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  1. Stealing Time at Work: Attitudes, Social Pressure, and Perceived Control as Predictors of Time Theft.Christine A. Henle, Charlie L. Reeve & Virginia E. Pitts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):53-67.
    Organizations have long struggled to find ways to reduce the occurrence of unethical behaviors by employees. Unfortunately, time theft, a common and costly form of ethical misconduct at work, has been understudied by ethics researchers. In order to remedy this gap in the literature, we used the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the antecedents of time theft, which includes behaviors such as arriving later to or leaving earlier from work than scheduled, taking additional or longer breaks than is (...)
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  • Employee Entitlement, Engagement, and Performance: The Moderating Effect of Ethical Leadership.Toby Joplin, Rebecca L. Greenbaum, J. Craig Wallace & Bryan D. Edwards - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (4):813-826.
    Drawing on theoretical arguments from the psychology discipline, we investigate the implications of employee entitlement in organizational settings. Specifically, we utilize workplace engagement theory to suggest that due to their skewed sense of deservingness, employees high in entitlement are less likely to experience workplace engagement. Furthermore, the negative relationship between employee entitlement and workplace engagement is strengthened when ethical leadership is low, yet mitigated when ethical leadership is high. Finally, we predict that under conditions of low ethical leadership, reductions in (...)
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  • Will Creative Employees Always Make Trouble? Investigating the Roles of Moral Identity and Moral Disengagement.Xiaoming Zheng, Xin Qin, Xin Liu & Hui Liao - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (3):653-672.
    Recent research has uncovered the dark side of creativity by finding that creative individuals are more likely to engage in unethical behavior. However, we argue that not all creative individuals make trouble. Using moral self-regulation theory as our overarching theoretical framework, we examine individuals’ moral identity as a boundary condition and moral disengagement as a mediating mechanism to explain when and how individual creativity is associated with workplace deviant behavior. We conducted two field studies using multi-source data to test our (...)
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  • Abusive Supervision and Employee Deviance: A Multifoci Justice Perspective.Haesang Park, Jenny M. Hoobler, Junfeng Wu, Robert C. Liden, Jia Hu & Morgan S. Wilson - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):1113-1131.
    In order to address the influence of unethical leader behaviors in the form of abusive supervision on subordinates’ retaliatory responses, we meta-analytically examined the impact of abusive supervision on subordinate deviance, inclusive of the role of justice and power distance. Specifically, we investigated the mediating role of supervisory- and organizationally focused justice and the moderating role of power distance as one model explaining why and when abusive supervision is related to subordinate deviance toward supervisors and organizations. With 79 independent sample (...)
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  • Illegitimate Tasks as an Impediment to Job Satisfaction and Intrinsic Motivation: Moderated Mediation Effects of Gender and Effort-Reward Imbalance.Rachel Omansky, Erin M. Eatough & Marcus J. Fila - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • You Abuse and I Criticize: An Ego Depletion and Leader–Member Exchange Examination of Abusive Supervision and Destructive Voice.Jeremy D. Mackey, Lei Huang & Wei He - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (3):579-591.
    We draw from ego depletion and leader–member exchange theories to provide nuanced insight into why abusive supervision is indirectly associated with supervisor-directed destructive voice. A multi-wave, multi-source field study demonstrates evidence that abusive supervision has a positive conditional indirect effect on supervisor-directed destructive voice through subordinates’ relational ego depletion with their supervisors that is stronger for higher LMX differentiation contexts than lower LMX differentiation contexts. We make novel theoretical, empirical, and practical contributions by providing a parsimonious explanation for why relational (...)
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  • Victim and Culprit? The Effects of Entitlement and Felt Accountability on Perceptions of Abusive Supervision and Perpetration of Workplace Bullying.Jeremy D. Mackey, Jeremy R. Brees, Charn P. McAllister, Michelle L. Zorn, Mark J. Martinko & Paul Harvey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):659-673.
    Although workplace bullying is common and has universally harmful effects on employees’ outcomes, little is known about workplace bullies. To address this gap in knowledge, we draw from the tenets of social exchange and displaced aggression theories in order to develop and test a model of workplace bullying that incorporates the effects of employees’ individual differences, perceptions of their work environments, and perceptions of supervisory treatment on their tendencies to bully coworkers. The results of mediated moderation analyses that examine responses (...)
