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  1. Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):132-134.
    In the introduction to his Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology, John Bricke traces the remarkable lack of agreement among commentators concerning the nature of Hume’s moral philosophy to two main failings: insufficient attention to “the foundations, in his philosophy of mind, on which Hume builds when constructing his theory of morality” and “the practice of taking his theory of morality as a patchwork of severally brilliant and provocative, but essentially unintegrated parts.” Accordingly, he proposes to “fasten (...)
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  • A Treatise of Human Nature.David Hume & A. D. Lindsay - 1911 - Dent.
    'These new Oxford University Press editions have been meticulously collated from various exatant versions. Each text has an excellent introduction including an overview of Hume's thought and an account of his life and times. Even the difficult, and rarely commented-on, chapters on space and time are elucidated. There are also useful notes on the text and glossary. These scholarly new editions are ideally adapted for a whole range of readers, from beginners to experts.' -Jane O'Grady, Catholic Herald, 4/8/00. One of (...)
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  • Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity.Vere Chappell (ed.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do human beings ever act freely, and if so what does freedom mean? Is everything that happens antecedently caused, and if so how is freedom possible? Is it right, even for God, to punish people for things that they cannot help doing? This volume presents the famous seventeenth-century controversy in which Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall debate these questions and others. The complete texts of their initial contributions to the debate are included, together with selections from their subsequent replies to (...)
     
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  • Freedom and Belief, Galen Strawson. [REVIEW]Stephen L. White - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (1):119-122.
  • A Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty.Anthony Collins - 1997
  • The Letters.Benedictus de Spinoza, Steven Barbone, Lee Rice & Jacob Adler (eds.) - 1995 - Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing.
    Translation by Samuel Shirley of known correspondence to/from Baruch Spinoza. Volume includes many annotations, bibliography, and introduction.
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  • An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.David Hume - 1901 - The Monist 11:312.
  • Reason and Action. --.Bruce Aune - 1977 - Holland, Boston, D. Reidel Pub. Co.
    Philosophers writing on the subject of human action have found it tempting to introduce their subject by raising Wittgenstein's question, 'What is left over if you subtract the fact that my arm goes up from the fact that I raise my arm?' The presumption is that something of particular interest is involved in an action of raising an arm that is not present in a mere bodily movement, and the philosopher's task is to specify just what this is. Unfortunately, such (...)
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  • Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Morality.James Baillie - 2000 - Routledge.
    David Hume is widely recognised as the greatest philosopher to have written in the English language. His Treatise on Human Nature is one of the most important works of moral philosophy ever written. Hume on Morality introduces and assesses * Hume's life and the background of the Treatise * The ideas and text in the Treatise * Hume's continuing importance to philosophy.
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  • Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity.Vere Chappell (ed.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do human beings ever act freely, and if so what does freedom mean? Is everything that happens antecedently caused, and if so how is freedom possible? Is it right, even for God, to punish people for things that they cannot help doing? This volume presents the famous seventeenth-century controversy in which Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall debate these questions and others. The complete texts of their initial contributions to the debate are included, together with selections from their subsequent replies to (...)
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  • Hume.Terence Penelhum - 1978 - Mind 87 (346):287-289.
  • Getting Causes From Powers.Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Causation is everywhere in the world: it features in every science and technology. But how much do we understand it? Mumford and Anjum develop a new theory of causation based on an ontology of real powers or dispositions. They provide the first detailed outline of a thoroughly dispositional approach, and explore its surprising features.
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  • Understanding Human Agency.Erasmus Mayr - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Our self-understanding as human agents includes a commitment to three crucial claims about human agency: that agents must be active, that actions are part of the natural order of the universe, and that intentional actions can be explained by the agent's reasons for acting. While all of these claims are indispensable elements of our view of ourselves as human agents, they are in continuous conflict and tension with one another, especially once one adopts the currently predominant view of what the (...)
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Peter van Inwagen - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    Discusses the incompatibility of the concepts of free will and determinism and argues that moral responsibility needs the doctrine of free will.
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  • A Treatise of Human Nature.David Hume & A. D. Lindsay - 1958 - Philosophical Quarterly 8 (33):379-380.
