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  1. Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Medicine in Comparison with Consent in Other Areas of Human Activity.Steve Clarke - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):169-187.
  • Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method, and Point.R. M. Hare (ed.) - 1981 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this work, the author has fashioned out of the logical and linguistic theses of his earlier books a full-scale but readily intelligible account of moral argument.
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  • Great Uncertainty About Small Things.Sven Ove Hansson - 2004 - Techne 8 (2):26-35.
  • Philosophical Perspectives on Risk.Sven Ove Hansson - 2004 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 8 (1):10-35.
    In non-technical contexts, the word “risk” refers, often rather vaguely, to situations in which it is possible but not certain that some undesirable event will occur. In technical contexts, the word has many uses and specialized meanings. The most common ones are the following.
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  • Freedom and Self–Ownership.Daniel Attas - 2000 - Social Theory and Practice 26 (1):1-23.
    The principle that each person is his own property occupies an almost axiomatic status in right-wing liberal thought as well as in some egalitarian theories. I reject any, full or partial, notion of property with respect to oneself by showing that any appeal and any justifiability which may be associated with self-ownership can at most serve to ground rights which are demonstrably non-property rights. As a contrast to self ownership, I introduce the non-proprietarian notion of Original Freedom. I compare the (...)
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  • Simmons and the Concept of Consent.Nicholas Fotion - 1987 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 6 (2):21-24.
  • Consent and Fairness in Planning Land Use.A. John Simmons - 1987 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 6 (2):5-19.
  • Informed Consent and Engineering: An Essay Review.Thomas A. Long - 1983 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 3 (1):59-66.
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  • Respect for Persons, Informed Consent Andthe Assessment of Infectious Disease Risks in Xenotransplantation.Jeffrey H. Barker & Lauren Polcrack - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):53-70.
    Given the increasing need for solid organ and tissue transplants and the decreasing supply of suitable allographic organs and tissue to meet this need, it is understandable that the hope for successful xenotransplantation has resurfaced in recent years. The biomedical obstacles to xenotransplantation encountered in previous attempts could be mitigated or overcome by developments in immunosuppression and especially by genetic manipulation of organ source animals. In this essay we consider the history of xenotransplantation, discuss the biomedical obstacles to success, explore (...)
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  • Innocence Lost: An Examination of Inescapable Moral Wrongdoing.Christopher W. Gowans - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Our lives are such that moral wrongdoing is sometimes inescapable for us. We have moral responsibilities to persons which may conflict and which it is wrong to violate even when they do conflict. Christopher W. Gowans argues that we must accept this conclusion if we are to make sense of our moral experience and the way in which persons are valuable to us. In defending this position, he critically examines the recent moral dilemmas debate. He maintains that what is important (...)
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  • A History and Theory of Informed Consent.William G. Bartholome - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):605-606.
  • Weighing Risks and Benefits.Sven Ove Hansson - 2004 - Topoi 23 (2):145-152.
    It is almost universally acknowledged that risks have to be weighed against benefits, but there are different ways to perform the weighing. In conventional risk analysis, collectivist risk-weighing is the standard. This means that an option is accepted if the sum of all individual benefits outweighs the sum of all individual risks. In practices originating in clinical medicine, such as ethical appraisals of clinical trials, individualist risk-weighing is the standard. This implies a much stricter criterion for risk acceptance, namely that (...)
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  • Intrinsic Limitations of Property Rights.J. M. Elegido - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (5):411 - 416.
    Many people take for granted an absolute conception of property rights. According to this conception, if I own a piece of property I have a moral right to do with it as I please, irrespective of the needs of others.This paper articulates an argument against this conception of property rights. First, it shows that there are many possible conceptions of property rights, and that there are significant differences among the models of ownership which have prevailed in different societies. Then, it (...)
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  • Informed Consent Out of Context.Sven Ove Hansson - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):149-154.
    Several attempts have been made to transfer the concept of informed consent from medical and research ethics to dealing with affected groups in other areas such as engineering, land use planning, and business management. It is argued that these attempts are unsuccessful since the concept of informed consent is inadequate for situations in which groups of affected persons are dealt with collectively (rather than individually, as in clinical medicine). There are several reasons for this. The affected groups from which informed (...)
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  • Philosophical Problems in Cost–Benefit Analysis.Sven Ove Hansson - 2007 - Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):163-183.
    Cost–benefit analysis (CBA) is much more philosophically interesting than has in general been recognized. Since it is the only well-developed form of applied consequentialism, it is a testing-ground for consequentialism and for the counterfactual analysis that it requires. Ten classes of philosophical problems that affect the practical performance of cost–benefit analysis are investigated: topic selection, dependence on the decision perspective, dangers of super synopticism and undue centralization, prediction problems, the indeterminateness of our control over future decisions, the need to exclude (...)
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  • Gauging Criminal Harm: A Living-Standard Analysis.Andrew von Hirsch & Nils Jareborg - 1991 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 11 (1):1-38.
  • Informed Consent: Autonomy and Self-Ownership.David Archard - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):19–34.
    Using the example of an unconsented mouth swab I criticise the view that an action of this kind taken in itself is wrongful in respect of its being a violation of autonomy. This is so much inasmuch as autonomy merits respect only with regard to ‘critical life choices’. I consider the view that such an action is nevertheless harmful or risks serious harm. I also respond to two possible suggestions: that the action is of a kind that violates autonomy; and, (...)
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  • Patients and Prisoners: The Ethics of Lethal Injection.Gerald Dworkin - 2002 - Analysis 62 (2):181–189.
    An argument against the participation of physicians in capital punishment by means of lethal injection.
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  • Lethal Injection, Autonomy and the Proper Ends of Medicine.David Silver - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (2):205–211.
  • Patients and Prisoners: The Ethics of Lethal Injection.G. Dworkin - 2002 - Analysis 62 (2):181-189.
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  • Kant's Ethics and Duties to Oneself.Lara Denis - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321–348.
    This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them-selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant's moral theory is overly demanding or produces agents who are preoccupied with their own virtue. (...)
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  • Beyond the Harm Principle.Arthur Ripstein - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):215-245.
  • Lethal Injection, Autonomy and the Proper Ends of Medicine: A Response to David Silver.Gerald Dworkin - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (2):212–214.
  • A Reconsideration of Kant's Treatment of Duties to Oneself.Margaret Paton - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):222-233.