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  • Abuse in the name of injustice: mechanisms of moral disengagement.Raymond Loi, Angela J. Xu & Yan Liu - 2015 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):57-72.
    Grounded in Bandura’s social cognitive theory of moral thought and action, we develop a conceptual model linking supervisors’ perceptions of organizational injustice and abusive supervision with moral disengagement mechanisms acting as the underlying process. Specifically, we elaborate why and how supervisors’ experiences of each type of injustice would trigger their adoption of distinctive moral disengagement mechanisms, which in turn lead to their abusive supervisory conduct. The present conceptual model sheds new light on linking organizational injustice to abusive supervision from a (...)
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  • Coping with Job Insecurity: The Role of Procedural Justice, Ethical Leadership and Power Distance Orientation. [REVIEW]Raymond Loi, Long W. Lam & Ka Wai Chan - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):361-372.
    This study examines the relationship between procedural justice and employee job insecurity, and the boundary conditions of this relationship. Drawing upon uncertainty management theory and ethical leadership research, we hypothesized that procedural justice is negatively related to job insecurity, and that this relationship is moderated by ethical leadership. We further predicted that the moderating relationship would be more pronounced among employees with a low power distance orientation. We tested our hypotheses using a sample of 381 workers in Macau and Southern (...)
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  • Identity, Moral, and Equity Perspectives on the Relationship Between Experienced Injustice and Time Theft.Yan Liu & Christopher M. Berry - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):73-83.
    Time theft is a costly burden on organizations. However, there is limited knowledge about why time theft occurs. To advance this line of research, this conceptual paper looks at the association between organizational injustice and time theft from identity, moral, and equity perspectives. This paper proposes that organizational injustice triggers time theft through decreased organizational identification. It also proposes that moral disengagement and equity sensitivity moderate this process such that organizational identification is less likely to mediate among employees with high (...)
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  • Investigating When and Why Psychological Entitlement Predicts Unethical Pro-organizational Behavior.Allan Lee, Gary Schwarz, Alexander Newman & Alison Legood - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):109-126.
    In this research, we examine the relationship between employee psychological entitlement and employee willingness to engage in unethical pro-organizational behavior. We hypothesize that a high level of PE—the belief that one should receive desirable treatment irrespective of whether it is deserved—will increase the prevalence of this particular type of unethical behavior. We argue that, driven by self-interest and the desire to look good in the eyes of others, highly entitled employees may be more willing to engage in UPB when their (...)
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  • How and When Compulsory Citizenship Behavior Leads to Employee Silence: A Moderated Mediation Model Based on Moral Disengagement and Supervisor–Subordinate Guanxi Views.Peixu He, Zhenglong Peng, Hongdan Zhao & Christophe Estay - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):259-274.
    Prior research on citizenship behavior has mainly focused on its voluntary side—organizational citizenship behavior. Unfortunately, although compulsory behavior is a global organizational phenomenon, the involuntary side of CB—compulsory citizenship behavior, defined as employees’ involuntary engagement in extra-role work activities that are beneficial to the organization : 77–93, 2006)—has long been neglected and very little is known about its potential negative consequences. Particularly, research on CCB–counterproductive work behavior association is still in its nascent stage. Therefore, drawing on moral disengagement theory and (...)
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  • ‘First, Do No Harm’: The Role of Negative Emotions and Moral Disengagement in Understanding the Relationship Between Workplace Aggression and Misbehavior.Roberta Fida, Carlo Tramontano, Marinella Paciello, Chiara Guglielmetti, Silvia Gilardi, Tahira M. Probst & Claudio Barbaranelli - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • An Integrative Approach to Understanding Counterproductive Work Behavior: The Roles of Stressors, Negative Emotions, and Moral Disengagement.Roberta Fida, Marinella Paciello, Carlo Tramontano, Reid Griffith Fontaine, Claudio Barbaranelli & Maria Luisa Farnese - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):131-144.
    Several scholars have highlighted the importance of examining moral disengagement in understanding aggression and deviant conduct across different contexts. The present study investigates the role of MD as a specific social-cognitive construct that, in the organizational context, may intervene in the process leading from stressors to counterproductive work behavior. Assuming the theoretical framework of the stressor-emotion model of CWB, we hypothesized that MD mediates, at least partially, the relation between negative emotions in reaction to perceived stressors and CWB by promoting (...)
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