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  1. Topographic maps in human frontal and parietal cortex.Michael A. Silver & Sabine Kastner - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):488-495.
  • The e-z reader model of eye-movement control in reading: Comparisons to other models.Erik D. Reichle, Keith Rayner & Alexander Pollatsek - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):445-476.
    The E-Z Reader model (Reichle et al. 1998; 1999) provides a theoretical framework for understanding how word identification, visual processing, attention, and oculomotor control jointly determine when and where the eyes move during reading. In this article, we first review what is known about eye movements during reading. Then we provide an updated version of the model (E-Z Reader 7) and describe how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading. We then review several alternative models of (...)
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  • A biologically realistic cortical model of eye movement control in reading.Jakob Heinzle, Klaus Hepp & Kevan A. C. Martin - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (3):808-830.
  • SWIFT: A Dynamical Model of Saccade Generation During Reading.Ralf Engbert, Antje Nuthmann, Eike M. Richter & Reinhold Kliegl - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):777-813.
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  • Developmental dyslexia: The visual attention span deficit hypothesis.Marie-Line Bosse, Marie Josèphe Tainturier & Sylviane Valdois - 2007 - Cognition 104 (2):198-230.
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  • Control of goal-directed and stimulus-driven attention in the brain.M. Corbetta & G. L. Shulman - 2002 - Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3 (3):201-215.
  • Developmental dyslexia: The visual attention span deficit hypothesis.Marie-Line Bosse, Marie-Josèphe Tainturier & Sylviane Valdois - 2007 - Cognition 104 (2):198-230.
    The visual attention (VA) span is defined as the amount of distinct visual elements which can be processed in parallel in a multi-element array. Both recent empirical data and theoretical accounts suggest that a VA span deficit might contribute to developmental dyslexia, independently of a phonological disorder. In this study, this hypothesis was assessed in two large samples of French and British dyslexic children whose performance was compared to that of chronological-age matched control children. Results of the French study show (...)
     
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