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  1. Developmental Changes in Visual Short-Term Memory in Infancy: Evidence From Eye-Tracking.Lisa M. Oakes, Heidi A. Baumgartner, Frederick S. Barrett, Ian M. Messenger & Steven J. Luck - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  • Culture and Change Blindness.Takahiko Masuda & Richard E. Nisbett - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (2):381-399.
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  • The Relation Between Event Apprehension and Utterance Formulation in Children: Evidence From Linguistic Omissions.Ann Bunger, John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):135-149.
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  • A Developmental Shift From Similar to Language-Specific Strategies in Verb Acquisition: A Comparison of English, Spanish, and Japanese.Mandy J. Maguire, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Mutsumi Imai, Etsuko Haryu, Sandra Vanegas, Hiroyuki Okada, Rachel Pulverman & Brenda Sanchez-Davis - 2010 - Cognition 114 (3):299-319.
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  • From Ugly Duckling to Swan? Japanese and American Beliefs About the Stability and Origins of Traits.Frank Keil - manuscript
    Two studies compared the development of beliefs about the stability and origins of physical and psychological traits in Japan and the United States in three age groups: 5–6-year-olds, 8–10-year-olds, and college students. The youngest children in both cultures were the most optimistic about negative traits changing in a positive direction over development and being maintained over the aging period. The belief that individual differences in traits are inborn increased with age, and in all age groups, this belief was related to (...)
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  • Two-Year-Olds Can Begin to Acquire Verb Meanings in Socially Impoverished Contexts.Sudha Arunachalam - 2013 - Cognition 129 (3):569-573.
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  • To See or Not to See: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes.Ronald A. Rensink, J. Kevin O'Regan & James J. Clark - 1997 - Psychological Science 8:368-373.
    Methods. We employed a "flicker" technique, in which an original and a modified image (each of duration 240 ms) continually alternated, with a blank field (duration 80 ms) between each display. Images were all of real-world scenes. One of three kinds of change (appearance/disappearance, color, or translation) was made to an object or region in each scene. Changes were large and easily seen under normal conditions. Subjects viewed the flicker display, and pressed a key when they noticed the change.
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  • The Emotional Dog and Its Rational Tail: A Social Intuitionist Approach to Moral Judgment.Jonathan Haidt - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):814-834.
    Research on moral judgment has been dominated by rationalist models, in which moral judgment is thought to be caused by moral reasoning. The author gives 4 reasons for considering the hypothesis that moral reasoning does not cause moral judgment; rather, moral reasoning is usually a post hoc construction, generated after a judgment has been reached. The social intuitionist model is presented as an alternative to rationalist models. The model is a social model in that it deemphasizes the private reasoning done (...)
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  • The Cultural Mind: Environmental Decision Making and Cultural Modeling Within and Across Populations.Scott Atran, Douglas L. Medin & Norbert O. Ross - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):744-776.
    This paper describes a cross-cultural research project on the relation between how people conceptualize nature and how they act in it. Mental models of nature differ dramatically among and within populations living in the same area and engaged in more or less the same activities. This has novel implications for environmental decision making and management, including dealing with commons problems. Our research also offers a distinct perspective on models of culture, and a unified approach to the study of culture and (...)
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  • Are Chinese and German Children Taxonomic, Thematic, or Shape Biased? Influence of Classifiers and Cultural Contexts.Mutsumi Imai, Henrik Saalbach & Elsbeth Stern - 2010 - Frontier in Psychology 1.
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  • Who is Crossing Where? Infants’ Discrimination of Figures and Grounds in Events.Tilbe Göksun, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Mutsumi Imai, Haruka Konishi & Hiroyuki Okada - 2011 - Cognition 121 (2):176-195.
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  • The Influence of Culture: Holistic Versus Analytic Perception.Richard E. Nisbett & Yuri Miyamoto - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):467-473.
  • Scope of Linguistic Influence: Does a Classifier System Alter Object Concepts?Henrik Saalbach & Mutsumi Imai - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (3):485-501.
  • Culture and Systems of Thought: Holistic Versus Analytic Cognition.Richard E. Nisbett, Kaiping Peng, Incheol Choi & Ara Norenzayan - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (2):291-310.
    The authors find East Asians to be holistic, attending to the entire field and assigning causality to it, making relatively little use of categories and formal logic, and relying on "dialectical" reasoning, whereas Westerners, are more analytic, paying attention primarily to the object and the categories to which it belongs and using rules, including formal logic, to understand its behavior. The 2 types of cognitive processes are embedded in different naive metaphysical systems and tacit epistemologies. The authors speculate that the (...)
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  • Culture and Aesthetic Preference: Comparing the Attention to Context of East Asians and Americans.Takahiko Masuda - 2008 - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 34 (9):1260-1275.
    Prior research indicates that East Asians are more sen- sitive to contextual information than Westerners. This article explored aesthetics to examine whether cultural variations were observable in art and photography. Study 1 analyzed traditional artistic styles using archival data in representative museums. Study 2 investigated how contemporary East Asians and Westerners draw landscape pictures and take portrait photographs. Study 3 further investigated aesthetic preferences for portrait photographs. The results suggest that traditional East Asian art has predominantly context-inclusive styles, whereas Western (...)
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