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  1. The Abolition of Man.C. S. Lewis - 1947 - New York: the Macmillan Company.
    C. S. Lewis sets out to persuade his audience of the importance and relevance of universal values such as courage and honor in contemporary society.
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  • Friendship, Altruism and Morality.Laurence A. Blum - 1980 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Good,No Highlights,No Markup,all pages are intact, Slight Shelfwear,may have the corners slightly dented, may have slight color changes/slightly damaged spine.
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  • Perception, Empathy, and Judgment: An Inquiry Into the Preconditions of Moral Performance.Arne Johan Vetlesen - 1993 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _In Perception, Empathy, and Judgment_ Arne Johan Vetlesen focuses on the indispensable role of emotion, especially the faculty of empathy, in morality. He contends that moral conduct is severely threatened once empathy is prevented from taking part in an interplay with cognitive faculties in acts of moral perception and judgment. Drawing on developmental psychology, especially British "object relations" theory, to illuminate the nature and functioning of empathy, Vetlesen shows how moral performance is constituted by a sequence involving perception, judgment, and (...)
     
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  • Plato and the Metaphysics of Desire.David M. Halperin - 1989 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):27-52.
  • Platonic Eros and What Men Call Love.David M. Halperin - 1985 - Ancient Philosophy 5 (2):161 - 204.
  • How Socratic Pedagogy Works.Pete Boghossian - 2003 - Informal Logic 23 (2).
  • Cultivating Sentimental Dispositions Through Aristotelian Habituation.Jan Steutel & Ben Spiecker - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (4):531–549.
  • On the Contribution of Literature and the Arts to the Educational Cultivation of Moral Virtue, Feeling and Emotion.David Carr - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):137-151.
    This paper sets out to explore connections between a number of plausible claims concerning education in general and moral education in particular: (i) that education is a matter of broad cultural initiation rather than narrow academic or vocational training; (ii) that any education so conceived would have a key concern with the moral dimensions of personal formation; (iii) that emotional growth is an important part of such moral formation; and (iv) that literature and other arts have an important part to (...)
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  • Educating Moral Emotions: A Praxiological Analysis. [REVIEW]Bruce Maxwell & Roland Reichenbach - 2007 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):147-163.
    This paper presents a praxiological analysis of three everyday educational practices or strategies that can be considered as being directed at the moral formation of the emotions. The first consists in requests to imagine other's emotional reactions. The second comprises requests to imitate normative emotional reactions and the third to re-appraise the features of a situation that are relevant to an emotional response. The interest of these categories is not just that they help to organize and recognize the significance of (...)
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  • Moral Emotions.Ronald de Sousa - 2001 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):109 - 126.
    Emotions can be the subject of moral judgments; they can also constitute the basis for moral judgments. The apparent circularity which arises if we accept both of these claims is the central topic of this paper: how can emotions be both judge and party in the moral court? The answer I offer regards all emotions as potentially relevant to ethics, rather than singling out a privileged set of moral emotions. It relies on taking a moderate position both on the question (...)
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  • Moral Emotions.Ronald de Sousa - 2001 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):109-126.
    Emotions can be the subject of moral judgments; they can also constitute the basis for moral judgments. The apparent circularity which arises if we accept both of these claims is the central topic of this paper: how can emotions be both judge and party in the moral court? The answer I offer regards all emotions as potentially relevant to ethics, rather than singling out a privileged set of moral emotions. It relies on taking a moderate position both on the question (...)
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  • Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.
    This paper defends an intellectualist interpretation of Diotima’s speech in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that Diotima’s purpose, in discussing the lower lovers, is to critique their erōs as aimed at a goal it can never secure, immortality, and as focused on an inferior object, themselves. By contrast, in loving the form of beauty, the philosopher gains a mortal sort of completion; in turning outside of himself, he also ceases to be preoccupied by his own incompleteness.
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  • The Virtues.P. T. Geach - 1977 - Religious Studies 14 (3):414-417.
     
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  • Cultivating Sentimental Dispositions Through Aristotelian Habituation.Jan Steutel & Ben Spiecker - 2004 - Philosophy of Education 38 (4):531-549.
  • Can We Teach Justified Anger?Kristjan Kristjansson - 2005 - Philosophy of Education 39 (4):671-689.
    The question of whether there is such a thing as teachable justified anger encompasses three distinct questions: the psychological question of whether the emotions in general, and anger in particular, are regulatable; the moral question of whether anger can ever be morally justified; and the educational question of whether we have any sound methods at our disposal for teaching justified anger. In this paper I weave Aristotelian responses to those questions together with insights from the current psychology literature on emotion (...)
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  • The Nature of Sympathy.Max Scheler, Peter Heath & W. Stark - 1955 - Philosophical Review 64 (4):671-673.
  • Plato: Ethics.Gerasimos Santas - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
  • .Jennifer Patterson - 1993
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  • .Sarah Patterson - 2008
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