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  1. The Interpretation of Music: Philosophical Essays.Michael Krausz (ed.) - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume looks at the symbiotic relationship between the philosophical inquiry into the presuppositions of musical interpretation and the interpretation of particular musical works by musicians. Characteristically, interpreters of music entertain philosophical views about musical interpretation. For example, an interpreter's decision whether to play one or another version of a piece, whether to use one instrument or another, whether to emphasize certain elements, depends in part upon certain convictions of a philosophical nature. An interpreter's resolution of such questions will involve (...)
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  • Plato and the Mass Media.Alexander Nehamas - 1988 - The Monist 71 (2):214-234.
  • Love's Knowledge.Richard Eldridge - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (2):485-488.
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  • The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.Paul B. Woodruff - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):205-210.
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  • Music, Art, and Metaphysics.Stephen Davies - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 26 (2):110.
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  • Seeing and Believing: Metaphor, Image, and Force.Richard Moran - 1989 - Critical Inquiry 16 (1):87-112.
    One way in which the characteristic gestures of philosophy and criticism differ from each other lies in their involvements with disillusionment, with the undoing of our naivete, especially regarding what we take ourselves to know about the meaning of what we say. Philosophy will often find less than we thought was there, perhaps nothing at all, in what we say about the “external” world, or in our judgments of value, or in our ordinary psychological talk. The work of criticism, on (...)
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  • Music, Imagination and Culture.Peter Kivy - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (1):76-79.
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  • Paraesthetics: Foucault, Lyotard, Derrida.David H. Fisher - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (3):256-258.
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  • Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective.Noel Carroll - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):297-300.
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  • The Philosophical Disenfranchisement of Art.Guy Sircello - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (2):268.
  • The Rule of Metaphor. Multi-Disciplinary Studies of the Creation of Meaning in Language.J. J. A. Mooij - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (4):496-498.
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  • Rightness and Reasons: Interpretation in Cultural Practices.Thomas Leddy - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (2):222-225.
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  • The Test of Time: An Essay in Philosophical Aesthetics.Catherine Lord - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 17 (3):112.
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  • Zettel.J. E. Llewelyn - 1967 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (71):176-177.
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  • The Nature of Fiction.Susan L. Feagin - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):948.
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  • Works and Worlds of Art.George Dickie - 1983 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (2):279-281.
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  • The Aesthetics of Architecture.Flint Schier - 1983 - Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):100-103.
  • Art as Experience.I. E. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (10):275-276.
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  • Beauty Restored.Francis Sparshott - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (3):461.
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  • Tolstoy's "What Is Art?".Alan Simpson - 1988 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 22 (2):116.
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  • Sound and Symbol: Music and the External World.Charles E. Gauss - 1956 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (2):286-287.
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art Criticism. By Manuel Bilsky.Manuel Bilsky - 1960 - Ethics 71 (2):143-144.
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  • The Art Circle.Jeffrey Wieand - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (1):80-82.
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  • Figurative Speech and Figurative Acts.Ted Cohen - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (19):669-684.
  • The Semantic Definition of Literature.Colin A. Lyas - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (3):81-95.
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  • Is There a Problem of Indiscernible Counterparts?John Andrew Fisher - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (9):467-484.
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  • Hegel on the Future of Art.Karsten Harries - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):677 - 696.
    MANY, PERHAPS MOST OF US, tend to connect art with the past. Faced with the art of our own time we become unsure: everything important seems to have been done, the vocabulary of art exhausted, and attempts to develop new vocabularies more interesting than convincing. Ours tends to be an autumnal view of art. The association of art and museum has come to replace such older associations as art and church, or art and palace. As we know it, the museum (...)
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  • Film Theory and Philosophy. [REVIEW]Cynthia A. Freeland, Richard Allen & Murray Smith - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):144-7.
    This substantial book presents essays by nineteen authors exploring intersections between film theory and philosophy on topics of representation, authorship, ideology, aesthetics, and emotion. The editors explain that film studies has reached a crisis of method after a growth period founded on structural linguistics, psychoanalysis, and Continental philosophy. They wish to alter this foundation and “give momentum to work in an analytic vein”, which requires them to correct the misconception of analytic philosophy in film studies as narrow and conservative, a (...)
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  • In Praise of Immoral Art.Daniel Jacobson - 1997 - Philosophical Topics 25 (1):155-199.
  • Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (Trans. Pears and McGuinness).Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1961 - Routledge.
    Perhaps the most important work of philosophy written in the twentieth century, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus first appeared in 1921 and was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme compression and brilliance, it immediately convinced many of its readers and captivated the imagination of all. Its chief influence, at first, was on the Logical Positivists of the 1920s and 30s, but many other philosophers were stimulated by its philosophy (...)
  • On the Cognitive Triviality of Art.Jerome Stolnitz - 1992 - British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (3):191-200.
  • The Paradox of Emotion and Fiction.Robert J. Yanal - 1994 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (1):54-75.
     
