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  1. Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective.Donna Harawy - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (3):575-599.
  • Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society.Bruno Latour - 1987 - Harvard University Press.
    In this book Bruno Latour brings together these different approaches to provide a lively and challenging analysis of science, demonstrating how social context..
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  • Simians, Cyborgs and Women the Reinvention of Nature.Donna J. Haraway - 1991 - Routledge.
    I. Nature as a System of Production and Reproduction 1. Animal Sociology and a Natural Economy of the Body Politic 2. The Past Is the Contested Zone 3. The Biological Enterprise II. Contested Readings: Narrative Natures 4. In the Beginning Was the Word 5. The Contest for Primate Nature 6. Reading Buchi Emecheta III. Differential Politics of Innappropriate/d Others 7. ’Gender’ for a Marxist Dictionary 8. A Cyborg Manifesto 9. Situated Knowledges 10. The Biopolitics of Postmodern Bodies.
     
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  • Cultural Boundaries of Science Credibility on the Line.Thomas F. Gieryn - 1999
  • Midstream Modulation of Technology: Governance From Within.Carl Mitcham, Roop L. Mahajan & Erik Fisher - 2006 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 26 (6):485-496.
    Public “upstream engagement” and other approaches to the social control of technology are currently receiving international attention in policy discourses around emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. To the extent that such approaches hold implications for research and development activities, the distinct participation of scientists and engineers is required. The capacity of technoscientists to broaden the influences on R&D activities, however, implies that they conduct R&D differently. This article discusses the possibility for more reflexive participation by scientists and engineers in the (...)
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  • The GMO-Nanotech (Dis)Analogy?W. D. Kay & Ronald Sandler - 2006 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 26 (1):57-62.
    The genetically-modified-organism experience has been prominent in motivating science, industry, and regulatory communities to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. However, there are some significant problems with the GMO-nanotech analogy. First, it overstates the likelihood of a GMO-like backlash against nanotechnology. Second, it invites misconceptions about the reasons for public engagement and social and ethical issues research as well as their appropriate roles in nanotech research, development, application, commercialization, and regulatory processes. After an explication of the standard GMO-Nanotech (...)
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  • Dazzled by the Mirage of Influence?: STS-SSK in Multivalent Registers of Relevance.Brian Wynne - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (4):491-503.
    Andrew Webster proposes that science and technology studies align itself more thoroughly with practical policy contexts, actors and issues, so as to become more useful, and thus more a regular actor in such worlds. This commentary raises some questions about this approach. First, I note that manifest influence in science or policy or both should not become-by default, or deliberately-a criterion of intellectual quality for STS research work. I distinguish between reflective historical work, which delineates the contingent ways in which (...)
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  • Crossing Boundaries Social Science in the Policy Room.Andrew Webster - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (4):458-478.
    This article discusses the relationship between a deconstructivist method in science and technology studies and the more recent moves towards a reconstructivist engagement with science and science policy making. Drawing on examples from the author's own research, the article identifies three forms of engagement and their relative utility and limitations. The article argues that these are typical of STS work that seeks direct engagement with science policy making and which could form the basis for a more "serviceable STS" that retains (...)
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  • Moving Worlds: The Performativity of Affective Engagement.Turid Markussen - 2006 - Feminist Theory 7 (3):291-308.
    In exploring ways to speak about perception and feeling within the framework of a deconstructive cultural analysis, the article contributes to a narration of methodologies for research so as to better their capacity for engaging with the more faint or elusive manifestations of the real. The argument is grounded in a view of affective presence as involving a way of apprehending the world. Based on an exploration of affectivity and perception in a research project on prostitution in North Norway, it (...)
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  • Why Has Critique Run Out of Steam? From Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern.Bruno Latour - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (2):225-248.
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  • Nanotechnology, Governance, and Public Deliberation: What Role for the Social Sciences?Phil Macnaghten, , Matthew B. Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2005 - Science Communication 27 (2):268-291.
    In this article we argue that nanotechnology represents an extraordinary opportunity to build in a robust role for the social sciences in a technology that remains at an early, and hence undetermined, stage of development. We examine policy dynamics in both the United States and United Kingdom aimed at both opening up, and closing down, the role of the social sciences in nanotechnologies. We then set out a prospective agenda for the social sciences and its potential in the future shaping (...)
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  • Societal Dimensions of Nanotechnology as a Trading Zone: Results From a Pilot Project.Michael E. Gorman, James F. Groves & Jeff Shrager - 2004 - In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 63--77.
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  • Constitutional Moments in Governing Science and Technology.Sheila Jasanoff - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):621-638.
    Scholars in science and technology studies have recently been called upon to advise governments on the design of procedures for public engagement. Any such instrumental function should be carried out consistently with STS’s interpretive and normative obligations as a social science discipline. This article illustrates how such threefold integration can be achieved by reviewing current US participatory politics against a 70-year backdrop of tacit constitutional developments in governing science and technology. Two broad cycles of constitutional adjustment are discerned: the first (...)
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  • Erratum To: What Happens in the Lab Does Not Stay in the Lab: Applying Midstream Modulation to Enhance Critical Reflection in the Laboratory. [REVIEW]Daan Schuurbiers - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):789-789.
    Erratum to: What Happens in the Lab Does Not Stay in the Lab: Applying Midstream Modulation to Enhance Critical Reflection in the Laboratory Content Type Journal Article Category Erratum Pages 789-789 DOI 10.1007/s11948-011-9334-7 Authors Daan Schuurbiers, Centre for Society and Genomics, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Journal Science and Engineering Ethics Online ISSN 1471-5546 Print ISSN 1353-3452 Journal Volume Volume 17 Journal Issue Volume 17, Number 4.