  • The Constitution of Agency: Essays on Practical Reason and Moral Psychology.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Christine M. Korsgaard is one of today's leading moral philosophers: this volume collects ten influential papers by her on practical reason and moral psychology ...
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  • Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity.Christine M. Korsgaard - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Agency and identity -- Necessitation -- Acts and actions -- Aristotle and Kant -- Agency and practical identity -- The metaphysics of normativity -- Constitutive standards -- The constitution of life -- In defense of teleology -- The paradox of self-constitution -- Formal and substantive principles of reason -- Formal versus substantive -- Testing versus weighing -- Maximizing and prudence -- Practical reason and the unity of the will -- The empiricist account of normativity -- The rationalist account of normativity (...)
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  • The Possibility of Practical Reason.David Velleman - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Suppose that we want to frame a conception of reasons that isn't relativized to the inclinations of particular agents. That is, we want to identify particular things that count as reasons for acting simpliciter and not merely as reasons for some agents rather than others, depending on their inclinations. One way to frame such a conception is to name some features that an action can have and to say that they count as reasons for someone whether or not he is (...)
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Peter Van Inwagen - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    "This is an important book, and no one interested in issues which touch on the free will will want to ignore it."--Ethics. In this stimulating and thought-provoking book, the author defends the thesis that free will is incompatible with determinism. He disputes the view that determinism is necessary for moral responsbility. Finding no good reason for accepting determinism, but believing moral responsiblity to be indubitable, he concludes that determinism should be rejected.
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  • Freedom and Belief.Galen Strawson - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    On the whole, we continue to believe firmly both that we have free will and that we are morally responsible for what we do. Here, the author argues that there is a fundamental sense in which there is no such thing as free will or true moral responsibility (as ordinarily understood). Devoting the main body of his book to an attempt to explain why we continue to believe as we do, Strawson examines various aspects of the "cognitive phenomenology" of freedom--the (...)
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  • Hume’s Philosophy of the Self.A. E. Pitson - 2002 - Routledge.
    This is a clear assessment of Hume's theories of the self and personal identity, including his famous Treatise on Human Nature . Pitson provides a critical exploration of his thinking, also examining the continuing relevance of Hume's theories for contemporary philosophy and relating it to his broader reflections on human nature itself. Divided into two parts, Pitson's study follows Hume's important distinction between two aspects of personal identity: the "mental" and the "agency". The first part discusses Hume's conception of the (...)
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  • The View From Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to view the world in a detached way: We can think about the world in terms that transcend our own experience or interest, and consider the world from a vantage point that is, in Nagel's words, "nowhere in particular". At the same time, each of us is a particular person in a particular place, each with his own "personal" view of the world, a view that we can recognize as just one aspect of the (...)
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  • Of Liberty and Necessity:The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. Harris puts (...)
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  • On Action.Carl Ginet - 1990 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    This book deals with foundational issues in the theory of the nature of action, the intentionality of action, the compatibility of freedom of action with determinism, and the explantion of action. Ginet's is a volitional view: that every action has as its core a 'simple' mental action. He develops a sophisticated account of the individuation of actions and also propounds a challenging version of the view that freedom of action is incompatible with determinism.
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  • The Philosophical Writings of Descartes: Volume 1.René Descartes - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    Volumes I and II provided a completely new translation of the philosophical works of Descartes, based on the best available Latin and French texts. Volume III contains 207 of Descartes' letters, over half of which have previously not been translated into English. It incorporates, in its entirety, Anthony Kenny's celebrated translation of selected philosophical letters, first published in 1970. In conjunction with Volumes I and II it is designed to meet the widespread demand for a comprehensive, authoritative and accurate edition (...)
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  • The Tradition of Scottish Philosophy: A New Perspective on the Enlightenment.Alexander Broadie - 1990 - Barnes & Noble.
    Introduction The chief aim of this book is to give an account of two great periods in the history of Scottish culture. One is, inevitably, that of the ...
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  • Mind and Morality: An Examination of Hume’s Moral Psychology.John Bricke - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is a penetrating study of the theory of mind and morality that Hume developed in his Treatise of Human Nature and other writings. Hume rejects any conception of moral beliefs and moral truths. He understands morality in terms of distinctive desires and other sentiments that arise through the correction of sympathy. Hume's theory presents a powerful challenge to recent cognitivist theories of moral judgement, Bricke argues, and suggests significant limitations to recent conventionalist and contractarian accounts of morality's content.
