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  1. From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW]D. Gene Witmer - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):459.
    This slim volume is sure to provoke. The topics include physicalism, the theory of color, and metaethics, but the primary focus is metaphilosophical: Jackson aims to defend the use of conceptual analysis as a tool for doing “serious metaphysics.”.
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  • Wave Function Ontology.Bradley Monton - 2002 - Synthese 130 (2):265-277.
    I argue that the wave function ontology for quantum mechanics is an undesirable ontology. This ontology holds that the fundamental space in which entities evolve is not three-dimensional, but instead 3N-dimensional, where N is the number of particles standardly thought to exist in three-dimensional space. I show that the state of three-dimensional objects does not supervene on the state of objects in 3N-dimensional space. I also show that the only way to guarantee the existence of the appropriate mental states in (...)
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  • Quantum Equilibrium and the Origin of Absolute Uncertainty.Detlef Durr, Sheldon Goldstein & Nino Zanghi - 1992 - Journal of Statistical Physics 67:843-907.
     
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  • Are There Really Instantaneous Velocities?Frank Arntzenius - 2000 - The Monist 83 (2):187-208.
    Zeno argued that since at any instant an arrow does not change its location, the arrow does not move at any time, and hence motion is impossible. I discuss the following three views that one could take in view of Zeno's argument:(i) the "at-at" theory, according to which there is no such thing as instantaneous velocity, while motion in the sense of the occupation of different locations at different times is possible,(ii) the "impetus" theory, according to which instantaneous velocities do (...)
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  • Fundamental Physical Theories: Mathematical Structures Grounded on a Primitive Ontology.Valia Allori - 2007 - Dissertation, Rutgers
    In my dissertation I analyze the structure of fundamental physical theories. I start with an analysis of what an adequate primitive ontology is, discussing the measurement problem in quantum mechanics and theirs solutions. It is commonly said that these theories have little in common. I argue instead that the moral of the measurement problem is that the wave function cannot represent physical objects and a common structure between these solutions can be recognized: each of them is about a clear three-dimensional (...)
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  • Are All Particles Identical?Sheldon Goldstein - manuscript
    We consider the possibility that all particles in the world are fundamentally identical, i.e., belong to the same species. Different masses, charges, spins, flavors, or colors then merely correspond to different quantum states of the same particle, just as spin-up and spin-down do. The implications of this viewpoint can be best appreciated within Bohmian mechanics, a precise formulation of quantum mechanics with particle trajectories. The implementation of this viewpoint in such a theory leads to trajectories different from those of the (...)
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  • Wholeness and the Implicate Order.David Bohm - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (3):303-305.
     
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  • Mind, Brain and the Quantum.Andy Clark - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):509-514.
  • Wholeness and the Implicate Order.David Bohm - 1980 - Routledge.
    In this classic work David Bohm, writing clearly and without technical jargon, develops a theory of quantum physics which treats the totality of existence as an unbroken whole.
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  • Quantum Equilibrium and the Role of Operators as Observables in Quantum Theory.Sheldon Goldstein - manuscript
    Bohmian mechanics is arguably the most naively obvious embedding imaginable of Schr¨ odinger’s equation into a completely coherent physical theory. It describes a world in which particles move in a highly non-Newtonian sort of way, one which may at first appear to have little to do with the spectrum of predictions of quantum mechanics. It turns out, however, that as a consequence of the defining dynamical equations of Bohmian mechanics, when a system has wave function ψ its configuration is typically (...)
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  • Quantum Hamiltonians and Stochastic Jumps.Sheldon Goldstein - manuscript
    With many Hamiltonians one can naturally associate a |Ψ|2-distributed Markov process. For nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, this process is in fact deterministic, and is known as Bohmian mechanics. For the Hamiltonian of a quantum field theory, it is typically a jump process on the configuration space of a variable number of particles. We define these processes for regularized quantum field theories, thereby generalizing previous work of John S. Bell [3] and of ourselves [11]. We introduce a formula expressing the jump rates (...)
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  • Unified Dynamics for Microscopic and Macroscopic Systems.GianCarlo Ghirardi, Alberto Rimini & Tullio Weber - 1986 - Physical Review D 34 (D):470–491.
  • On the Einstein Podolsky Rosen Paradox.J. S. Bell - 2004 [1964] - In Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 14--21.
  • Mind, Brain and the Quantum.Michael Lockwood - 1990 - Mind 99 (396):650-652.
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  • Seven Steps Toward the Classical World.Valia Allori, Detlef Duerr, Nino Zanghi & Sheldon Goldstein - 2002 - Journal of Optics B 4:482–488.
    Classical physics is about real objects, like apples falling from trees, whose motion is governed by Newtonian laws. In standard quantum mechanics only the wave function or the results of measurements exist, and to answer the question of how the classical world can be part of the quantum world is a rather formidable task. However, this is not the case for Bohmian mechanics, which, like classical mechanics, is a theory about real objects. In Bohmian terms, the problem of the classical (...)
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  • Seven Steps Towards the Classical World.Shelly Goldstein - unknown
    governed by Newtonian laws. In standard quantum mechanics only the wave function or the results of measurements exist, and to answer the question of how the classical world can be part of the quantum world is a rather formidable task. However, this is not the case for Bohmian mechanics, which, like classical mechanics, is a theory about real objects. In Bohmian terms, the problem of the classical limit becomes very simple: when do the Bohmian trajectories look Newtonian?
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  • A Suggested Interpretation of the Quantum Theory in Terms of ‘Hidden’ Variables, I and II.David Bohm - 1952 - Physical Review (85):166-193.
  • A Relativistic Version of the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber Model.Roderich Tumulka - 2006 - Journal of Statistical Physics 125:821-840.
  • Against ”Measurement'.J. S. Bell - 2004 - In Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 213--231.
  • Quantum Mechanics in Multiply-Connected Spaces.Sheldon Goldstein, D. Dürr, J. Taylor, R. Tumulka & and N. Zanghì - manuscript