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  • On Nanotechnology and Ambivalence: The Politics of Enthusiasm. [REVIEW]Matthew Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):131-142.
    The promise of scientific and technological innovation – particularly in fields such as nanotechnology – is increasingly set against what has been articulated as a deficit in public trust in both the new technologies and regulatory mechanisms. Whilst the development of new technology is cast as providing contributions to both quality of life and national competitiveness, what has been termed a ‘legitimacy crisis’ is seen as threatening the vitality of this process. However in contrast to the risk debates that dominated (...)
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  • Ethnographic Invention: Probing the Capacity of Laboratory Decisions. [REVIEW]Erik Fisher - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):155-165.
    In an attempt to shape the development of nanotechnologies, ethics policy programs promote engagement in the hope of broadening the scope of considerations that scientists and engineers take into account. While enhancing the reflexivity of scientists theoretically implies changes in technoscientific practice, few empirical studies demonstrate such effects. To investigate the real-time effects on engineering research practices, a laboratory engagement study was undertaken to specify the interplay of technical and social considerations during the normal course of research. The study employed (...)
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  • Ethics and Nanotechnology: Views of Nanotechnology Researchers. [REVIEW]Robert McGinn - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (2):101-131.
    A study was conducted of nanotechnology (NT) researchers’ views about ethics in relation to their work. By means of a purpose-built questionnaire, made available on the Internet, the study probed NT researchers’ general attitudes toward and beliefs about ethics in relation to NT, as well as their views about specific NT-related ethical issues. The questionnaire attracted 1,037 respondents from 13 U.S. university-based NT research facilities. Responses to key questionnaire items are summarized and noteworthy findings presented. For most respondents, the ethical (...)
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  • Researching and Teaching the Ethics and Social Implications of Emerging Technologies in the Laboratory.Joan McGregor & Jameson M. Wetmore - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):17-30.
    Ethicists and others who study and teach the social implications of science and technology are faced with a formidable challenge when they seek to address “emerging technologies.” The topic is incredibly important, but difficult to grasp because not only are the precise issues often unclear, what the technology will ultimately look like can be difficult to discern. This paper argues that one particularly useful way to overcome these difficulties is to engage with their natural science and engineering colleagues in laboratories. (...)
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  • Responsible Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Contextualizing Socio-Technical Integration Into the Nanofabrication Laboratories in the USA. [REVIEW]Debasmita Patra - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (2):143-157.
    There have been several conscious efforts made by different stakeholders in the area of nanoscience and nanotechnology to increase the awareness of social and ethical issues (SEI) among its practitioners. But so far, little has been done at the laboratory level to integrate a SEI component into the laboratory orientation schedule of practitioners. Since the laboratory serves as the locus of activities of the scientific community, it is important to introduce SEI there to stimulate thinking and discussion of SEI among (...)
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  • Essay Review: ELSI's Revenge. [REVIEW]Audra J. Wolfe - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):183-193.
  • Questioning 'Participation': A Critical Appraisal of its Conceptualization in a Flemish Participatory Technology Assessment.Michiel van Oudheusden - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):673-690.
    This article draws attention to struggles inherent in discourse about the meaning of participation in a Flemish participatory technology assessment (pTA) on nanotechnologies. It explores how, at the project’s outset, key actors (e.g., nanotechnologists and pTA researchers) frame elements of the process like ‘the public’ and draw on interpretive repertoires to fit their perspective. The examples call into question normative commitments to cooperation, consensus building, and common action that conventionally guide pTA approaches. It is argued that pTA itself must reflect (...)
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  • What Happens in the Lab: Applying Midstream Modulation to Enhance Critical Reflection in the Laboratory. [REVIEW]Daan Schuurbiers - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):769-788.
    In response to widespread policy prescriptions for responsible innovation, social scientists and engineering ethicists, among others, have sought to engage natural scientists and engineers at the ‘midstream’: building interdisciplinary collaborations to integrate social and ethical considerations with research and development processes. Two ‘laboratory engagement studies’ have explored how applying the framework of midstream modulation could enhance the reflections of natural scientists on the socio-ethical context of their work. The results of these interdisciplinary collaborations confirm the utility of midstream modulation in (...)
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  • Why Critique Has Run Out of Steam.Bruno Latour - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (2):225-248.
  • The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program at the National Human Genome Research Institute.Elizabeth J. Thomson, Joy T. Boyer & Eric M. Meslin - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (3):291-298.
  • Who Wrote the Book of Life? A History of the Genetic Code.Celeste Michelle Condit, Phillip R. Sloan & James D. Watson - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):183-193.
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  • Capital Report: Whither the ELSI Program?Leslie Roberts - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):5.
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  • Whither the ELSI Program?Leslie Roberts - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (6):5-5.
  • The ELSI HypothesisGene Mapping: Using Law and Ethics as GuidesGeorge J. Annas Sherman EliasThe Code of Codes: Scientific and Social Issues in the Human Genome ProjectDaniel J. Kevles Leroy HoodLe Genome Humain: Une Responsabilite Scientifique Et socialeMarcel J. Melancon Raymond D. LambertBibliography: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome ProjectMichael S. Yesley. [REVIEW]M. Susan Lindee - 1994 - Isis 85 (2):293-296.
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  • The ELSI Hypothesis.M. Lindee - 1994 - Isis 85:293-296.