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  • A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume’s Treatise.Annette Baier - 1991 - Harvard University Press.
  • The Philosophy of David Hume.Norman Kemp Smith - 1948 - Philosophy 23 (86):264-268.
  • On the Aim of Belief.David Velleman - 2000 - In The Possibility of Practical Reason. Oxford University Press. pp. 244--81.
    This paper explores the sense in which belief "aims at the truth". In this course of this exploration, it discusses the difference between belief and make-believe, the nature of psychoanalytic explanation, the supposed "normativity of meaning", and related topics.
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  • The Possibility of Practical Reason.J. David Velleman - 1996 - Ethics 106 (4):694-726.
  • Free Action.A. I. Melden - 1961 - Philosophy 37 (141):280-281.
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  • Hume.Barry Stroud - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (4):597-601.
  • On Action.Carl Ginet - 1990 - Mind 100 (3):390-394.
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  • The philosophy of David Hume.Norman Kemp Smith - 1948 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 138:235-241.
  • The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism and Irreligion, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2008, pp. XVI-424. Paul Russell in questo suo importante libro si propone un'inter-pretazione unitaria del Trattato sulla natura umana di Hume. Nel fare ciò si confronta con le «interpretazioni accettate» che hanno. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia 101 (1).
  • The Phenomenology of Agency.Tim Bayne - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (1):182-202.
    The phenomenology of agency has, until recently, been rather neglected, overlooked by both philosophers of action and philosophers of consciousness alike. Thankfully, all that has changed, and of late there has been an explosion of interest in what it is like to be an agent. 1 This burgeoning field crosses the traditional boundaries between disciplines: philosophers of psychopathology are speculating about the role that unusual experiences of agency might play in accounting for disorders of thought and action; cognitive scientists are (...)
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  • Hume’s Philosophy of the Self.A. E. Pitson - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):359-361.
  • The Possibility of Practical Reason.J. David Velleman - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 121 (3):263-275.
  • Hume on the Direct Passions and Motivation.Tito Magri - 2011 - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), A Companion to Hume. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 185-200.
  • Hume and the Metaphysics of Agency.Joshua M. Wood - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):87-112.
    I examine Hume’s ‘construal of the basic structure of human agency’ and his ‘analysis of human agency’ as they arise in his investigation of causal power. Hume’s construal holds both that volition is separable from action and that the causal mechanism of voluntary action is incomprehensible. Hume’s analysis argues, on the basis of these two claims, that we cannot draw the concept of causal power from human agency. Some commentators suggest that Hume’s construal of human agency is untenable, unduly skeptical, (...)
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  • Agency and Alienation.Jennifer Hornsby - 2008 - In M. de Caro & D. MacArthur (eds.), Naturalism In Question. Cambridge, USA: Harvard University Press. pp. 173-87.
    It is argued that the standard story of human action, as it is standardly naturalistically understood, should be rejected. Rather than seeking an agent amidst the workings of the mind (as in Velleman's "What Happens When Someone Acts"), we need to recognize an agent’s place in the world she inhabits. And in order to do so we have to resist the naturalistic assumptions of the standard causal story.
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  • An Essay on Free Will.Michael Slote - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):327-330.
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  • The Principles of Psychology.William James - 1890 - The Monist 1:284.
     
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  • David Hume and the Concept of Volition.John M. Connolly & Thomas Keutner - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.
  • The Will as Impression.John M. Connolly - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):276-305.
  • Gilding or Staining" the World with "Sentiments" and "Phantasms.Barry Stroud - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (2):253-272.
  • The View from Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 43 (2):399-403.
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  • Consciousness in Act and Action.Keith Hossack - 2003 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):187-203.
    This paper develops an account of consciousness in action. Both consciousness and action are related to knowledge. A voluntary action is defined as a volition, or something intentionally effected by means of such volitions. Volitions are conscious mental acts whose proper function is to make their content true. A mental act is the exercise of a power of mind and a conscious mental act is identical with knowledge of its own phenomenal character. This set of definitions elucidates the relations between (...)
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  • Hume's Moral Psychology.Terence Penelhum - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.