral responsibility. The authors explore the conditions under which individuals are morally responsible for actions, omissions, consequences, and emotions. The leading idea in the book is that moral responsibility is based on 'guidance control'. This control has two components: the mechanism that issues in the relevant behavior must be the agent's own mechanism, and it must be appropriately responsive to reasons. The book develops an account of both components. The authors go on (...)
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  • The Direct Argument for Incompatibilism.David Widerker & Ira M. Schnall - 2014 - In David Palmer (ed.), David Palmer (ed.) Libertarian Free Will, Oxford University Press, 2014, pp. 88-106. Oxford University Press. pp. 88-106.
    Peter van Inwagen's Direct Argument (DA) purports to establish the incompatibility of determinism and moral responsibility, without appealing to the notion of avoidability, a notion on whose analysis compatibilists and incompatibilists disagree. Van Inwagen intended DA to refute compatibilism, or at least to shift the burden of proof onto the compatibilist. In this paper, we offer a critical assessment of DA. We examine a variety of objections to DA due to John Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Ishtiyaque Haji, Seth Shabo, Michael (...)
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  • Feminism After Bourdieu. By Lisa Adkins and Beverley Skeggs, Editors. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. Pp. Vii, 258. Truth Eternal and the Adversity of Diversity Law: A Simple Philosophy of Truth. By Abram Allen. Lanham, Md.: Hamilton Books, 2005. Pp. Xxii, 323. Human Life, Action and Ethics: Essays by GEM Anscombe. St. Andrews Studies. [REVIEW]Deflationary Truth & Aurel Kolnai - 2005 - Philosophical Review 114 (4).
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