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  • Autographic and Allographic Art Revisited.Jerrold Levinson - 1980 - Philosophical Studies 38 (4):367 - 383.
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  • Speaker Meaning.Wayne Davis - 1992 - Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (3):223 - 253.
  • Hume and the Paradox of Taste.Mary Mothersill - 1989 - In G. Dickie (ed.), Aesthetics: A Critical Anthology. St. Martin's.
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  • On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense.Friedrich Nietzsche - unknown
     
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  • Film Music and Narrative Agency.Jerrold Levinson - 1996 - In David Bordwell Noel Carroll (ed.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies. U Wisconsin Press.
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  • How Can We Be Moved by the Fate of Anna Karenina.Colin Radford & Michael Weston - 1975 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes( 49:67-93.
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  • How to Share an Intention.J. David Velleman - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):29-50.
    Existing accounts of shared intention do not claim that a single token of intention can be jointly framed and executed by multiple agents; rather, they claim that multiple agents can frame distinct, individual intentions in such a way as to qualify as jointly intending something. In this respect, the existing accounts do not show that intentions can be shared in any literal sense. This article argues that, in failing to show how intentions can be literally shared, these accounts fail to (...)
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  • Against Interpretation.Susan Sontag - 1966 - Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    A series of provocative discussions on everything from individual authors to contemporary religious thinking, Against Interpretation and Other Essays is the definitive collection of Susan Sontag's best known and important works published in Penguin Modern Classics. -/- Against Interpretation was Susan Sontag's first collection of essays and made her name as one of the most incisive thinkers of our time. Sontag was among the first critics to write about the intersection between 'high' and 'low' art forms, and to give them (...)
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  • Languages of Art.Nelson Goodman - 1970 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 3 (1):62-63.
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  • The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays.ALBERT CAMUS - 1955 - Vintage Books.
     
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  • Essays and Lectures.Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
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  • Categories of Art.Kendall L. Walton - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (3):334-367.
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  • Aesthetic Supervenience.Jerrold Levinson - 1983 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (S1):93-110.
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  • Walking Together: A Paradigmatic Social Phenomenon.Margaret Gilbert - 1990 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):1-14.
    The everyday concept of a social group is approached by examining the concept of going for a walk together, an example of doing something together, or "shared action". Two analyses requiring shared personal goals are rejected, since they fail to explain how people walking together have obligations and rights to appropriate behavior, and corresponding rights of rebuke. An alternative account is proposed: those who walk together must constitute the "plural subject" of a goal. The nature of plural subjecthood, the thesis (...)
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  • Truth in Fiction.David K. Lewis - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
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  • Shared Cooperative Activity.Michael E. Bratman - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):327-341.
  • Beauty and Truth: A Study of Hegel’s Aesthetics.Stephen Bungay - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
  • Vision and Design.ROGER FRY - 1928 - Chatto & Windus.
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